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The only time I formally qualified during my twelve years in the Navy was in Boot Camp in San Diego with an M1 Garand in 1963 and in Marine Advanced Infantry Training at Camp Pendleton in 1969 before going to Viet Nam as an advisor.

I had to qualify once a year during ten years in the Army National Guard with the M-16 and the 1911. I would count my hits until I qualified Expert Marksman and then alternate shots to my friend's targets on either side of me to help them qualify.
 

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I personally know the Coast Guard Chief Master at Arms firearms instructor who is responsible for all the training for all USCG personnel from Pascagoula MS to Ft. Walton FL. That does not sound like any of the firearms training they do at our FOP range. He is a former Texas Police Officer & Range master Instructor prior to going full time USCG. Just like any agency they have some really excellent shooters and some adequate shooters but nothing like what Old Chap described! I wished some of their armed Master at Arms shooters had been present during the active shooter incident at Pensacola NAS this past year!
 

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When I had my Navy firearms training, they gave us a Mossberg 500 shotgun with 5 rounds of 00 Buckshot and told us to hit a "target" at least once (4 rounds in the magazine and they had us "combat load" one round. The "target" was a 4' x 8' sheet of cardboard on a mound that was probably about 10 yards away (if that).
 

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At two of the training courses I took, we attempted to shoot from moving vehicles on dry land. Even though we were moving at extremely slow speed, I found it extremely difficult to get good hits. Very tough to do without a lot of practice.
I am glad someone brought the experience of shooting while moving. And you were shooting at stationary targets. Having had that experience, referencing an earlier thread:

You have just parachuted out of a burning plane and you are wounded. How hard do you think it would be if you were dropping at 17 mph in a parachute and shooting with a 1911 at a Japanese plane going by at 70 mph? What is the likelihood you would hit the pilot in the forehead with one of four rounds?
 

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I am glad someone brought the experience of shooting while moving. And you were shooting at stationary targets. Having had that experience, referencing an earlier thread:

You have just parachuted out of a burning plane and you are wounded. How hard do you think it would be if you were dropping at 17 mph in a parachute and shooting with a 1911 at a Japanese plane going by at 70 mph? What is the likelihood you would hit the pilot in the forehead with one of four rounds?
If you have a million monkeys in parachutes shooting 1911s at Japanese planes, somebody will eventually hit one of the pilots...
 

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If you have a million monkeys in parachutes shooting 1911s at Japanese planes, somebody will eventually hit one of the pilots...
Just keep the monkeys away from typewriters.
 

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The pistol training looked okay except Mrs OldChap commented that they must be shooting 44 Magnums - the guns, almost every one shown, flipped from 3 o'clock to nearly 12 o'clock under recoil. And nope...those were 9mm Sigs.
I’ve never seen the show and hadn’t shot in the CG for many years, but they were likely shooting the .40S&W Sig P229DAK. A lot of new shooters have trouble with the double action DAK trigger. I never had to qualify on it. I think the switch to the .40 Sig P229-DAK was in 2004-2005.




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Doesn't surprise me at all. As with anything if you don't practice you'll suck at it. Most of the Coasties I know were/are not gun nuts.
The only training I had on how to shoot was in boot camp, covered the basic safety rules and sight alignment and not much else as I recall. I already knew how to shoot, I qualified expert rifle (196/200!) and marksman pistol. I later was able to shoot for score again which in my experience is rare and qualified expert in pistol, don't recall that score. I did go to a LE course in about '78 where they taught us how to fast draw :rolleyes: a 1911 from a snapped flap holster! We carried in Condition Stupid (full mag, empty chamber) and had to slingshot the slide as we came up to align the sights.
The rest of my career we only shot to qualify for boarding team which was initially annual then semi and I think quarterly when I retired. No formal training was given but if someone didn't qualify whoever was running the range would take them aside and give them suggestions.
Bottom line, like some police departments the only time some (most?) of them shoot is to qualify.

Regarding what they carry, as Bob said above we went to Sig in 2005. The GM had his office in my building, when we switched he had to run 100 rds through each pistol. He asked for volunteers to shoot so I put 100 though one and was not impressed with it. I was impressed with the mobile range! A 18 wheeler trailer with 3 lanes in it and a "quiet" vestibule. Sweet set up.
 

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[
Some distinctions:
  • USCG Boarding Officer Course (BOC): 23 days
  • USCG Boarding Team Member (BTM) Course: 9 days
  • USCG MSRT training: 8 weeks
  • Navy VBSS training: 8 weeks
Also, even though VBSS are volunteers, they are screened for attitude and fitness and get ongoing training. The ROE differences are that MSRT and VBSS can do operations against hostile targets. Boarding teams cannot.
MSRT is a unit, not a shipboard assignment. Their initial training May be 8 weeks but they get plenty more after.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Just keep the monkeys away from typewriters.
Who cares about typewriters? Keep 'em away from POLITICS...we've got enough Looney Tunes folks sippin' at the public trough.

Back on topic...I wish I had recorded that episode. I'm certainly not being critical, just concerned. If that was accurate, maybe it was being nervous by the presence of the camera. I could understand that. And I suspect most of you have heard my thoughts on a new class of police cadets on the range for the first time is several thousand times more hazardous than a tour of duty in Afghanistan. Sadly, we have forgotten to teach our children the first necessary skill of survival. How to shoot.

@CWOUSCG Thanks for your insight and service, brother.
 
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