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Further searching stated that the permit holder's shot took off the dirtbags hand, and I assume that they did catch him...it doesn't really give a summary of that...:ticking:
 

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Lots a words, I'm not sure I get the point. Sorry, maybe too much Cab/Merlot. It justed sounded like talking for the sake of talking. Can you boil it down a little for me?
 

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This happend really close to me...I never heard of it happening...
 

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Maybe Im off, and i dont know the laws where that guy was. but... isnt it illegal to have a gun in your posessition while drinking..

not that what he did wasnt a great thing, but maybe the bad guy could use that against him... hope im wrong
 

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I think he usually drank, but didn't on this occasion. I don't know for sure, but that's what it seemed like from his story and the lack of mentioning from the article.
 

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Wow - that is an intense story. Basically he unholstered his 1911 and then exchanged shots with a robber at point-blank range (who had a revolver.) Both were hit. Then the robber runs to the door. He clears a jam and then realizes he's been hit in the hands - which causes him not to be able to engage the grip safety well. Then they trade some more shots and the robber runs out of ammo.

They both lived and he stopped the robbery and who knows what else the robber was going to do.

Lessons learned from this:
- carry with one in the chamber
- practice in non-traditional positions (maybe with a laser?)
- prepare to shoot at really close ranges
- think about what to do if you can't use one hand
- grip safeties might be hard to use if your hand is injured
 

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interesting read. my favorite ranges don't allow for holster draws. Something we should all practice regularly.
Mine doesn't either. I practice sort of a bench draw. Lay the firearm on the bench, safety on, pick it up, disengage safety and fire.
Not an exact duplication of a holster draw, but similar.
 

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You can practice draw and fire at home with snap caps. Use your normal carry rig, and NO LIVE AMMO anywhere near you. Do it with everything from T-shirts to coats.

The guy did good, he survived an assault where the bad guy had the gun out and pointed at him and his friends while he was still holstered.
 

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Interesting story... The truth is often stranger than fiction...
 

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You can practice draw and fire at home with snap caps. Use your normal carry rig, and NO LIVE AMMO anywhere near you. Do it with everything from T-shirts to coats.

The guy did good, he survived an assault where the bad guy had the gun out and pointed at him and his friends while he was still holstered.
I don't have any experience with snap caps.. are they as loud as regular bullets? And where can you usually find them?
 

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He... told me to get up. He decided to assist me by grabbing onto my jacket with his left hand and pull me up. As I pushed myself up as well, I slid my hands under my chest to grab my pistol.

When he pulled me up, he was at my 5 O'clock position. I was still trying to keep him from seeing my gun until I was able to turn into him, so when I came up, I basically had my right hand (holding the pistol) tight to my stomach/chest with the muzzle pointed in the direction of my left shoulder. I don't know why I did that, except to conceal it and maybe so he couldn't take it away from me. I started turning to my right, into him, flipping the safety at some point along the way. He either saw the gun or heard the safety click as I had turned into him enough for him to be at my 3 O'clock and shoved his revolver inside my open jacket against my stomach and fired the first round. Luckily, his angle was off and it only grazed my stomach. Unluckily, I had my left hand tucked against my left side and the round passed through my palm and out the base of my thumb at my wrist.

I continued turning toward him while lowering my pistol to return fire, which evidently put the right hand directly in the line of fire as he squeezed off another round.
Quickest and most effective shot for the good guy is when the bad guy is at five o'clock, to hold the right arm akimbo with the pistol upside down and fire point blank into the upper-leg, lower torso of the bad guy. Then move toward 11 o'clock while turning and firing. Some guns won't fire if the muzzle is pushed point blank into a hard object like a belt buckle, bag of loot, another weapon, etc.
The good guy did well to get as far as he did.
 

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Here is an additional related thread

CCW Holder in Shooting Used a DW CBOB - 1911Forum

both this and the original are worth reading, as well as a follow up by LEO and .mil as to their experiences.

The OP had not had any formal defensive firearms training. He is planning to do this now as soon as he heals. While I applaud this, I would also suggest hand to hand/knife etc. In the very close range with the BG at 5 o'clock, a non-firearms related strategy may have prevented anyone getting shot.

In addition it underscores the value of deep concealment. Part of the reason the situation escalated was the BG finding the victims empty holster (he had drawn and was hiding his gun at that point). Again it may have been just a simple robbery had the BG not suspected a firearm in the vicinity.
 

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I've personally never been comfortable with carrying behind me (SOB or 5 o'clock). I don't like the thought of my firearm behind me for many reasons. Just my personal preference. At the most, I sometimes carry at 3 o'clock and mostly at 2. I would prefer 11 o'clock for a crossdraw with my right hand, but it is impossible to sit down without having to adjust. 2 o'clock seems to work for me.

I was just thinking as I read the story if the guy had his IWB towards his front he could have drawn his weapon as he was walking with his back towads the BG. Another option given his circumstance was a weak hand shot when the BG was at his 5 position (under his right arm/elbow). You can't prepare for every possible scenario. Glad he's alive to tell the story. Scary stuff.
 

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Also underscores the value of the revolver. OP thought he had a jam, though it was because he could engage the grip safety after being shot in the hand. Revolver procedure for a click instead of bang is pretty simple. Even though I practice autoloader malfunction clearance, it will never be as fast as just pulling the trigger again. Of course, if you get to reload time, it's the other way around, so as always. YMMV.
 

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I don't have any experience with snap caps.. are they as loud as regular bullets? And where can you usually find them?
Snap caps are dummy ammunition which have a buffer for the firing pin to hit, so there's no bang, just a 'snap'. It would sound the same as dry firing without anything in the firearm, but provides a little extra cushion for the pin. In most firearms, many argue that they're fine to dry fire and snap caps aren't necessary, but personally, I use them as much as I can.

As for the story, very scary. This is the second story where I've heard of someone being injured in the shooting hand had difficulty with the grip safety. It makes me wonder about that...everything I own with a grip safety requires so little pressure to deactivate it, I can't imagine even being able to hold a pistol without putting enough pressure on it. Any insights?
 

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Thanks, cj! Had no idea.. figured the "snap" was in reference to a smaller noise. Apparently not, haha.
 
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