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I think I could make a bullet-proof door that weighed less than 150 pounds. Sounds like overkill. Cheaper too. Might be some fire safety issues with it.
 

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I don't know about this product, but I have always thought better physical security should be a part of defending high-risk institutions from active shooters. My wife has a friend, who is not rich, by any means, but she still budgets to put her son in a private school. There were many attractions to this school, but one of them is that to get in the building after classes start requires a person to swipe a card at the heavy front door. Staff, students and parents are issued ID cards. When they swipe, their information and ID picture come up on a screen in the office, along with a live picture of them from the door camera. If the ID and face don't match, they don't get in.
 

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Playing the devil's advocate for a moment.

Suppose you do manage to lock the shooter out in the hall with kids safely behind the locked door. Suppose said shooter has a rifle and decides to unload a mag through the WALL?
 

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I’ve seen this, and other methods of locking doors, all of which are pointless. They won’t keep the bad guys out. In fact, it will be the students and teachers who will open the doors up for the bad guys.

Playing the devil's advocate for a moment.

Suppose you do manage to lock the shooter out in the hall with kids safely behind the locked door. Suppose said shooter has a rifle and decides to unload a mag through the WALL?
Or window.
 
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Playing the devil's advocate for a moment.

Suppose you do manage to lock the shooter out in the hall with kids safely behind the locked door. Suppose said shooter has a rifle and decides to unload a mag through the WALL?
This was discussed in the Active Shooter seminar I took. The shooter might well shoot through the wall. He might get some people that way. But he will get far fewer than if he had something to aim at. Also shooters get off on seeing their victims hit. This robs him of that. Finally, in that seminar we were taught that there are places in the room a shooter is less likely to shoot through the wall. Students and staff should be trained on that. It's not perfect, but it could still be part of the solution. There is not going to be one quick-fix for this.
 

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All newly built hospitals have to have bulletproof doors in the ICU. I don't know if it is state or fed law. We are a hospital that just so happens to have said doors. They don't weigh 150 lbs. They are impressive, and look like wood. We had a person kick in the previous doors in a fit of rage and threaten everyone. I also know that the hospital is looking to replace all Fire doors with bulletproof. So if there ever is another "Situation" they can lockdown the hospital. So why can't schools do the same thing?
 

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. So why can't schools do the same thing?

$$$$$$ It would blow budgets out the window to do something like this!!

Everyone wants security, but nobody wants to pay higher taxes to do it. Football team is more important and gets more money when needed, but not security for all the students.


My DIL is a school teacher and told me that one of the outside doors near her classroom has a card reader on it , but has been not working (doesn't lock) for over a year, even with her reporting it several times.
 

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How about we work on teaching the next generation the value of a humans life.
How about we go back and teach morals, civics, the Golden Rule or can I dare say The Ten Commandments.
If you bring God back into school you may not need bullet proof doors
 

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All newly built hospitals have to have bulletproof doors in the ICU. I don't know if it is state or fed law. We are a hospital that just so happens to have said doors. They don't weigh 150 lbs. They are impressive, and look like wood. We had a person kick in the previous doors in a fit of rage and threaten everyone. I also know that the hospital is looking to replace all Fire doors with bulletproof. So if there ever is another "Situation" they can lockdown the hospital. So why can't schools do the same thing?
Can you cite a source for that requirement for ICU’s? My wife works in an ICU and has never heard of this. Perhaps it’s a California law? As far as the weight of the doors, armor is heavy.
 

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I don't know about this product, but I have always thought better physical security should be a part of defending high-risk institutions from active shooters. My wife has a friend, who is not rich, by any means, but she still budgets to put her son in a private school. There were many attractions to this school, but one of them is that to get in the building after classes start requires a person to swipe a card at the heavy front door. Staff, students and parents are issued ID cards. When they swipe, their information and ID picture come up on a screen in the office, along with a live picture of them from the door camera. If the ID and face don't match, they don't get in.
Wouldn't a Ring doorbell have been cheaper?
 

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My son was in a hospital in Florida for a spot on his lung and they had guards with metal detectors in the hall as you entered. When you took a wrong turn, right away, somebody would notice that you were out of place and they would ask you where your trying to go and they would direct you how to get there. Most of the time they would walk with you part of the way. At first I thought that they were really being helpful but then I realized that nobody could wander around without being noticed and that made it high security. If they just had armed guards at these schools at times when the main doors were open for students then that would be a big deterrent. I haven't heard yet of a shooter that had to break a door down to get into the school.
 

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First thing I thought of, then I figured it would be easier to set fire to the place.
Setting a fire to kill people would take all of the fun out of going to school to shoot a bunch of people. But you are right that if somebody wants to kill people they will find a way.
 

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Setting a fire to kill people would take all of the fun out of going to school to shoot a bunch of people. But you are right that if somebody wants to kill people they will find a way.
Sadly, there is a certain amount of truth to this. Killing people is one thing, but the second and third order effects of the murder is what makes killing people with guns so much different than anything else.

Fire as a weapon? Those deaths don’t count!
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Land_fire
 
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My son was in a hospital in Florida for a spot on his lung and they had guards with metal detectors in the hall as you entered. When you took a wrong turn, right away, somebody would notice that you were out of place and they would ask you where your trying to go and they would direct you how to get there. Most of the time they would walk with you part of the way. At first I thought that they were really being helpful but then I realized that nobody could wander around without being noticed and that made it high security. If they just had armed guards at these schools at times when the main doors were open for students then that would be a big deterrent. I haven't heard yet of a shooter that had to break a door down to get into the school.
All the hospitals around me are that way. While "technically" not illegal to CC in them, most anyhow, you're not getting past the guard and detectors. I like to mess with them at the check-in desk. They want DLs to scan, I give them my Mil ID. It throws them for a loop because it doesn't scan.
 
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So why can't schools do the same thing?
Utah solved the 'school shooter problem' by allowing ANYONE with a carry permit to carry in all schools, and no need to ask for permission.
 

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I don't know about this product, but I have always thought better physical security should be a part of defending high-risk institutions from active shooters. My wife has a friend, who is not rich, by any means, but she still budgets to put her son in a private school. There were many attractions to this school, but one of them is that to get in the building after classes start requires a person to swipe a card at the heavy front door. Staff, students and parents are issued ID cards. When they swipe, their information and ID picture come up on a screen in the office, along with a live picture of them from the door camera. If the ID and face don't match, they don't get in.
I attended a seminar a few years back by a Col. Grossman; and of his many excellent points on who and what are the bad peeps' targets, classrooms with poorly locking or easily defeated door was a biggie with him. And of course, secure entryways are not not the complete solution, but they are an effective part of a comprehensive planning, preparedness and response plan.

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