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this is a rhetorical question of cause but I am just interested what other people think never the less.
so, do you think that you need any training when you buy your first firearm ever?
and if so I'd lie to know what kind you guys thin is best (for the new guy)
and if you already have a firearm and do train,.how often do you really make it t the range and how competent you do feel with our EDC.
 

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Everyone needs training beginning with your first gun. Finding the right training can be difficult but is the most important part of training. Fortunately I have several good choices here in Florida. I started with a combined intro to handguns/CCW course. Then advanced CCW. Then advanced handgun and carbine. Now have 6 full day courses on the schedule. 3 for handgun, 3 for carbine. So training is not a one time thing but continuous--really can't have too much training. The latest offered at my gun club and reasonably priced.
 

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this is a rhetorical question of cause but I am just interested what other people think never the less.
so, do you think that you need any training when you buy your first firearm ever?
and if so I'd lie to know what kind you guys thin is best (for the new guy)
and if you already have a firearm and do train,.how often do you really make it t the range and how competent you do feel with our EDC.
One practices at the range, with skills they acquired in training. There's a difference between training and practicing.
 

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One practices at the range, with skills they acquired in training. There's a difference between training and practicing.
Thank you, Brownie, for pointing this out. Words have meaning and "training" has been bandied about for far too long on firearms forums when "practice" is what is intended.

Mentors are great if one has access to them, paid or otherwise. I'd have hated to have gone it alone without them, whether they be my dad or other close relatives slapping me up 'side the head early on when I was mishandling a gun or, later mentors who promoted the finer points of riflery, from the firing line or the bench rest.

Another tip: Go compete in something. Sample several different shooting disciplines by entering in registered matches.
 

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You really owe it to yourself to get some training.

The last thing you need to be thinking about if you ever have to pull your gun out is how to run it. Your actions need to be smooth and automatic and that only comes from proper training and lots of practice.

You might go a lifetime without and be OK. Or it could save your life.
 

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I learned to shoot a pistol the same way I learned to play golf. I bought the tools (a pistol and/or golf clubs) and started practicing/playing.

The results speak for themselves. I am a mediocre golfer and a mediocre marksman.

My advice based on my own experience is: Get training and/or lessons and you will be much better off and I suspect will find both activities more enjoyable.

As a disclaimer I grew up around long guns so I knew the basic safety rules and have never, thank goodness, had an accident of any sort. (so far)
 

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I've been shooting for nearly my entire life, but only learned to operate my carry guns effectively when instructed by shooters who could shoot and teach.
 

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so, do you think that you need any training when you buy your first firearm ever?
Do you need it? No, you don't. The owner's manual will offer all you need to use the firearm. Should you get it? Yes, definitely. Training, good and proper training, is never a bad thing to have under your belt. Take the time and make the effort to get good training before you put your firearm into service.

and if so I'd lie to know what kind you guys thin is best (for the new guy)
I think you're asking what kind of training is the best.... A qualified NRA instructor is a great start. Also there are many private companies that offer really good training at various levels from familiarization to all out SD training. Start at the beginning and work up.

and if you already have a firearm and do train,.how often do you really make it t the range and how competent you do feel with our EDC
I get to my local range every two to three weeks. And I don't just punch paper targets. I don't even use conventional targets at all. I put myself through a battery of drills to keep my skills up and to make things interesting. I don't go there just to put holes in paper. As for how competent do I feel with my carry guns? I'd say pretty darned good, but I would add that there is always room for improvement. This is a skill that requires frequent attention and there are just so many variables to consider. It's not just strapping on a sidearm and feeling like you are ready for anything. That kind of approach is dangerous. The gun is a tool. Learn to use it effectively and it can become a very valuable tool. Take it and the skills needed to use it effectively for granted and you've got an albatross on your hip.

So yes, get that training. And yes, practice as much as you are able. Learn the laws of your state as they relate to the carrying of a firearm and its use in a deadly force encounter. And never, never be cavalier about anything related to your firearm.
 

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I was raised shooting since I was 4 years old with a bb gun. I self taught myself in a lot of ways. At 10 I was given a 410 single shot shotgun. I was told to go stand on the pond dam and shoot doves. Dad said just lead them a little bit. When I was 18 and went in to the USMC they had to retrain my rifle and pistol skills. I think you need training before you buy a gun and you need to practice and have follow up training.
 

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Training is never wasted effort for anyone other than an expert who is already highly trained.
Practice can be a wasted effort if you do not already have some training. I see lots of people on the golf range who are practicing but are only ingraining bad form due to a lack of proper instruction (training).
 
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Absolutely.

If it is your first firearm, then you need more than training, you need the fundamentals of safety, how it operates, proper holster selection, self defense law study, and an entire gambit of essential knowledge.
 

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You practice until you think you're competent. Then, with (quality) training, you quickly realize that (in truth) you are...NOT. :blink:
Yes sir.

When you run across someone who tells you that they know everything there is to know about firearms and shooting, you're probably talking to a liar or a fool.
 

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A depository of information The Armed Citizen Colum in the official NRA publications. Basically articles taken from news sources covering self-defense occurrences'. The level of expertise/training is not mentioned but with that said apparently individuals muddle thru. On the other hand there are those that would argue the NRA Cherry- Picks articles of successful out comes.

So you have a right being mandated as a privilege buy requiring training as example by some states requiring a certain level of training to obtain a concealed carry weapon permit. People may argue training one way or the other its up to each individual.
 

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Just from my own experience, yes, I don't know if I'd call it training, but you need help when you first begin shooting. Safety instruction absolutely, instruction as to stance and grip, etc., definitely. Also, for me it was extremely helpful to get that instruction before I bought my first gun. Your ideas about what you should buy may change considerably if you can get some experience with a range of weapons. I was fortunate to have a friend who is now an NRA instructor who got me started and let me fire everything from a .22 to a .45. It was a real eye-opener.
 

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Dennis, you mention something important in your post. In reading this and many threads with similar topics, I've long considered that possibility. Yet, firearms folks even buy into it. It'll be a sad day if firearms rights are denied because some arbitrary level of training hasn't been met. We can all fold the big gun ownership tent and go home to coin collecting and needlework if some sort of minimum training requirements ever become a regulatory fact at the federal level. We'd better be prepared to oppose any such thing.
 

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Tricky question. Are you still in Israel? If so that totally changes the landscape of training opportunities. I don't even have a clue about what is necessary to carry a gun there. If I were in Israel and could carry I'll tell you, I'd NEVER be without!! All the training I'd suggest is here in the USA. I would think that in Israel where your enemies are all around you there would be all kinds of training available. My worry is this: are my enemies in the same class?

That said I certainly think you should get some training ASAP (as soon as possible).

Out of curiosity, what kind of firearm are you looking at? An uzi ( my atty loves his)? You could always get some training if you joined the armed services:smile:
 

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Did anyone teach you how to drive a car ? Or, did you just jump in and hope for the best ?

Learn ; safety first. shooting accurately the next, and expand knowledge and experience from there from someone either in person that knows what they are doing or a class.
 
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