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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been practicing appendix draw, and I noticed that once in a great while my Defender 9mm will yank the holster up and be very difficult to draw. I quickly diagnosed the problem - the ejector port is so sharp on the top that it was actually catching and digging into the kydex!

Ever have this happen?

Part of the problem is that sometimes I may pivot the gun slightly in the holster, causing the ejection port, as the gun is withdrawn, to dig into the kydex. So I sanded down the divots in the kydex holster, and then I had to round the port.

Here's the port before rounding. Notice the trace of kydex on the top of the receiver from the port; that's normal, but at the port edge the edge would sometimes dig right into the kydex. Like all Colts, this was a sharp edge (although it does not look it in the photo):

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The next two photos are the port slightly rounded, and then after a cold blue:
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This is a carry gun, so I'm not concerned about the slight cosmetic blemish. I just wish Colt would take a few minutes and soften the edges of their guns. My first Defender was even sharper than this one, and my Commander nearly shaved leather from a holster. Blunting stainless is easy, but a blued gun needs a little cosmetic attention after rounding an edge.

I may round the hammer edges next, so they don't cut through my shirts.

Come on, Colt! Two minutes is all it would take!
 

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I like Colts but this is the main reason I have slowly gotten rid if them. I can't stand all the sharp edges.

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Anything requires a bit of break in.

If there were kydex shavings on your gun, enough draws would have corrected the problem naturally.
 

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I know nothing about Colt 1911s, but as far as sharp stuff on their revolvers, I have a new production Colt Cobra, a .38 snubbie.

I haven’t shot 12 rounds out of it, as it hurts like hell. Not the recoil, but the recoil combined with the SORRY design and fit and finish of the grips.
Very sharp diamond pattern on the wood grips. They did NOTHING to tame them. It appears it they were never touched by finish sandpaper. THEN they totally screwed up (IMO), how they put the golden dancing pony medallions on the grips.

The medallions should sit pretty flush on the grips. NOPE. They are way deep into the holes in the grips. AND the holes are not finish sanded, but sharp as hell.

What that does is capture the flesh of ones palms, and under recoil hurt like the blazes. I honestly thought I had torn the flesh of my shooting hand badly after the first shot. I was planning to get the first aid kit, it was that bad.

I can sand wood, but I will be darned if I do. I will stick with my S&Ws.


 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Anything requires a bit of break in.

If there were kydex shavings on your gun, enough draws would have corrected the problem naturally.
More than shavings. Digging into the kydex and lifting the holster up and seriously impeding the draw.

Perhaps the kydex would have broken in with enough shaving, but that may lead to a break in the kydex. And if I'm under an adrenalin rush when I really need to use it, I don't want it to have any chance of snagging.
 

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I have to agree with PEF. This lack of attention to detail is unacceptable in a gun in which the purpose is defensive carry.
 
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I sympathize. In the 90s I bought an Springfield Armory Ultra Compact V-10 that was so sharp in places I cut myself on it twice when merely handling it. I bought it to carry, but never got it even close to being reliable.
 

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I would likely build up some masking around the points of contact on the gun, re-heat the offending areas of the holster to remold the kydex up and off the gun.
 

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Nothing wrong with what you did. I would have done the same.
Blue Wonder is the best "cold blue" system for blending touch-ups on blued firearms but, I wouldn't invest in that for one such minor modification.
Any cold blue would do.<~~Hey...I'm a poet and don't even know it.
I would do the same on the hammer next if it is chewing little holes in your shirts.
 

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Nothing wrong with what you did. I would have done the same.
Blue Wonder is the best "cold blue" system for blending touch-ups on blued firearms but, I wouldn't invest in that for one such minor modification.
Any cold blue would do.<~~Hey...I'm a poet and don't even know it.
I would do the same on the hammer next if it is chewing little holes in your shirts.
When I carried at three o'clock, everything I carried eventually chewed or wore little holes in my shirts. It took a period of years, but it happened. I've only been carrying appendix for a couple years, and I've only been in my current supply of shirts for about that long, but no pinholes yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As for adjusting the kydex, that's a skill I don't have. My concern is I'd ruin the holster, or the shell would deform and not offer adequate retention.

The other nit I have, this time with holsters, are the metal tabs on metal clips. Those cut though shirts, especially if during a drive a seat belt is pressing the shirt against the metal tab. I will either cut the tab down, sand it smooth and cover it in black duct tape, or swap out with plastic j hooks. I don't like the j-hooks all that much, they add bulk, but they spare the shirts. The duct tape solution is not optimal, as I periodically need to replace the tape. What I would like to see are metal hooks with a shorter tab and the end covered in plastic.

Perhaps I could cut the metal tab and then cover it in the mixed epoxy glue that dries hard, or maybe even JB weld? Anyone have similar problems with the metal tabs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
When I carried at three o'clock, everything I carried eventually chewed or wore little holes in my shirts. It took a period of years, but it happened. I've only been carrying appendix for a couple years, and I've only been in my current supply of shirts for about that long, but no pinholes yet.
You carry a Shield, correct? The difference for the Defender is the combat hammer in cocked & locked. The edges of the hammer face can are often not rounded, creating surface that can quickly rub away cotton.

These are really minor inconveniences, and easily fixable. The problem is me, as I've purchased so many damn Defenders that the work starts to add up.
 

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You carry a Shield, correct? The difference for the Defender is the combat hammer in cocked & locked. The edges of the hammer face can are often not rounded, creating surface that can quickly rub away cotton.

These are really minor inconveniences, and easily fixable. The problem is me, as I've purchased so many damn Defenders that the work starts to add up.
I carried an Ultra-Carry II for awhile, and yes, that hammer made short work of cotton fabric. The Glocks and Smith and Wessons had a similar effect, simply over a greater time span. I never carried a 1911 appendix, but imagine it would still have a similar effect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I don't think this is a lack of workmanship. It's just that Colts have always had sharp edges. My Dad's old Colt Agent revolver from 1982 has a hammer that one could shave with.

It seems like the sharp edges is a "Colt Thing."
 

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No issues with my Colts and leather holsters.
 
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"Anyone have similar problems with the metal tabs?"

^^^I had some issues with the metal tabs snagging clothing and the only thing that really lasted for any time was to drill several small holes in the ends of the metal tabs and coat both sides with a 2 part epoxy. The holes allow the epoxy to seep though and bond together, so it doesn't eventually start sliding off. It also allowed me to "build up" the ledge of the tab so it would not ride up onto the belt and sometimes come off /over the belt on draws. I eventually stopped buying holsters with metal tabs and went to plastic tabs instead.
 

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No issues all have sharp ejection ports though I use leather. I also dislike melted 1911s personally the lines should be nice and square. If someone wants one easy modification to make. Based on you saying it was only doing this when the gun was pivoted I’d say it was a combination of poor fitment and technique.
 
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