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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fellow Glock owners are familiar with the slide stop and how big a pain it can be for people with arthritis or chubby fingers. I'm wondering if anyone has found a way to work that dang thing without plunking down extra cash on an aftermarket replacement part.
 

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I just slide the slide back the very fraction of an inch it takes to make that click and line up the takedown lever, with my strong hand. Then work the takedown with the weak hand...slides right off. I have bad manual dexterity in my hands and have no problem whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I never had a problem with my G17, but that was 10 years ago.
The G26 I bought this spring is a little smaller. My fingers are a bit fatter, and the arthritis has only gotten worse.
I was hoping for a suggestion of a make-shift tool that could hold both sides down without causing damage to the polymer frame.
 

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You could try regular pliers, with a pair of the rubber slip on pads. I think I saw them at Home Depot.
 

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I would look into a set of locking c-clamp pliers and a jar of Plasti-dip (That's the brand name, used to make your own rubber tool handles). You could set the pliers to the need grip depth and if you dip the ends in the plasti-dip it is soft enough to grab the slide lock and protect the rest of the pistol. You should be able to find the stuff at your local hardware store. Good Luck Moondo
 

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Must be talking about the take down lever? Are you trying to push it down from the top, or pull it down from the bottom? I find it easier to pull down from the bottom.
 

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I do not have a problem with the regular glock slide release, but for awhile I had the LaserMax installed and that replaced a slide release with one that was about 5x harder to push down.

1) Pull the slide back "enough" with your left hand only (gun facing away from you)

2) Push down the right side slide release with your right thumb nail (strong nail)

3) Release gun slide (left hand) while keeping your right hand thumb nail pressing down on the slide release.

4) The slide stop will now stay down on the right side and you can let go with both hands (do not drop the gun yet)

5) Rotate and grab the gun with left hand underneath the slide. Put the left thumb over slide release pressing down slightly (the side from step 4 that is already down). The barrel will probably be pointing right about where your heart is so if it is loaded you will be an instant nominee for the Darwin award.

6) With your right thumb nail press the other side of the slide release (nothing is touching the slide itself).

At this point the slide will pop off all by itself and give you a satisfying thud in the chest. Depending on whether you are sitting or standing the slide will now drop down and smash your nuts or your feet. You may now drop the gun.





As for me I just put the stock glock parts back in.
 

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I have the same problem as Lewis128 but not because my fingers are too big but because of arthritis in my hands. I know that everybody feels it's not that hard to pull the lever down but your hands work for you.

I got rid of my G-19c because it was difficult no matter if I tried pulling down pushing down etc. hell I tried everything I could think of. Just didn't work.

So now I have 8 M&Ps 9mm to .45 from shooting them to field stripping I have zero problems.
 

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I have a G-27 and if I clean another gun first and get my fingers oily, forget it! I can't pull down the levers to release the slide. So I will tear down and clean the Glock first. The easiest gun to take down is my Beretta 92. It's a piece of cake compared to the 1911 or my Ruger Mark II.
 

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Fellow Glock owners are familiar with the slide stop and how big a pain it can be for people with arthritis or chubby fingers. I'm wondering if anyone has found a way to work that dang thing without plunking down extra cash on an aftermarket replacement part.
Don't think extra cash is going to solve your problem.

It may be in the grip you use to move the slide rearward.

Try this:

Ensure the gun is clear and empty of all magazines & ammo. Remove all ammo to another room.

Take a seat and relax for a moment. Now, let's check that chamber for ammo, holding the frame in the right hand (just like you're getting ready to fire) with your finger OFF the trigger. OK Now turn the gun toward your left and in front of you.

Grasp the slide in the palm of the left hand left thumb pointing toward the right elbow (at the rear of the slide),
now using both hands to push in opposite directions, push. If you'll hold the gun kind of close to the body/chest area this should be an easy motion. Remember don't grasp with the finger tips, lay your fingers and thumb down along the sides of the slide. Try racking the slide several times and get comfortable with this move.

Now perform the above rack, but this time use the right thumb to raise the slide stop lever and ease the slide onto the lever. Inspect the chamber and ensure it is clear. Holding the gun as before, rack the slide and allow the gun to go into battery. Point it in a safe direction and pull the trigger.

Try this next step if your hands are really sore.

Get and old placemat or thin towel to use for this next step and lay it out on a table. While holding the gun in the righthand, lay it down on the towel,muzzle pointing away from you. The grip will point to your right also.

I prefer to sit during this next operation but standing might be more comfortable.

Picking the firearm up with the righthand, point the muzzle down and onto the towel. Now, push the muzzle down on to the table while only using the right hand. You should feel the frame/receiver move downward just a little. Reach over the slide with the left hand thumb & forefinger and release the slide lock by pushing it toward the trigger. While holding the slide lock toward the trigger, release the downward pressure on the frame & lift up on the frame. The slide should fall right off!

Yes, there is a safety concern while racking the slide with the palm of the hand over the chamber and ejection port. Most folks with challenges will perform this slowly so I don't see a great need to worry about a primer finding it's way onto the ejector. IF THERE IS a round in the chamber, it will most likely will fall down the magazine well at this time.

Hope this helps.
 

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There is a video on YouTube that helped me, sorry I don't have the link. I have my right hand over the top and my left hand underneath. I think H8SPVMT has it right.
Grasping the slide with the fingers over the back of the slide and the thumb pushing down on the frame is another very good technique. Difficult for some folks to perform if they have a weak grip though.

That is the technique I use because it allows good control of the slide.
 

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Shoot, I have trouble with the take down levers on my Glocks sometimes just because they are small, not fat finger or arthritis problems. I use the left hand to pull the slide back (think "the matrix" reload, where the dude in the robe checks his chambers) and pull the levers down from underneath with my right hand (strong hand). I still have problems just because the things are so tiny.
 

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Try this way:




  • Lean some of your weight down on the pistol so that the slide is pushed back a bit.
  • Use your fingernails on your other hand to pull the levers, which should no longer have tension from the slide.
  • Lift up the pistol and the weight of the slide will pull it down far enough so that you can release the levers.
  • You can now easily remove the slide.

I don't think it can get any easier on your hands than this without a very imaginative tool.
 

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Fellow Glock owners are familiar with the slide stop and how big a pain it can be for people with arthritis or chubby fingers. I'm wondering if anyone has found a way to work that dang thing without plunking down extra cash on an aftermarket replacement part.

Some models can be tougher than others. With use, it breaks-in like the rest of the parts.

Check topglock.com it appears that they have an extended slide stop available. At $11.45 that's a cheap fix to the problem...have a Glock armor install it.

TopGlock.com: Glock Extended Controls
 

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Try this way:




  • Lean some of your weight down on the pistol so that the slide is pushed back a bit.
  • Use your fingernails on your other hand to pull the levers, which should no longer have tension from the slide.
  • Lift up the pistol and the weight of the slide will pull it down far enough so that you can release the levers.
  • You can now easily remove the slide.

I don't think it can get any easier on your hands than this without a very imaginative tool.
Thanks, a picture IS worth a thousand words, that's what I was explaining earlier.
 
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