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Discussion Starter #1
I've been carrying for a little over 5 years now and lately I've been thinking about "what if I actually did have to pull the trigger in self defense?" I need an attorney on speed dial. But how do I go about this? Do I just do my research for a pro-gun/pro-2ndA attorney and pop the number into my phone in the event I need him/her? Do I need to set up a consultation, which I assume isn't free and could get expensive if I can't find that special one. I've been fortunate enough not to have needed an attorney for anything before so I'm not sure how all that works. Any advice to help push me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated!
 

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The personal route I have taken is this:

Do you have a relationship with a lawyer who does typical lawyer things for you? Maybe you could ask them for a recommendation?

I have a friend who is an attorney, and has done regular attorney work for me in the past (estate planning and whatnot). He is also an avid shooter, and he and I go to the range once in a while. The basic deal we have is that if I (God forbid) need a lawyer for a self defense case, I call him.

He will come, tell me to shut up, and then act as my counsel until he can get a lawyer who specializes in (self) defense cases to show up.

Maybe it isn't the perfect plan, but it gives me peace of mind.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

Search "Kentucky Gun Lawyer", call a few and ask lots of questions. They should offer at least an initial free consultation.
 
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The personal route I have taken is this:

Do you have a relationship with a lawyer who does typical lawyer things for you? Maybe you could ask them for a recommendation?

I have a friend who is an attorney, and has done regular attorney work for me in the past (estate planning and whatnot). He is also an avid shooter, and he and I go to the range once in a while. The basic deal we have is that if I (God forbid) need a lawyer for a self defense case, I call him.

He will come, tell me to shut up, and then act as my counsel until he can get a lawyer who specializes in (self) defense cases to show up.

Maybe it isn't the perfect plan, but it gives me peace of mind.
It's a good plan.
 

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I shoot with a couple of attorneys that belong to the gun club. One is a public defender and the other is a family law attorney. I asked them if they were involved in a self-defense shooting, who would they call.
 

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Better call Saul.
 

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If you don't know an attorney the can ferret out a recommendation for you, then there's a few things you can do. It will take some legwork.

First, search for criminal defense attorneys and read up on their bios. If they are doing mostly DUI and drug cases, they are probably not the right choice. Former prosecutors are often a good starting point. Do so reading about them. You'll find some lawyers come up in new stories and articles more often than others. You'll get a lot of hits.

Search for your state's bar associations. Lawyers are cliquey, and those with similar practices hang out in various associations. There's probably one for criminal law attorneys in your state. Poke around there and see what you find.

You may find some of these attorneys are also adjunct professors and teach Continuing Legal Education classes. That's a good sign because it means the law is more than just a paycheck to them; they seem to take additional interest in their field.

You'll end up with some names.

Go to your state bar website. Every state has one. Dig around, you'll find a page regarding discipline proceedings and lawyer status. Enter the lawyer's name and you'll see if he or she is in good standing. Here's Georgia's, for example: https://www.gabar.org/membership/membersearch.cfm

Chances are your candidates are in good standing, but check if they have a history.

Then call them. You'll likely need to pay to meet with them. Don't be pissed if they require a payment to meet with you. They have to make a living and they can't spend all day answering questions from every Tom, Dick and Harry. Their time is money, just like yours is.

Ask them questions -
Have you handled self defense cases or murder cases?
If so, which ones and how did they end?
How many trials have you done?
What are your fees (to some degree, you get what you pay for)?
What type of payment plans do you have if I have to go to trial?
Can I have references of former clients you've helped?

From there, you can make a decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey, thanks for the replies, advice and humor! You all have given me some good starting points for my lawyer shopping. I really do appreciate the help :yup:
 

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I find lawyers the same way I find Dr's , find someone in a related field and ask. I ask my Pharmacist about Dr's that I dont know, or ask the Drug sales people. they work in closely related fields and know who is sharp, who keeps up their education, etc...

When I was looking for a lawyer, I asked the local Bond Agents, and County Clerks Who they would call and who they would avoid. Surprisingly the two lists were pretty consistent!

I do not keep a Lawyer on retainer. I do have his name and number in my wallet. If I had a problem at night I can keep my own mouth shut till 7 am and call him then. [ If you pay them a lot of money they will come out anytime of the day or night, but if you are willing to wait till regular hours they will still be happy to help you without the retainer fee].

Knock on wood , I have been carrying for over 35 years with out any need of legal help. Hopefully I'll never need it! DR
 

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I took an SD law class taught by Arsenal Attorneys at the NRA HQ. The class was co-taught by a former prosecutor and a criminal defense attorney. This topic was talked about at length. BTW, they were not trying to sell anything in this seminar. They mostly deal with gun trusts, not defense, but the two that taught had the right backgrounds. What they said was:

A clear-cut, perfectly "good shoot" in the eyes of the law is rare. It might be clear in your mind, but the legal system will not have been there when it happened. A prosecutor can taint the facts of almost any shooting if he is so inclined. If he is some activist liberal, or the person you shot was someone "whose life matters," he may be so inclined.

Immediately post-shooting, you want a local, experienced criminal defense attorney, one who knows the local cops, prosecutors and courts. I hate to say this, but you want the kind of attorney the bad guys with money call. Yes, I know you are not a criminal in this situation. But your goal right after the shooting is: 1) To not say anything that might later be used against you, and 2) Say enough, based on your attorney's advice, so you get to go home in the next few hours. That kind of attorney is an expert at those two goals.

Chris Rock did a routine on Johnnie Cochran. "People say if you hire Johnnie, you look guilty. That's true. You might look guilty, but you're goin' home! Instead of lookin' innocent in a jail cell, I'd rather be lookin' guilty at the mall!"

You also want an attorney who has on call service. If you call him at 2AM, either he, or an associate, will show up immediately. It's good to even get them at the shooting scene while you are still there and the cops are processing the scene. A good criminal defense attorney can notice things about how the site is being processed that may help. More importantly, they can get your story ASAP and give you instructions as to how to handle yourself. Even if you already know the rules, you will be really shook up. The coaching will help.

Later, if you go to trial, you may need an expert SD attorney. You may also need a specialist to get your gun back, but it might cost you more in legal fees that it would cost to buy a new one. But the first attorney's job is to make sure it never goes that far.
 

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I know quite a few lawyers, some are even friends.....

You have to real careful and get the right one. Most criminal defense attorney's are used to dealing with the dregs of society, you do not want to be handled that way.
 

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I've kept my "general practice" attorney on retainer (and on Speed Dial) for decades. If, in the event, I need a gun-law specialist? It's my retained attorney's job to both recommend & contact THAT 2nd attorney with an immediate S.O.S. 'Cuz the very LAST thing I EVER wish to do, when I NEED an attorney, is to waste time & effort trying to...find one. :yup:
 

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It's a good plan.

Agreed. Any lawyer can tell you to shut up and deflect the cops while they find a specialist for you. Also, a lawyer that you are friends with, or at least do other business with, is going to know you and likely be cheaper than the best specialist to have on retainer.
 

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Agreed. Any lawyer can tell you to shut up and deflect the cops while they find a specialist for you. Also, a lawyer that you are friends with, or at least do other business with, is going to know you and likely be cheaper than the best specialist to have on retainer.
Without a doubt. But one of the best things about having a lawyer friend being your first line of contact I figure is - they can listen to you as you tell your sob story. I mean I figure if you have to use a lawyer, all hell has broken loose and unless you are really disciplined, you're going to unload on your lawyer... which is not always a good idea. Your "friend lawyer" can tell you what to tell, and what not to tell the lawyer you are going to use to represent you.

Even the strongest of grown men can break under the pressure of a shooting.
 

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Can't help, I was lucky enough to get a defense attorney in the family. He'd probably make an appearance for me in exchange for a box of ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, after following some of the advice from this thread I found a few attorneys in my area that seemed to fit the bill. Then, to my complete surprise, I found out that a friend of the family is a criminal defense attorney. He has a good record including some capital murder trial cases that all had "favorable outcomes". What a small world. I'm still going to contact the other guys I found as back ups just in case. Thank you all very much for the info and advice! :hand10:
 

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I love the advice that says get a lawyer who "specializes" in "self defense" cases. You might be looking a long time. Lawyers rarely, if ever, "specialize" in self defense cases. Self defense is simply an affirmative defense at trial if a trial is necessary. Any good criminal defense lawyer with any experience defending violent crime cases knows how this works. Now...finding a good criminal defense lawyer may take some work and/or money. And BTW, most lawyers will not charge for an initial consultation presuming you are not yet charged or in the local lockup.
 

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I've got a couple of pro gun attorney's in my speed dial on my smarter than me phone. They may not be the attorney I need but thru references I trust them to start the proceedings and refer me to the proper attorney. I'm seriously considering CCWSAFE as an alternative to this plus the monetary advantage.
 
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