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What makes a safe holster, safe?

What makes a dangerous holster, dangerous?

What's the difference between a "good" holster and a "bad" one?

Discuss...

pax
 

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What makes a safe holster, safe?

What makes a dangerous holster, dangerous?

What's the difference between a "good" holster and a "bad" one?

Discuss...

pax
I can only give you my opinion but I saw a holster the other day that was a horrible idea (in my opinion). It was a "Wallet Holster" for an LCP. It had a hole cut out the same size as the trigger guard and left the trigger totally open.

To me a good holster secures the weapon, protects the trigger and is comfortable to wear everyday.
 

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Gun retention is the primary purpose for a holster.

If it fails in that, then it is dangerous.

Although it is secondary, comfort and ease of use is important.

You dont want the gun to slip out of the holster when driving, bending,moving a bunch or doing much in the way of physical activity.

For most people the difference between a good holster and a bad one is comfort. The cheapo 5 dollar nylon holsters will work but they arent nearly as secure or comfortable as a tight fitting holster on a proper belt. Some people, after wearing an elcheapo for any amount of time, cant beleive the difference when they finally can afford a well fitting holster.

Well fitting means the fit to your body, as well as the fit to the gun. Your better made holsters have enough tension in them that just the fit to the gun is enough to retain it, same with a molded Kydex. Usually you can turn the holster upside down and it will retain the gun, yet it is easy to draw if needed.
 

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Holster should cover the trigger
Should securely hold the gun...it shouldn't just fall out when tilted upside down
Should be durable
Should be easy to access the gun (no difficult to work straps or retention mechanisms)
Should not have anything for the trigger to catch on when reholstering

Should have a milt sparks stamp on it :D ...kidding....but MS makes great holsters.
 

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As I am entering the world of quality holsters and belts, I have realized that most of what i have used till now have been "bad holsters", nylon junk that doesn't conceal well (making this a potentially dangerous also, as it can give you away), and inexpensvie leather holsters that lose retention properties quickly (and again becoming potentially dangerous...ie dropping your firearm). What I have learned after buying a AKJ concealco iwb holster for my j-frame, a UBG canute for the XDsc I used to own, and a bullhide belt from beltman is that the proper gear must be used to safely carry and conceal your firearm(s), no matter your activity, as HotGuns mentions in his post. So, retention and support (good belt) is the first priority, followed by comfort.


I must add that I have always considered carrying a handgun stuffed in the waistband without a holster to be a dangerous carry method.
 

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I've also been too scared to ever just stuff a gun in my pants. I have two friends who do it, and I can't convince them to buy holsters. I might just buy them an Uncle Mikes or something.
 

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Well, having a holster with the trigger not covered does not always make for a "dangerous" holster.

Example: A Colt Single Acton Army needs to have the hammer manually cocked before it will fire so if the hammer is not cocked and the SAA is holstered - it does not matter what contacts the trigger.

Example: A Colt 1911 with the safety engaged and a secondary grip safety does not need to have the trigger guard covered if the thumb safety is engaged and the grip safety is not depressed.
 

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I have a box of bad holsters in my garage. They either fit poorly, retain poorly, or conceal poorly and a number of them do all of the above. I have a good collection of holsters in a drawer in my house that are the total opposites of the turkeys in the garage. These I consider to be good holsters as well as safe holsters and they are the ones I use for my concealed carry purpose.
 

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If im not mistaken in NC, holsters that do not cover the trigger are illegal (ie. pocket holsters with holes for an exposed trigger. I used to carry my P3AT in a pocket holster and it worked very well but i couldnt get past the fact that it was pointing at my family or others when sitting down. Not cool in my opinion. Safe holsters will hold the gun snug with absolute minimum chance of it sliding out even while upside down.
 

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A few that come to mind...

-What makes a safe holster, safe?
- What makes a dangerous holster, dangerous?
Safe is my following list, dangerous is what doesn't adhere to this list:
It retains the firearm well for its carry method.
It prevents the firearm from being fired while holstered.
It does not require additional 'fiddling' as part of its function (e.g. the holsters they force pilots to use, requiring a lock to be used with the holster itself is NOT safe).
It does not protrude into the trigger guard beyond possibly latching the very front edge.

- What's the difference between a "good" holster and a "bad" one?
Good is safe, and is easy to use with standard holster-draw training (e.g. no special gimmicks or extra movements or motions necessary to draw).
Good allows a full grip while drawing.
For me, good allows easy, safe reholstering without requiring both hands, or having to look to see that everything's lined up just right.
Good is snag free, so that no little extra sticky-outy bits might somehow get into the trigger guard while pushing downward to reholster.
 

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Well, having a holster with the trigger not covered does not always make for a "dangerous" holster.

Example: A Colt Single Acton Army needs to have the hammer manually cocked before it will fire so if the hammer is not cocked and the SAA is holstered - it does not matter what contacts the trigger.

Example: A Colt 1911 with the safety engaged and a secondary grip safety does not need to have the trigger guard covered if the thumb safety is engaged and the grip safety is not depressed.
+1

I have a K frame holster that has an open trigger guard.
 
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