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I almost talked myself out of a voice in wasted effort trying to get people to see the “bigger picture” when the Delaware Legislature was busying themselves preparing to pass the State’s “red flag” statute. It was akin to pushing a rope up a hill or beating one’s forehead against a brick wall. The concept was whole heartedly backed by the NRA lobbyists along with the Delaware Shooting Sports Association and it passed the legislature with unanimous support. EVERY SINGLE SENATOR and REPRESENTATIVE, Democrat and Republican alike, voted for the abomination that was passed. Republican turncoats used the fact that both the NRA and DSSA supported the bill as cover to justify their actions. These “red flag” bills are the most dangerous threats to gun owner’s rights in my lifetime. It seems no one could or would stop to consider that judges are human beings. No judge is going to want to be the person that denied an order to then wakeup in the morning to see the individual that they didn’t “red flag” did in fact go on a shooting rampage. Judges will invariably err on the side of their interests and not on the side of the accused individual’s rights.
They sold us cheap on this one. More will follow. NRA's endorsement of such laws reveals much, IMO.
 
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I really think there is going to come a point with these red flag laws where people who want to keep theirs will have to stop talking about them openly, stop posting on gun forums, and even make a show of selling off a few of their guns while proclaiming they are done with all of them, but quietly keeping a few.

I don't know how else to protect yourself when and if this crap goes nationwide
 

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Thank God Texas is not like this. My employer is very anti gun even to the point where they told me to not openly discuss anything about firearms in the office. I would not put it by someone in our ultra liberal management to possibly consider reporting something under an expanded red flag law if it existed here. Keep in mind that I was only speaking about different firearm models and features/cost. I did not even mention anything about firing a weapon. :rolleyes:
You might consider updating your resume. Someone in the office staff, perhaps one with whom you are competing for a job, will remember this and bring it up to your disadvantage at a really bad time.
 

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"We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion . . . Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other." - John Adams

When 51% of Americans care more about safety than freedom, the America we knew will be over. We are very close to that point.
 

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One very important thing to remember - the "red flag laws" era is just beginning. There's no chance that it won't expand and spread to other "feel good" laws that chip away at your gun rights. Ownership of guns need to be kept away from public knowledge, especially neighbors, and family. Kids need to be told to NEVER mention that guns are in the house. Sad and dangerous times await all of us, and trusting anybody is simply foolish.
 

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CA law makes the act of intentionally creating a false accusation under red flag a misdemeanor. And yes, if you could prove someone did this maliciously, you could probably sue. But the big problem is proving that would be almost impossible. Consider that a red flag can be done without:
  • Any prior due process
  • Any involvement of clinical psychological professionals and therefore no clinical evaluation of the subject
  • The subject having made any threats or committed any threatening actions
  • The subject being accused of being a danger to anyone but himself
In addition, "evidence" that is allowed under the law is that the subject has recently bought "a lot" of guns and/or ammunition. The atmosphere today is "see something, say something" and people being "triggered" into "feeling threatened." There are factions in CA is actually promoting the use of red flag with LE training, websites and PSAs.

So someone doesn't really have to lie to bring a red flag charge against you. They just have to say you own guns and they feel threatened. And we know a lot of people feel threatened just because you own guns and seem like someone who stands up for himself. If no real facts have to be presented to get red flagged, how you prove they maliciously presented false facts? If you have ever had an argument with someone, no matter how justified, that just ices that cake.

Seven years ago I worked in HR at a big company in PA. We were doing layoffs. Hundreds of people were given two weeks notice their job was ending. They had a chance to say goodbye, clean out their desks, etc. Some even had layoff parties. But I know of at least one instance where a guy who had done nothing wrong was given no notice, not allowed to clean out his desk and marched out of the building with his access card confiscated. Why? It was known he had studied martial arts and that he owned firearms. The company never said that, but I'm convinced that was the sole reason. That was not in line with HR policy at all, they just did it.
Thanks much for such a thoughtful and cogent reply, my DC friend.

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CA law makes the act of intentionally creating a false accusation under red flag a misdemeanor. And yes, if you could prove someone did this maliciously, you could probably sue. But the big problem is proving that would be almost impossible. Consider that a red flag can be done without:
[
Seven years ago I worked in HR at a big company in PA. We were doing layoffs. Hundreds of people were given two weeks notice their job was ending. They had a chance to say goodbye, clean out their desks, etc. Some even had layoff parties. But I know of at least one instance where a guy who had done nothing wrong was given no notice, not allowed to clean out his desk and marched out of the building with his access card confiscated. Why? It was known he had studied martial arts and that he owned firearms. The company never said that, but I'm convinced that was the sole reason. That was not in line with HR policy at all, they just did it.
A little over a year ago, the company I work for outsourced IT and laid-off the entire IT staff. The IT manager was known to have guns and the general manager is a real gun phobe (CA import). The general manager had two city of Boulder police officers and two armed security guards present for the dismissal of the IT manager and continued the armed security guards for a month after the layoff which was as amicable as one can be. We all went out to lunch with the laid-off IT manager that day at noon, the GM, who bristles at the word gun, was not in attendance.
 
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