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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is the story. I just bought a new 9mm and retired my tried and true Firestorm .380 with its 7 month old Corbon DPX ammo. I planned on using up that ammo along with some other "old" stock ammo I had laying around at a local shooting match this past weekend. However my new S&W 3913 came in earlier that I expected so I used that in place of my .380. Boy am I glad I did. After the match I went home and decided to go ahead and shoot up my old carry ammo. Keep in mind that I depended on these rounds for 6-7 months. I fired the 1st 3 rounds and upon firing the 4th I felt something that I can only describe as odd. I have never experienced a squib load before but I knew something just wasn't right. I broke down the weapon and sure enough there was a 90 grain DPX round half way down my barrel. It was a very good thing that I was using slow fire and not the rapid fire that shooting .380 in a steel match requires. Otherwise I would be typing with 8 fingers right now instead of 10. The round is still jammed in the barrel I could not get it out, so it will go into the smith in the morning and Corbon will get an unhappy letter from me. It should not matter that I carried this ammo for 6-7 months it should still fire and not threaten my life. I have the last four rounds and was able to find two of the fired cases. I am debating sending the left over ammo with my unhappy letter. Anyway the pictures are posted below. I thought I'd see what you guys thought.

BTW I do not have the lot number for the ammo



 

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The very reason a lot of individuals carry a back up weapon. Anything made by the hand of man is likely to fail and always at some inopportune moment.:)
 

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The very reason a lot of individuals carry a back up weapon. Anything made by the hand of man is likely to fail and always at some inopportune moment.:)
I dunno... A lot of people here feel there is absolutely NO reason what so ever to carry a back-up weapon! I guess they all have crystal balls or something. :rofl:

I'm not of that opinion. I always have a BUG or two.

Datsun40146 Very glad you weren't injured! +1 for paying attention to what was going on with the gun and noticing the squib!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advice JD I will keep that in mind. I know my arms should be extended with my elbows locked in the proper 'weaver" stance, but my stance works just fine. My right arm is locked with the left acting as support.
 

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I have no exp. with Corbon but squib rounds in factory ammo by
major manufacturers are exceedingly rare.

Still , crap happens - lucky you caught it. :yup:
 

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It will happen with any ammo if you do not ensure that you dry the face of the slide, dry the firing pin, and the chamber after cleaning and oiling. It can cause the primer to only partially ignite and fail to ignite the powder.

This can occur with most of the penetrating oils, especially if you use the same rounds, kept in the chamber for say......7 months!

Is the copper jacket on your bullets corroded/hazed? The picture looks like it, but photos can be deceptive.
 

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Thanks for the advice JD I will keep that in mind. I know my arms should be extended with my elbows locked in the proper 'weaver" stance, but my stance works just fine. My right arm is locked with the left acting as support.
Elbow cocked or locked is a different issue. You need to use a wrap around grip with both hands, not the teacup as mentioned above. You can still cock the elbow with a proper grip. Your grip should look like this. See how you can't even see the trigger or even the trigger guard? Now compare to your photo.



Watch this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa50-plo48
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I didn't keep the same round chambered for 7 months they were rotated often as I went to the range or to compete. I knew my grip wasn't standard I'll have to work on that next range trip. Thanks for the advice!

BTW how much should I expect to pay to have that round removed?
 

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Glad you didn't blow the gun up! :gah:

+1000 on trying out the "thumbs forward" grip and ditching the "teacup" grip, it has worked phenomenally well for me. Takes a little getting used to, but now it's seconds nature for me when I pick up my SIGs and HK.
 

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I have had a squib round before and used a wooden dowel rod and mallet to drive the bullet out. If you are uneasy about it though you should take it to a smith.
Glad you noticed and are ok, good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I tried knocking it out with one of the steel cleaning rods I have, no dice. That round is really in there.
 

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I had a friend buy a new box of Corbon at the range, and he went out to try it. One of the rounds was a squib, but the staff were able to drive it out with a wooden dowel. He was shooting a revolver, and the bullet jammed between the cylinder and barrel; the gun was basically locked up! That is a scary thought with premium self-defense ammo.
 

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It will happen with any ammo if you do not ensure that you dry the face of the slide, dry the firing pin, and the chamber after cleaning and oiling. It can cause the primer to only partially ignite and fail to ignite the powder.

This can occur with most of the penetrating oils, especially if you use the same rounds, kept in the chamber for say......7 months!

Is the copper jacket on your bullets corroded/hazed? The picture looks like it, but photos can be deceptive.
Horsehockey. This is an urban shooting myth that won't die. You would have to spray oil or solvents directly into the primer or open case mouth to have any negative effect on either primer or powder.

Take a look at the following for the truth.

The Box O' Truth #39 - Oil Vs. Primers - Page 1

I don't have any published results, but a couple of friends and I did the same thing about 20 years ago with exactly the same results as the BOT.

You are correct about a dry chamber and rounds, but not for the reason you mentioned. Oil on a case or inside the chamber can cause the case not to properly grip the chamber walls as the case expands during firing, resulting in the case setting back against the bolt/slide face.
 

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I tried knocking it out with one of the steel cleaning rods I have, no dice. That round is really in there.
A cleaning rod is WAY too flexible and too small in diameter. You want a hardwood dowel or brass rod that is a slip fit into the barrel, inserted from the chamber end. The barrel should be in a vice. It shouldn't take more than a few taps with a hammer to drive the bullet out.
 

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Send a copy of the funsmith/s bill to Corbon with a demand that they reimburse you. Also tell them that you discussed it here and learned of another member with a squib round and ask if their quality control is really that shoddy!
 

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Doesn't really pertain to this situation but I'll throw this out anyway since we're discussing removal of a stuck bullet.

If you stick a bullet with a pointed nose in a rifle (or pistol for that matter), DO NOT use a wooden dowel and try and drive it out from the muzzle end. The pointed bullet will drive into the wooden dowel like a splitting wedge into a log and you'll end up with the bullet and dowel both stuck in the barrel. For this reason, I like to use only a brass rod to drive out a stuck bullet.

Hoss
 
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