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An easy and cheap way to to dry fire with instant feedback.

When I was on the 8th Army pistol team we used this method for trigger control a lot. The only difference was we'd put the dot on a piece of white paper and then tape the paper to any wall. And, yes it does work! (We used it with our .45 and .38 match weapons, the pencil didn't fit down the barrel of a .22.)
Also a recognized method of testing out your 1911 after you've taken it apart and re-assembled it to make certain all safeties work and the firing pin strikes the eraser propelling the pencil.
 

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I think its reasonable to have a very good (intuitive) idea of how and where your trigger breaks. That being said, I don't think its critically necessary that you sit around dry firing your gun. If I ever need to pull the trigger, Ill pull it. I doubt I will have any recollection of what the trigger pull was like.
If you are doing any kind of bulls eye shooting you will find that the consistent winners nearly all practice dry fire. It allows you to focus on the basics without the report or recoil. DR
 

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Smitty - I looked at the barrel blok website. After you insert the barrel blok and the included dummy round in the magazine do you then rack the slide and press the trigger? After the break do you rack the slide - if you rack the slide doesn't the dummy barrel blok round eject? Thanks
The inert round loaded into the mag has a scooped out top that prevents it from being picked up and loaded when you rack the slide. It also prevents the slide lock from engaging. Pretty cool design.


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I think its reasonable to have a very good (intuitive) idea of how and where your trigger breaks. That being said, I don't think its critically necessary that you sit around dry firing your gun. If I ever need to pull the trigger, Ill pull it. I doubt I will have any recollection of what the trigger pull was like.
Each to one's own, but for me, getting an idea of "how and where your trigger breaks" is not the point of dry fire at all. As a former competitive shooter, for me it's practicing keeping your sights lined-up on the target through the trigger pull sequence, without the distraction of recoil. It's learning to really focus on the front sight. Everyone thinks they do that, but if they really did, all their rounds would go in one ragged hole. Really focusing on the front sight is an art. Dry fire has the added advantage of getting flinching out of your muscle memory, and all but the world's greatest shooters flinch, at least a tiny bit.
 

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Anyone ever heard of the BarrelBlok? BarrelBlok
Allows for safe dry fire training with your own pistol. I have on for my G19 and like it a lot. Sent from my iPhone with Tapatalk
Each to one's own, but "safe dry fire training" is accomplished by making sure there are no rounds in the weapon, or even within reach of where you're dry firing, and checking that every time. No offense meant, but I call devices like BarrelBlock "dumb down" devices, that is devices which sacrifice good habits and procedures for convenience. Safely dry-firing without such a device reinforces gun handling procedures you need to have when you are on the range with live ammo.
 

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Since my stroke I practice dry fire alot with my 3 revolvers. I also use a lazer bore sight that I put in the cylinder to practice my draw and point both single and 2 handed.
 

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Each to one's own, but "safe dry fire training" is accomplished by making sure there are no rounds in the weapon, or even within reach of where you're dry firing, and checking that every time. No offense meant, but I call devices like BarrelBlock "dumb down" devices, that is devices which sacrifice good habits and procedures for convenience. Safely dry-firing without such a device reinforces gun handling procedures you need to have when you are on the range with live ammo.
Nothing trumps good habits, of course, but even professionals drop the ball occasionally, sometimes with tragic results. Safe gun handling is covered extensively in training for LEOs and the military, but being human trumps training, as evidenced by regular instances of ADs.

To clarify:

1) BarrelBlok in no way inhibits manual inspection of the chamber (good habit) to confirm that the firearm is unloaded. It's design allows for one's own safety check to be performed unhindered.

2) The chamber insert prevents cartridges from being loaded.

3) The insert sticks out of the barrel and provides a visual cue that it is in place.

You can't do much for someone that isn't interested in practicing safe habits. Speaking for myself, I will happily use a quality redundant safety system as a backup to my own careful procedures.


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Each to one's own, but for me, getting an idea of "how and where your trigger breaks" is not the point of dry fire at all. As a former competitive shooter, for me it's...
exactly.. I agree that the imperatives of a comp shooter is very different
 

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If you are doing any kind of bulls eye shooting you will find that the consistent winners nearly all practice dry fire. It allows you to focus on the basics without the report or recoil. DR
you are probably right.. I sometimes forget the recreational application.
 

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They are in some respects, but all kinds of shooting involve hitting the target.
Generally speaking, different values demand different methods.. If you want to spend hours dry firing your pistol, great.. I wont try and talk you out of it. At the same time (absent the competitive arena) I would consider "hours" to be well into the realm of substantially diminished returns. That's just me
 

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Generally speaking, different values demand different methods.. If you want to spend hours dry firing your pistol, great.. I wont try and talk you out of it. At the same time (absent the competitive arena) I would consider "hours" to be well into the realm of substantially diminished returns. That's just me
How is it diminished returns?

Are you saying that out of experience or opinion?

I've dry fire tens of thousands of rounds. Live fire is more fun but I learn the most from dry fire. Live fire is just the application while dry fire is the practice.

Myself and most people can't afford to shoot 1000 rounds per month. But we can all afford to dry fire 10000 rounds per month. What is the disadvantage to dry fire?


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Not to mention most ranges don't allow you to draw. I can practice drawing standing, moving and sitting in my home. I can't do those at the range. I can't practice one handed manipulations.

It takes thousands of repetitions for an action to become automatic.


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I think its reasonable to have a very good (intuitive) idea of how and where your trigger breaks. That being said, I don't think its critically necessary that you sit around dry firing your gun. If I ever need to pull the trigger, Ill pull it. I doubt I will have any recollection of what the trigger pull was like.
If all you're prepared for is to hit the center of mass from 7 yards, shooting twice a year is enough. Most cops do that.

Personally I push myself to be the best that I can be, in any endeavor I care to do. If on a calm day I can punch the 10 ring consistently from 20 yards, I stand a good chance of hitting a moving target who shoots back, all while experiencing an adrenaline dump that makes me shake. I practice dry fire every day because it's free and it works.

If I ever use my gun chances are it would be against a criminal who has the advantage of initiative. My advantage is that I practice a lot more than him, so if we open fire at the same time my chance of scoring hits is greater than his.
 

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I invested in LASR for training, and it does work good for what I wanted to use it for with lots of abilities. I eventually bought the sirt training glock to go with it.


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I invested in LASR for training, and it does work good for what I wanted to use it for with lots of abilities. I eventually bought the sirt training glock to go with it.


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Did you get the plastic or metal sirt?


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