Defensive Carry banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How do EMTs handle a car wreck victim who is carrying? I'm thinking there is usually LE on the scene who would take control of the handgun, but what happens if the EMTs roll first?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
Good question. Never even thought about that. That is what I like about this forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Speaking from experience, LEO are not always on scene. The department I work for installed lock boxes on all units when cc became legal in Illinois (where I work). We have policies in place to temporarily secure a fire arm in the lock box until a LEO (who in theory is higher trained in firearms) can secure it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,686 Posts
Most of the local EMTs ARE concealed carriers. And they (usually) safely unload the handgun and store it securely until the owner recovers it or calls with verbal authorization to allow someone else (with photo ID) to pick it up. If alcohol or drug involvement is suspected in the accident, they give it to the responding LEO.

Yet I live in a very remote area. When my Momma took a fall at her home, the local Chief of Police got there seconds after I did & I had gone to school with BOTH the responding EMTs. (Gotta' love the backwoods!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,716 Posts
I think we had a couple of threads before on this, I may be wrong. I'm sure its on a case by case situation. Wither local police or the EMTs handle it depending on situation.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Skeetie96

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,508 Posts
How do EMTs handle a car wreck victim who is carrying? I'm thinking there is usually LE on the scene who would take control of the handgun, but what happens if the EMTs roll first?
I thought the correct action in California was: Scream like a little girl, then run as fast as you can while still screaming "OMG a GUN!!!"

Seriously though, it would depend on procedures in place to handle it. I would also guess it would depend on the EMT's comfort level with handling guns.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gopbert

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,270 Posts
I have no clue around here. Hope I never have to find out. But as fare as I know if a eat is on scene here and officer is also here, so I'm assuming they will take the gun. Because even are ambulances around here have stupid no gun signs on them.

Maybe they will just leave you alone once they see it because of the no gun sign...idk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
Our Med units put lock box in the trucks and they was train how to remove in most cases. And I think they also did the fire trucks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
I'd say it depends on the policy of the ambulance service.

That said, I'll relay what was taught in my EMT class put on by the ambulance service of one of the largest not for profit hospital systems in the US.

We were instructed to let law enforcement handle weapons. If no law enforcement was available we were instructed to leave the pistol holstered on the patient (assuming the patient is incapacitated or unconscious). Hospital security would deal with it upon arrival. The logic is that the pistol isn't going to hurt anyone where it is. There is a higher risk of a negligent discharge with people handling a firearm that may not be familiar with it (or guns in general).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,099 Posts
I worked a Motorcycle wreck a few weeks ago in which the victim was a concealed carrier.

I took the gun from him and locked it up in my evidence locker for safe keeping. Went to see him at the ER and informed him that either he or a responsible party could come get it where I work.

Not a big deal. He came and got it the next day. Pretty painless really. Of course, this is Arkansas. Might have been a long protracted event in some of the anti-gun regimes.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
1,639 Posts
When I was a fire fighter/EMT we would secure the gun and hand it off to LEO.
If we went into a home with visible weapons we would discreetly place one of ours between them and us just in case.
All this probably wasn't the most pro gun approach but the way it works for any emergency group as far as protection goes is in this order - Me, Us, them. The them part also includes protecting there property or making sure it is secure rather.

I was once in a auto accident and had to go to the ER, My dept was the responding dept so I just handed my gun off to one of our lieutenants who place the gun in my dept issue medical bag that was taken to the FD break room that I later picked up that night.

My old FD had some pretty bad areas and the local LEO's used to crack on us and say we was the only fire dept who issued guns along with turn out gear as there was so many on my FD that carried a gun. One other note we would disarm before going into a structure fire.

We had to low income apartment areas with regular shootings and had two family's involved in a huge feud that on a regular basis took shots at each other until they finally killed each other off or got locked up. One fired at another once and missed but the bullet killed a 70 year old man sitting in his home watching tv.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,324 Posts
I agree with GT. all the EMT's I know are concealed carriers. A few years ago the dept here paid for all of them to get permits. But, even before this, the dept had training to clear & secure a firearm.

Sometimes, they can't do this because of the condition of the patient. When, they can't secure one they pass it to a responding LEO. (Of course this is pro gun rural SC)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top