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I inherited my grandfather's Marlin Model 65 (same as the 60 but made exclusively for OTASCO stores in 1968) It has always had feeding issues ever since I was a teenager. The CCI High Velocity Mini-Mags give it the least amount of trouble, only having about one or two jams per 18-round feeder tube load. The feeding issue is the bullet catching the edge of the chamber and thereby jamming at an angle. I want to make this as reliable as possible because it is amazingly accurate with the stock iron sights.

Since the bolt had that gritty feel to it I figured that my grandfather never cleaned it so I found a good field strip guide and did so. Whoa, the ammount of caked on powder and lead was amazing. There where slivers of copper and lead all inside taking up any space it could due to all the misfeeds. So about 2 hours later I had finally gotten down to bare metal and the bolt slides in the receiver nice and smooth. However, when cocking it to arm the firing pin, it still feels a little gritty and there is more resistance. Once the firing pin is under tension though, the bolt moves quite smoothly.

Anyone have any experience as to what I probably missed during the cleaning? I haven't fired it since I cleaned it Monday night but will do so this weekend to see if the cleaning helped the feeding issue.
 

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I have a glenfield 60 Its not the smoothest ever but I replaced the recoil buffer cause it was cracked and pieces of plastic kept getting into the trigger.

How did you clean it also? Try using gun blast or non chlorinated brake cleaner. Hose it down you would be suprised how filthy the hammer and disconnect parts can get. I wouldn't recomend taking the trigger assy down as its a pain in the butt to re assemble.

Hope that helps you.
 

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Yes, I believe my issue is somewhere in the trigger assembly where all the springs are (except for the recoil spring). I am not going to attempt to take that apart. Hoppe's 9 and some elbow grease got all the crud out without a problem as far as the bolt and receiver go. The extractor slots on the sides of the barrel had the most chunks of metal in them.

So we're down to the trigger assembly as far as I can tell. I will hose it down as you suggest.
 

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I have a Glenfield Marlin 60 (1968) and also use Break Free Powder Blaster to clean the trigger assembly. It’s effective and much easier than disassembly.
 

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A big glass jar with solvent And let it soak a week. Then use toothpicks to remove the crud that didn't just rinse out. The solvent will settle and the clean stuff can be poured off into another pickle jar.
The solvent can be an industrial type such as CRC 5-56, WD 40, or even plain kerosene [#2 fuel]. A non-flammable solvent is best.:wink:
 
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