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When I was competing I noticed something strange with shooters who did not have any practical training with a flashlight. They tended to pull the trigger when the center of their flashlight, either rail mounted or not, was on target. Unfortunately the center of the light did not coincide with point of aim a lot of the time. The hard facts are that it takes some training to properly use a light with a weapon and without that training it can be a liability...........

Read the whole post here: Can't shoot what you can't see
 

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Great post, I unfortunately have no experience running any of my guns in the dark, flashlights or WML's. Hopefully I can change that someday.
 

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I make a point of always having a flashlight (Streamlight ProTac 2L is my EDC, Surefire 6PX Tactical at home - both bright lights), and have practiced going through my house at night and have not personally had an issue with a 180-200 Lumen light totally messing-up my night vision. But, you only turn it on in short bursts (pointing in different directions). A much brighter light might be different, but these two lights are bright enough to see and bright enough to be disruptive if you flash someone in the eyes (accidentally flash yourself in a mirror and you will understand).

I'll practice shooting with the flashlight at the range, and during FOF training. It doesn't take long to get comfortable, but it does take practice. Here's a different article that covers low light techniques - http://www.ccjatraining.com/articles/low.pdf

About a month ago I did take a weekend training course with CCJA and was very impressed. The second day was all about low light shooting. We worked through a very large area (something like a 6,000+ sq. ft. building) while being monitored and coached by guys with night vision goggles. To make it even more fun, there were "bad guys" (extremely proficient instructors) and we all had Simunition guns. That training experience taught me many things, including:

1. This is harder to do under stress, so practice really is important.
2. Familiarity of the environment can be a big advantage - something to keep in mind at home.
3. The flashlight can make people aware of you, but doesn't have to be a total position give away.
4. You want to be sure you are shooting at the right thing, so this is important.

Hopefully this helps anyone thinking about doing more with flashlights!
 

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Actually ...... we did a run where it was very very low light & could not see the target, and went by sound. When you heard the light 3 beeps ... you 'quickly' tried to shoot that target where the beeps originated (distance roughly 30 ft). I hit more targets than anyone else, and never missed a target, although some were better hits than others. You got 3 rapid beeping sounds at each target (random as to which target). It sharpens your senses. However, in real life it's not a recommended thing to do at all ... for any reason, unless the sound you hear and the flash you see is someone trying to shoot you.
 

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I do practice with the light activated from time to time just to familiarize myself with running a tac light on the gun.
 

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And why not point a 700 lumen flashlight directly at your home invader to destroy THEIR night vision? Getting that much light suddenly shined right in your face will make it hard to see anyway because of how bright it is, but then if for whatever reason the flashlight is turned off, they'll need time to adjust as well. And you know your home better than any attacker. Seems to me that if you simply light up a room by pointing it at the ceiling you both have an advantage (ergo, neither of you has the advantage).
 
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