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Ok so I don't know if this topic as been started yet. If so I can't find one. But I'm new to the conceal/open carry thing. Beer done it. I bought a pistol the other week. A ruger sr9c the reason I chose this pistol is cause of the way it feels the trigger pull the safety been in as I'm a newbie. I'm getting familiar with the georgia carry laws and going to go get my permit. After I get really good with safety and what not of my pistol. So what I'm getting to is. What is it like carrying open or conceal? Where to carry on me how to carry what does it feel like? I heard it's a life changing thing. So I'm open to all opinions and thoughts.
 

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Good questions. "What's it like?" can have a lot of answers, though. It's highly subjective. Some don't take to it well, given the responsibility and potential ramifications.

Some suggested reading, books by Massad Ayoob:

  • In The Gravest Extreme -- a classic read, on the pros/cons and potential ramifications of carrying a deadly weapon for self-defense.
  • The Gun Digest Book of Concealed Carry
  • Armed: The Essential Guide to Concealed Carry
  • The Truth About Self-Protection
Check out some of the "sticky" posts at the top of the Defensive Carry Guns forum.

In the Holsters & Carry Options forum, there are lots of prior discussions on people's preferences for IWB, OWB, pocket carry, shoulder carry. For any given compact or sub-compact sidearm, there are often a few ways a person can carry. Even for larger, full-sized firearms, many people carry various ways. Depends on your body's shape, your comfort/ergonomic preferences, your clothing and concealment preferences and requirements. If you absolutely, positively gotta have it be unseen and unknown it's there, then that'll restrict some of your options, and very likely it'll guide you to some fundamental clothing choices (ie, a covering garment, such as a jacket).

Basics: Many feel the daily carry of a sidearm to be a bit of a pain, somewhat uncomfortable, and something they need to work at in order to keep concealed from view and avoid being the subject of attentions by others. Myself, I've carried nearly every single day for ~20yrs, either IWB, OWB or pocket. I've carried larger pistols, snubbie revolvers and smaller pistols in the pocket, and a couple in between. Long ago, I decided I would make appropriate wardrobe selections to accommodate carry, which included pants of certain cuts/materials to allow for added movement/stretch, larger belts, certain materials/colors of shirts and covering garments to ensure concealment.

My recommendation would be to acquire an exceptional belt, a reasonably low-cost pocket holster (if the gun's small enough for pocket carry) as well as a suitable low-cost IWB holster. Try them out, to see how you like it. Then, once you've got a basic frame of reference, you can place an order for a quality holster. A truly excellent holster can take some time to find. It can vary by material, cant, design, and effectiveness. You'll need to evaluate 100 different options from dozens of designers. Holsters are not all created equal, and that goes way beyond mere fit and finish. Some will change shape as you tighten the belt; some won't allow easy re-holstering; some won't stand up to daily use for long; some cost a fortune but aren't materially different than some better designs.

As for the responsibility, only you can decide how it's going to be for you. Ayoob's book In The Gravest Extreme helps quite a bit, in this regard. Here is a thread I started awhile back, on this basic question: To Carry or Not to Carry: What thinking did you go through?

Hopefully, some of that helps.

By all means, keep asking questions. Realize, though, that it's different for many people. For me, it's just one aspect of my security preparations, just one tool in the box. And by comparison to all the other preparations, it's not the major aspect. Mindset, awareness, forethought, circumspection, preparedness, suitable skills, suitable tools. All of these are parts of the whole security stance you bring to the table, but (IMO) by far the most important are the first several on that list, none of which have to do with tools, per se.

Welcome to the wonderful world of responsible carry. :eek:k:
 

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Oh boy, where does one start? I imagine that you're on the right track by getting familiar with your state laws. I would suggest getting some formal training in conjunction with studying your laws.

Life changing? I imagine that it could be if you ever needed it to save your life but I guess in a nutshell, it all comes down to the necessary level of responsibility that comes with carrying a firearm.

Knowing your laws, training, practice and always adhering to safety rules 100% of the time are only as important as you view your freedom and the lives of others. You are responsible for everything that goes right, and all that goes wrong.

Good luck and welcome to the forum! :wave:
 

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getting familiar with your state laws. I would suggest getting some formal training in conjunction with studying your laws.

Knowing your laws, training, practice and always adhering to safety rules 100% of the time are only as important as you view your freedom and the lives of others. You are responsible for everything that goes right, and all that goes wrong.
^ This. :eek:k:
 

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learn everything you can. learn the laws so you can put the perverbial "polite" smack down on folks who have the balls to question your rights.
a firearm is just one aspect of personal protection, as ccw9mm said.
Situational awarness has to be steped up. You no longer have the option to claim ignorance.
have fun, but be responsible, your now a card carrying member of "Awake" Americans. Represent us well.
 

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Training is number one in my book with your gun and laws in your state . I part time carry in my state (Maryland) and i will tell you it brings just another level of awareness . You must be responsible for you and your gun where ever you go with it. This forum will be one of the best places to come to educate yourself . I have learned so much, being a novice gun person. I wish i had found this place sooner . Good luck in your search for answers. And welcome to the site .
 

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Buy a holster.

Put the gun in the holster.

Put the holster and gun on.

Now walk around your house.

Carrying in public will feel just like that except initially you will think that everyone is staring at you and you will think that everyone will know that you have a gun. Then one day you will realize that most people have poor SA and they don't even notice you or your gun.:wink:
 

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I feel safer and sleep better at nights. A gun and a good dog and your good to go! :yup:
 

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+1 for the recommendation for Gun Digest Book of Concealed Carry. It's a great place to start.

Good choice of weapon with the SR9C, IMHO.
 

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One thing I encourage you to do is to join GeorgiaCarry.org. This is an organization of Georgia gun owners who work toward assuring the rights of all Georgia gun owners. In addition to helping all Georgia gun owners, you will find a lot of information available to answer a lot of your questions. In addition, I suggest you stop by the GeorgiaCarry.org booth at any of the statewide gun shows, or at many of the Bass-Pro stores in the area.
 

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I started carrying about 6 months ago. I felt like everyone was staring at me for probably 3 or 4 months, and I carried everyday. It will take a while to get comfortable wearing it and knowing you have a gun. Get to know the state laws and train. After that, carry safe, carry often.
 

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I am also new to guns and carry. I purchased my first firearm last November 2012. Found a very good beginners handgun class for $49.00 (regular price $75.00) (Plus $15 range fee and bring your own ammo) With range time it was a total of 8 hours. Be safe.. and Welcome.
 

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Ditto to what has already been said here, as far as the "how to".

"What is it like?". Sometimes it's awkward, uncomfortable, inconvenient, or seems like too much hassle. Other times its like nothing about your life is any different than before. Hopefully it never gets to the point that it was necessary to save my life or someone else's. Since carrying I definitely have more situational awareness then before. Also when faced with a bad situation or possible situation I think about what I should do to de-escalate the situation. Instead of looking for someone else to take responsibility for my safety.

It's liberating actually. More responsibility for sure, but liberating.
 

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wow, ccw9mm nailed pretty much everything about it, lots of great info in his posts. as others posted when you start carrying you will feel paranoid thinking that everyone is looking at you and that they all know you have a gun. this is normal, and it will go away with time. best thing is to practice carrying around your house first and get comfortable with your gun on you first, then move out to public. good luck.
 

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There's been a lot of good discussion here already. A little more on the physical and psychological aspects of carrying:

1. Expect it to be both physically and mentally uncomfortable to carry at first, especially if you carry IWB. I highly recommend that you carry inside your home for a while before your permit comes. Start as soon as you can so you can get used to it.

2. Over time the physical and mental discomfort will ease. Your holster will break in. Your body will become used to having the extra 30 or so ounces at your side. The paranoid feeling that everyone knows you are carrying and that if you lean the wrong you'll print and the jig will be up will begin to fade. You'll learn that people don't generally look at you all that closely, and that there's nothing to see even if they did.

3. Expect to need to tweak or even completely change something about how you carry. Maybe you'll discover that you like Glocks better than the Ruger SR9c. Maybe your first holster won't be right for you. Maybe you'll decide that you favor pocket carry. Understand that evolving in your carry method is a sign of maturity rather than a sign of failure. Fortunately it is fairly easy to sell guns or quality holsters that may not quite be for you.

4. As has been stated elsewhere learn everything you can about carry, firearms, and your firearm in particular. Pay special attention to mindset, it is far more important than gear or skill.

5. Enjoy the experience. Shooting is fun. Carrying is fun, but demands a sober mindset. Don't get so weighed down by worry that you overlook the positive aspects of carrying a concealed weapon.
 
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