Defensive Carry banner
1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,919 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had to box up my Dillon reloading system when we moved back in 07 and never got around to setting it up again. It's been shrink wrapped and boxed for 9 years. Now I've finally got a workshop and space to set it up again and get back into it. I've got a couple thousand rounds of brass and bullets in 9mm,.44 & .45 along with primers still boxed up, but will need to restock powder and other related supplies. But I'm wondering, just out of curiosity mainly, what the cost of reloading is now, compared to buying factory loads. I just bought some over the counter Federal 9mm & 45 auto at .24 & .35 per round. That sure seems cheap. My reloading log book is also still boxed with the other stuff so I'm not sure what the cost per round was back when I was actively reloading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,551 Posts
Since you are experienced, you know you're reloading premium ammo and comparing to plinking price.
Don't forget how relaxing reloading is as you focus on the task without distraction.
Reloading is more than $$$, it's another part of shooting.
But you already know that.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,726 Posts
Check out this calculator.

Handloading Cost Calculator

I recently calculated it cost me about $.13 @, or $13.00/100, using my old brass. That's for 124gr 9mm plated bullets. YCMV

The best price I have seen at a local gun show was $9.00/50, or $18.00/100.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
I don't even mess with 9mm or 5.56. I can get the ammo cheaper or the same price as the components. I've no use for premium ammo in either of those cartridges. Unless 62gr Green Tip is premium. :)
My 38special, 357, 30-30, etc are different, non-military or retired military cartridges make a lot of sense to reload. In 38spl I can reload about $10 cheaper than store bought, $15 if we are talking defensive ammo.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,240 Posts
Here's what happens when you reload...
it usually cost less than half of factory reloads.

You wont really save money, you'll just shoot twice as much as you did before for the same price. At the very least.
Then,once you realize that you can shoot what you brought with you because you are already set up to reload, you'll no longer have any inhibitions about shooting ALL of your ammo at one sitting...especially with the Dillon because you know that you reload 500+ rounds per hour.

If you start tailoring your loads or your long guns, you probably wont buy factory ammo any more. You'll shoot more rifle because you know that you can reload more of it when you shoot yourself dry.

Its a viscous cycle that never ends once you get into it. Instead of buying factory ammo, you'll start buying bullets and cases in bulk as well as powder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,437 Posts
Most of my reloads I do today are for long range rifle shooting. I can't buy ammo that will do what my ammo does at long range. As for me, it's cheaper to run my reloads. :yup:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,957 Posts
I just started loading, only 9mm right now, and did the calculations last week. It puts me right at half the cost of the cheapest brass case factory new ammo I could find on Ammoseek. I haven't run the numbers on the other pistol caliber I'll be loading yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,727 Posts
I'm sort of stuck with (2) Dillon SDB and (1) RL550 thus it seems appropriate to use them on occasion. I batch load one thousand rounds at a time of 9mm-Luger and 45ACP. When I regularly shot across the course match's I reloaded all my match rifle ammunition. Because I have the equipment which has paid for its self thru usage, yes its economical to reload.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,840 Posts
What Hotguns said! Plus you can develop loads specific to each gun.

I think I've told this story before but here tis again! :smile: I had 2 consecutive numbered revolvers, Ruger Security Sixes. One was my Dad's but he wanted something else so we traded. I had a nice easy shooting practice load for mine, grouped less than 6" @ 25 yds. Tried that same load in my Dad's and it was like it had an improved cylinder choke! Ended up developing 2 different loads for those guns.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wizard7mm08

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,497 Posts
I used to reload but haven't in years. The answer IMO depends on what calibers you reload. .44 mag, .44 spl, and .45lc are definitely worth reloading for as well as some more obscure calibers. These days I shoot mostly .223 and 9mm. I can never seem to find even half my brass for either caliber. Factoring purchasing brass for these calibers it's just as cheap to buy bulk vs reloading. I don't own any 7.62 x 39 but that is another caliber not worth reloading IMO due to inexpensive bulk ammo.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Puros_bran

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
I helped a buddy load up some 9mm rounds with Nosler 115gr hollow points, We ran the math at 26 cents a round with used brass. Best price in town is 22 cents for a FMJ, and a factory hollow point would be about 80 cents a round.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,156 Posts
HotGuns captures the crux of reloading: you shoot a lot more for the same money.

Once you're set up, and assuming you have the brass, the biggest cost of reloading is the bullets.

I currently load .45 ACP at 16.5 cents a round, and 9mm at 10.7 cents. That's using Titegroup at $150/8 pounds, primers at $130/5000, 200 gr SWC Billy Bullets at $103/K and Berry's 124 gr plated RN at $68/K.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,140 Posts
I reload for economy. I only reload 38 SPL, 44 Mag and 9mm Luger. I can save a lot of money reloading the revolver cartridges and I can afford to shoot them. If I had to spend the money on factory rounds my revolvers wouldn't get shot much. I can save a bit of money on 9mm reloads but don't concentrate on that caliber because I don't save as much and my time is worth something.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StormRhydr

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,088 Posts
As the other's said , generally reloading is cheaper, how much really depends on the caliber, what type of load you're putting together and whether you buy in bulk or not.

Gasmitty's 100% correct, the biggest cost is your bullets, but in a way they're also your biggest savings over factory ammo.

Some calibers the savings are marginal, such as 9mm and .223, IF you're putting together basic plinking or practice stuff. Get into match or anything with a premium bullet and the savings go up significantly, same as with the "low-density" calibers. For instance I can barely beat 9mm and .223 if bought in bulk, with the standard practice bullets, but my savings on 357Sig or .243 with 105 grain Berger match bullets is pretty significant. Any premium bullet and the savings seems to go up almost exponentially.

For instance right now I'm loading a .243 Berger 105 grain hybrid in my Ruger RPR, I get the bullets for .385 per, about .08 for powder, and .06 for a benchrest primer. My brass is annealed regularly and only bump/neck-sized (read good longevity) the closest factory ammo I can get with this load is $38.99 per 20 (before delivery). So that's:

Factory $1.94 per round
Handloads: about .53 cents a round for a load that's tailored to my rifle.

Guys will mention the cost of labor, which should be factored in, everything has an opportunity cost. But in my case, IF I wasn't reloading, cleaning brass, etc. chances are I'd be watching the tube or positing chit on the internet.

Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,771 Posts
It costs me about half as much as factory ammo, and I make better ammo. I dont shoot more, I just have a bigger stockpile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,340 Posts
Factor in when the stores run out,, like in '08 you can still shoot providing you stocked up on primers & powder. I cast alot of my boolits
I shoot so when supplies are low I can blast away ; )
H/D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,443 Posts
I always enjoy these reloading threads. My uncle exposed me to reloading when I was a kid on a Dillon turret. I remember our first time and my Dad hanging over my shoulder telling me to stop and let him have a turn. I kept cranking. Uncle told Dad to stand down and let me finish the lot. He could load the next lot.

I've never pursued reloading on my own but it will be a good fit when I do - some day . . . sinking into retirement oblivion with a Super Blackhawk and some .44 spl. :yup:
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top