Defensive Carry banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After watching all the videos and reading different methods of removing the Glock mag base plates, I ordered some Shearer pinky extensions for my Glock 27. They are primarily to make extended shooting sessions at the range more comfortable with it. I did not get the capacity extensions as I wanted to maintain the factory spring tension.

Anyways, Stanley channel locks worked flawlessly in compressing the sides to release the little lock nubs so the base plate would slide off effortlessly. I used a center punch to push to spring plate out of the way and then used my Stanley channel locks on the 4th position. No scuff marks, no cramped hands and no damage to the original base plate. Using the 4th position prevented me from compressing the sides too much and causing any damage.

I wish I had though of this before trying all the other methods I have seen. I scratched the hell out of two of my mags struggling with them.

For the non tool savvy, below is a picture of channel locks I used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,421 Posts
:confused: I've never had to use anything to squeeze the sides in for the baseplate to come off. I just depressed the tab from the bottom of the mag and pressed the base forward.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,765 Posts
Good idea...I can do some of my mags without any tools, but some of them are just plain stubborn...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,684 Posts
The only tool I use on the Glock mags when changing floor plates or rebuilding them is the Glock tool and my hands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,210 Posts
I could NEVER get mine off. I always had to use a pliers. Glad to see, I am not alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
The only tool I use on the Glock mags when changing floor plates or rebuilding them is the Glock tool and my hands.
Ditto. The only one I can't get apart is the 10-round Cali type magazine, and I don't picture that as anything but a practice/plinking magazine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,244 Posts
I've sheared off tabs until I learned to compress the sides. There is a slick new tool out now called "GTUL" that makes it a snap.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,684 Posts
I've sheared off tabs until I learned to compress the sides. There is a slick new tool out now called "GTUL" that makes it a snap.
Inventions are nice, and they are basically created out of a necessity. However........I hate to think of making other people rich. One of those slick little plastic slide clamps for wood working at Lowes might be less expensive and function the same way. You're still making the inventor money when you don't have to. In this case, I would go with the pliers if I absolutely had to. Thing is, there may come a point in time this takes a toll on the metal sides of the FML (full metal lined) factory magazine. You'll only know when the new bases won't make positive contact, or when your 17 round G17 magazine will only take 15 rounds. It is what it is I reckon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
RamRod, I'm with you on the money issue. I much prefer multi-tasking tools and to use something I already have if possible. And as far as using the pliers on the mags, I only applied enough pressure to get the tabs in enough to let the plate slide, just as if I was squeezing them with my fingers like you're supposed to just without all the pain. So my reasoning is that I am not stressing the metal sleeve any more than I would if I just used my fingers.

Plus, I imagine these shorter mags (G27 so 9 count at .40) aren't as flexible as the longer ones for the full size and compacts.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,684 Posts
RamRod, I'm with you on the money issue. I much prefer multi-tasking tools and to use something I already have if possible. And as far as using the pliers on the mags, I only applied enough pressure to get the tabs in enough to let the plate slide, just as if I was squeezing them with my fingers like you're supposed to just without all the pain. So my reasoning is that I am not stressing the metal sleeve any more than I would if I just used my fingers.

Plus, I imagine these shorter mags (G27 so 9 count at .40) aren't as flexible as the longer ones for the full size and compacts.
Yes....they do seem to be more stout for the shorter mags, and reasonably so. Everything Glock is tough, just that most things will have a limit. I'm currently working on one of my match magazines that fell apart on me the last match with a +2 extension in a NDF (non drop free). The bottom of the mag body and the base would not positively engage. Right now, I've put the standard base back on, and it seems to work just fine...no problem with the spring. I'm just trying to keep anyone from avoiding any problems on down the road. I'm sure you've done fine, but as we all know....not everyone reads instructions to the 't', and maybe hear what they want to hear at the moment. Some may not even be adept with hand tools. I may be over-thinking the whole thing anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Aye, sir, no worries and you aren't over-thinking it. The money I make correcting customer's self-repair jobs is staggering. Every time I think I see something that can't be topped, it is in fact blown out of the water by the next "genius".
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,684 Posts
Ah yes...the self repair jobs. I'd rather charge flat rate and they bring 'em to me first before the really bad things happen. I get the operator fix it first a lot at work, and more than half of my time can be allotted to getting down to the original problem. I know where you're coming from.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top