Defensive Carry banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,963 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This issue has come up a few times lately. For those concerned about drawing quickly while seated in a vehicle, I would ask you consider the following.

A vehicle offers virtually no ballistic protection from incoming fire. Staying inside an immobile vehicle and attempting to fire on attackers outside the vehicle basically makes you a static target. Vehicles are “bullet magnets.” Not only do you need to worry about incoming bullets and their fragments, but you can also be injured by flying shrapnel (called “spall”) from bits of your car that go flying around inside. (This is the reason armored vehicles have “spall liners” of Kevlar-like fabric to protect the crew from ricocheting bits of shrapnel.)

Spall is also an issue from your outgoing fire, especially if you fire through your vehicle’s glass. Your own bullets will cause spall inside. Then there is the noise, the concussion, and your own hot, sharp brass flying around.

What this all means is that you should avoid trying to fight from inside an immobile vehicle at all costs. If your vehicle can’t move (you’re boxed in), get out and fight on foot. Even if you have people in the vehicle, getting out will draw fire away from them.

Instead of worrying about executing a fast draw while in your vehicle, the priority should be to practice getting out as quickly and cleanly as you can (get the seatbelt off and out of the way, open the door and brace it so it does not rebound on you as you exit).

Of course, if you can drive away from danger – do so, even if you damage your vehicle in the process. Be alert, and try to leave yourself an escape route. Remember that your escape route may involve going in reverse – quickly. Watch some combat driving training videos, and learn how to use your vehicle as a weapon – it is more powerful than any handgun.

Caveat – if you are elderly or disabled, and cannot quickly exit your vehicle, then being able to quickly draw a weapon while inside your vehicle may indeed be your only option. Otherwise, in summary:

If you see trouble coming, and can drive away – drive away!

If you see trouble coming, but cannot drive away – get out of the vehicle!

If you are caught by surprise and cannot drive away – pray, feign compliance, and get out of the vehicle. Once out, move! This is a bad scenario, but you aren’t going to outdraw an already drawn gun. Distraction, movement, guile, and luck are what is needed here.

Hope this sparks some thought…
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,703 Posts
Good post! :smile:

Caveat – if you are elderly or disabled, and cannot quickly exit your vehicle, then being able to quickly draw a weapon while inside your vehicle may indeed be your only option.
Or for any number of reasons why you can not exit the vehicle or were caught by surprise, it would be very wise to have practiced this complicated maneuver so that you can indeed exercise it immediately and effectively! :image035:

I certainly agree with the following: :yup:
If you are caught by surprise and cannot drive away – pray, feign compliance, and get out of the vehicle. Once out, move! This is a bad scenario, but you aren’t going to outdraw an already drawn gun. Distraction, movement, guile, and luck are what is needed here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
759 Posts
Shooting USA just had a Shooting Tip from Todd Jarret about shooting from inside a vehicle. Here's a link to it JARRETT4-5

Also everybody should goto the box'o'truth website and check out their tests of what happens to rounds while penetrating a vehicle. Here's a link to them The Box O' Truth - The Buick O' Truth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,067 Posts
Training to fight out of a car is easier if you are alone. The problem comes in when you have someone else with you. As the OP explained fighting from inside the car sucks. If your tactics involve things besides the use of a firearm you will hopefully have room between you and the car in front of you even if it means hopping a curb. If not you need to unass the car and take physical control if you have someone with you that cannot protect themselves.

Even removing the seat belt under this stress takes time and training. Good thread. This is where owning airsoft can be a huge benefit.- George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,421 Posts
Good advice. Thanks for the post and insight :hand10:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
50,585 Posts
10thmtm and BradyM77...both have info worth reading...thanks.:bier:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Remember that your escape route may involve going in reverse – quickly. Watch some combat driving training videos, and learn how to use your vehicle as a weapon – it is more powerful than any handgun.
This is golden advice - knowing how to back up quickly is so impotant. I learned this first hand in DC when some dude got out of his car to "talk" to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I'll add in:
1) Be mindful of when you put on your seatbelt

2) when you take off your seatbelt.

3) how you unbuckle/buckle and stow the seatbelt.

1, example, I don't know the number, but I see many people buckled in their car sitting in a parking space talking on their cell phone,etc... whith the motor running.

2, example, I usually take my seatbelt off when I pull into the parking lot. I have seen people park, remove the keys and put them in their purse,or grab gear (calculator, phone, etc.) with key in hand, THEN take off the seatbelt.

3, example, I like to unbuckle and help or guide the seatbelt to it's final position. Some people hit the release button and they get tangled in it with their gear, body, clothes, etc.. It would be much better to use the unbuckling to get a practice rep in of clearing the seatbelt than waste it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Excellent advice and thread. Always keep enough space between you and the vehicle in front of you to make a quick getaway. Faster than drawing in a dangerous situation. My F-150 4X4 has plenty of power to push most other cars out of the way if I need to.

I've switched from carrying a H&K P7 IWB to my old S&W 19 snub full time in an Alessi shoulder holster. Can draw it out with either hand if I have to.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top