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I have always been told... And believe that dry firing a gun is bad for it. Now as you all know the only way to disassemble a glock is to dry fire it and I have been told that glock pistols were designed to be dry fired without any damage. Is this true?

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Its a non-issue with Glocks. Perfectly safe, as it is with most modern center fire guns.
 

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Individual Glock firearms have gone many many thousands of dry fire reps during draw and presentation practice with no ill effects.
 

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Again, dry firing your Glock is just fine. No worries.
 

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Just a general note or two on dry firing. With the general shift to rebounding firing pin mechanisms, and with improved metallurgy since slightly before WWII, dry-firing centerfire guns is generally no longer a problem. I would avoid dry-firing break-action long guns (especially those that sell for more than a week's pay), but repeating guns of all sorts can safely be dry-fired without fear of hurting the gun. The most common problem with dry firing appears to be broken firing pins, but that situation has been improved with better metallurgy.

Rimfires are a different story. Unless the gun has been designed for safe dry-firing, it's probably best to err on the side of caution and not dry-fire rimfire guns indiscriminately. I can say without equivocation that every Ruger rimfire made is safe to dry fire, due to foresight in design of both firing pin and chamber. By inspection, if the breech face of the gun has a cutout in line with the firing pin on the bolt, then you can be reasonably certain that dry firing won't hurt it.
 

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Just because you've been told something doesn't mean it's true. I bet your Glock manual has something to say on the subject.
Without really getting into some hot and heavy debate since I am not a GLOCK guy and so I do not really have a dog in this fight...many shooters have dry fired their Glock pistols thousands of times without damage or incident but, GLOCK now recommends the use of Snap Caps for extensive dry firing.

This from a reply directly from GLOCK Firearms.
Generally, dry firing the Glock pistol is not a problem, however, when taken to excess, e.g., thousands of dry firings, Glock now recommends the use of snap-caps.
When taken to the extreme, the breech-face can be damaged.
 

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Just a general note or two on dry firing. With the general shift to rebounding firing pin mechanisms, and with improved metallurgy since slightly before WWII, dry-firing centerfire guns is generally no longer a problem. I would avoid dry-firing break-action long guns (especially those that sell for more than a week's pay), but repeating guns of all sorts can safely be dry-fired without fear of hurting the gun. The most common problem with dry firing appears to be broken firing pins, but that situation has been improved with better metallurgy.

Rimfires are a different story. Unless the gun has been designed for safe dry-firing, it's probably best to err on the side of caution and not dry-fire rimfire guns indiscriminately. I can say without equivocation that every Ruger rimfire made is safe to dry fire, due to foresight in design of both firing pin and chamber. By inspection, if the breech face of the gun has a cutout in line with the firing pin on the bolt, then you can be reasonably certain that dry firing won't hurt it.
thank for the info on the Ruger, I just bought a Ruger 22 and was wondering about that
 

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I heard from MSNBC that Glocks are so dangerous that each time you dry fire one somebody, somewhere in the world, dies from it. Also, I heard then when you are sleeping they will sometimes sneak out of their places and try to strangle you.

Be careful my friends.
 

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I do dry fire drills twice a week, probably around 50 trigger pulls each time - no worries, only thing to worry about is making sure IT IS unloaded. Check it, with your eye's and your finger, then put it down, pick it up and check it again, then check it again, then proceed to dry fire.
 

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I dry fire my carry gun almost weekly in practice. Sometimes it is a Glock, but most often it is a j frame. Been doing it for years without issue.
 

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There is one thing dangerous about dry fire and that is the brain. Some brains assume ass/u/me that the gun is empty and then Kaabooom. I don't argue anymore about dry fire I use a blue gun for drills. Research several years ago convinced me ND from pistols was performed with an empty gun.

Second point when you dry fire 10K times on your carry gun ask yourself would you buy a gun for carry that had been cycled 10K times and bet your life on it.

This is not to argue just to point out my one particular opinion.

Respectfully,
Bill
 

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Firearms made back before the 50's were not made to be dry fired. Recent advances in materials and designs of modern firearms can be dry fired without issues. I do not have a gun, nor do I want a gun that cannot be dry fired.

But think about this. How many times was your gun fired by people in the store that sold it? Do you worry about the internal parts being under pressure as it is cocked all the time? Some will say that weakens parts.

We often worry about things that are not something to be concerned about.
 
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The only thing that could even possibly hurt a GLOCK is kryptonite, and that hasn't been proven yet.
 

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Any modern firearms is safe to dry, anything rimfire excluded, unless it is designed for it. My solution..... I make my own snap caps. I take a fired case, drill a small hole in the side, fill it with orange melted crayon almost to the top, and top it off with a thin layer of 5 minute epoxy( and the hole in the side. I would rather spend the time to make my own than pay for something I can make. I even take them gun shopping with me, and i use them for training for failure drills. No harm no foul.
 
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