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@gasmitty....Yes. Setback, as a dangerous issue, is only a problem with a very specific set of circumstances. In the case of the 40 S&W, it was loads running at max pressure which had powder charges that may have been already compressed to some degree because heavier bullets (lead core anyway) are by definition longer. When set back, those long heavy bullets compressed the powder charge to an unacceptable level and caused a chamber pressure spike. I haven't pulled any 40s apart lately, but I've been told most of the manufacturers have gone to a denser powder which lays in the case better, thus reducing the likelihood of a compressed charge.

In the hundreds of thousands of .45ACP reloads I made, you couldn't have compressed the powder charge under any circumstances. They were light loads. with very small amounts of powder.

BTW....those of you who reload. They make "powder check" dies specifically to automate the process of double checking for double charged cases. Pretty handy if you're running a progressive press.
 
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I've got a partial box of PMC "Flying Ashtray" 45 acp ammo that has a bullet setback problem. Some of the bullets set themselves noticeably deeper in the case with just normal use. That box of ammo has set in my storage area since sometime in the 1980's. I'm afraid to shoot them, too cheap to pitch them, too lazy to break them down.

That's what I like about my home-cast lead boolits. Even with a taper crimp, there is a slight ridge between the case and boolit that precludes setback.
If you have a cast iron Dutch oven, put some rounds in it with the lid on tight, heat it up and let them cook off on their own. It's an interesting way to dispose of unusable rounds. Just keep the lid on and don't stand too close in case brass fragments sneak out from under the lid.

 

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If you have a cast iron Dutch oven, put some rounds in it with the lid on tight, heat it up and let them cook off on their own. It's an interesting way to dispose of unusable rounds. Just keep the lid on and don't stand too close in case brass fragments sneak out from under the lid.

Back in the day we would pry open a bullet and dump the powder in an ashtray at the bar, then grab a beer and sit back and watch the fun.
 

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The dent in the pot was most likely from the primer shooting out. When I was in AK, a couple of weapons guys decided to de-arm a 30mm A-10 case with a blow torch. The primer shot out and started a fire. They had some 'splaining to do afterwards.
 

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As a Reloader I do pay attention to bullet setback. When I do my Flare stage I do it as tight as I can without impeding on my bullet seating. Always works and no setback....Tight is Right!.
 

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As a Reloader I do pay attention to bullet setback. When I do my Flare stage I do it as tight as I can without impeding on my bullet seating. Always works and no setback....Tight is Right!.
Are you sure you don't mean crimp stage? If not, I'm confused.
 

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Are you sure you don't mean crimp stage? If not, I'm confused.
Nope, you can also help maintain neck tension by limiting your expanding on the case neck to the bare minimum. That's why a lot of 357Sig reloaders don't even expand (or flare) their case necks. there are also some dies that size down the brass to the point you get a "wasp waist" when the bullets seated to the point it looks like a reverse bottle-neck.

Chuck
 

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Nope, you can also help maintain neck tension by limiting your expanding on the case neck to the bare minimum. That's why a lot of 357Sig reloaders don't even expand (or flare) their case necks. there are also some dies that size down the brass to the point you get a "wasp waist" when the bullets seated to the point it looks like a reverse bottle-neck.

Chuck
That was my take on it as well. I don't flare rifle cases and give just the bare minimum on pistol cases. Especially if I'm loading lead bullets.
 

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Nope, you can also help maintain neck tension by limiting your expanding on the case neck to the bare minimum. That's why a lot of 357Sig reloaders don't even expand (or flare) their case necks. there are also some dies that size down the brass to the point you get a "wasp waist" when the bullets seated to the point it looks like a reverse bottle-neck.

Chuck
OK, got it. Agreed, the least flare necessary is best.
 

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I shot next to a couple old coots once who were using .357Sig reloads from converted .40 S&W cases. They explained that while many think the .357 Sig was developed from a .40 S&W, it really was from a 10mm case as the converted .40s are shorter than a commercial .357Sig. They showed me how the converted case necks were even shorter than the commercial .357 Sig necks but said they didn't have any problem with the loads setting back. They must have been careful with the neck expecting/flaring also, but since both claimed to be retired machinists, they may have altered their dies a bit also, or at least the expansion ball.
 
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