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Discussion Starter #1
I posted another thread regarding recent failure to feed issues with my Glock 36. This morning, I put on my reading glasses and gave the Glock a closer inspection. I found issue with the standard connector shown here



As you can see, the connector machining appears rough, there is an obvious excess of material on one side of the part, and the other side (not shown) has a serious indention.

While this may or may not be related to the feed issue, I am sucking it up and ordering a new part tomorrow to replace this one. Clearly, this should not have made it out of the factory. Also, I should have noticed this long before now as I have had this Glock for many months.
 

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I posted another thread regarding recent failure to feed issues with my Glock 36. This morning, I put on my reading glasses and gave the Glock a closer inspection. I found issue with the standard connector shown here



As you can see, the connector machining appears rough, there is an obvious excess of material on one side of the part, and the other side (not shown) has a serious indention.

While this may or may not be related to the feed issue, I am sucking it up and ordering a new part tomorrow to replace this one. Clearly, this should not have made it out of the factory. Also, I should have noticed this long before now as I have had this Glock for many months.
ctr,

First, you should know, the part in your picture is NOT the connector. It is the vertical extension of the trigger bar which disengages the firing pin safety. The visible portion of the connector is the hook at the rear of the frame. The connector really should not have anything to do with your extraction problem.

Second, that bump is the normal design on the GLOCK .45acp trigger bars. The rough finish on the back side of the vertical extension is simply cosmetic. That area does not interact with any other mechanism.

Third, the primary (though certainly not only) causes of a failure to extract are as follows:

- Worn, broken extractor
- Defective ammunition
- Dirt under extractor claw
- Dirty chamber
- Shooting with an unlocked wrist (limp-wristing)

I am a GLOCK certified armor, if I lived anywhere nearby, I would offer to look at it for you. Perhaps there is an armorer near you that will volunteer to help. Or, if you are a member of GSSF, you can have it inspected for free by an armorer at any GSSF shoot.

Good luck.
 

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As stated above......your picture looks normal for everything on a Glock pistol. To add to RoadRunner71's diagnosis hit list....add your magazines to the list of possible causes on FTFs.
Whatever the case may be, we need to clear up some of the misinformation of the picture and the terms used to describe it so others are not lead to believe it's fact.
 

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plus one on the two posts above my post.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, of course you are right. Don't know what I was thinking. I had noticed the part was different than on my other Glock.

Ramrod, the magizines should be good, both came with the Glock which I got about 6 months ago.

RoadRunner, I would tend to rule out limp wristing as I have shot a lot of 45 rounds in my time. This Glock 45 is fairly new to me, but these are not stove pipes. I believe the extractor is in good working order as well, and is clean. I would tend to support a combination of ammo and dirty chamber as the culprits. I was using WWB, but this particular session, the gun was heavily fouled after 150 rounds.
 

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Thanks guys, of course you are right. Don't know what I was thinking. I had noticed the part was different than on my other Glock.

Ramrod, the magizines should be good, both came with the Glock which I got about 6 months ago.

RoadRunner, I would tend to rule out limp wristing as I have shot a lot of 45 rounds in my time. This Glock 45 is fairly new to me, but these are not stove pipes. I believe the extractor is in good working order as well, and is clean. I would tend to support a combination of ammo and dirty chamber as the culprits. I was using WWB, but this particular session, the gun was heavily fouled after 150 rounds.
Well, at this point,without having it in my hands, I'm just not sure what to tell you. Personally, I would change to a different ammo - I've used a lot of Blazer Brass, American Eagle, MagTech, and Lawman. Run a Bore Snake through it every 50-100 rnds. See if it clears up with a different ammo. If it doesn't, you need to have some one look at it. If you can't find an armorer or gunsmith to look at it locally, call GLOCK customer service.

Here is a question that I should have asked before. Did you buy it new or used? Is it a GLOCK barrel or after-market? If it is after-market, the chamber may not be quite to spec. I'm just spit-balling at this point. I wish I could help you more.

Good luck!
 

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You may have stumbled across one of the earlier model G36 pistols. Check with Glock on the serial number....there may need to be upgrades or changes.....that includes magazine followers. If it's of current production, then I would definitely call Glock. 1-770-432-1202
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I purchased it new. Everything is stock except for the trigger spring, which I upgraded to a NY1. The date of manufacture, and the model number on some of the parts lead me to believe it is current, and not an older model that set on the shelf for a while. I'll try some different ammo when I have the funds to purchase.
 
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