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Go to a gun shop , handle a shield , m&p9c and the 2.0 version and a Taurus g2c . Today I would have no issues for a new CC'er and you can learn what might work better for you with time . . I have a daughter this 5-9 145 lb and she carrys ether a cw9 kahr or glock 19 depending on cloths he husband is 5-11 165 and carrys ether a tp40 kahr or sig p250sc . Both and my self and wife carry at 3:00 in some version of a iwb hybrid . My wifes a little 5-2 and her EDC is a Kimber ultra 9mm but carried a m&p9c for some years . I'm heavier at 5-10 215 so what I carry does not really matter .

I does matter how you dress as to what you can conceal well . If your a shirt tucked in sort of guy smaller is better , maybe p365 or that new xd or shield or thinner kahr cw or cm model or even a smaller micro 380 will have a place at times . No brand or model is all that for everyone and there are very few bad handguns to day to pick from . Heck it might be a snub nose revolver will serve you well but that's for you to try and choice . MIght be this will work well , handgun with laser , a tac light and folding knife for a good price in a lite weight package . Carry federal HST 38sp ammo
https://www.smith-wesson.com/firearms/mp-bodyguard-38-revolver-everyday-carry-kit
 

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Just remember as you start this journey, if you are like the rest of us you will purchase may pistols in the future.
So as you evolve your first gun may not be the one you end up carrying the most.
Don't sweat the first gun too much. Choose the one you think you will like, then time will tell.
Advice, do not cheap out on gun belt and holster. They are just as important as the gun.
A bad belt and holster will not make the best gun great to carry
 

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Oh, yes, magazines. Have fun finding one for the 9mm Shield. Its neither a single stack nor a double stack. I found a single stack .45 mag holster is usable.
 

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Don't sweat the first gun too much. Choose the one you think you will like, then time will tell.
Agreed. It's the first, but I'd bet it won't be the last.

Let me add my thoughts as a sort on new carry guy. I did carry a revolver many years ago but then went 40+ years without carrying. Recently I decided to start carrying again and it's like I'm new as I'd never even shot a semi-auto handgun. I didn't know much about modern handguns so I started by doing some basic research. Gotta love that internet! I also talked to some people who I know that are more knowledgeable on the subject than I am.

When trying to decide what gun to buy a few considerations for me were that it be something I felt was reliable and not overly expensive, as well as something a small guy like me could conceal. I'd heard a lot of good things about Glocks and they certainly have a following but I thought they were a little expensive compared to the Smith and Wessons that also have a good reputation and a strong following. I didn't want a cheap non-name brand gun, but I also didn't want to pay a premium price for a name. Early on I decided I'd buy something from the S&W M&P line.

I originally was looking at the M&P 9mm compact, because I thought the word compact meant small which fit my ease of concealment requirement. It was surprising to me to find out that the Shield was actually smaller and lighter than the compact. Another plus to me was that I felt the single stack Shield would fit my hands better than the double stack compact and the 9 rounds vs 13 didn't seem like a big deal. I don't have any place close by where I could shoot both for a better comparison but when I saw I could buy the Shield for right around $250 I figured why not? It's priced even better now as the $50 rebate came out shortly after I bought mine. I didn't really expect it to be the last gun I buy, but instead it was a starting point.

I bought a Mr Softy AIWB holster on the advice of someone on one of the gun forums, don't remember if it was here or not, but it was inexpensive and so far I really like it. Again I know it won't be the last holster I buy, but a good starter for me.

The main reason I went with 9mm instead of a larger caliber was that the ammo is relatively cheap and I want to shoot a lot. I was lucky to find a local sportsman's club to join that has multiple outdoor ranges available to me anytime I want, and so far they have never been crowded when I go there. Many times I'm actually there by myself as members are given the gate code.

Something else I did, and I'm not saying it's the best way, but just how I thought about it, was to also buy an M&P .22 compact. My thoughts there were that with .22 ammo at about 3 cents a round I can shoot tons of it, giving me lots of practice with a gun that has a lot of similarities to my carry gun. Each time I go to the range I shoot a couple hundred rounds of .22, then finish with a box of so of 9mm. I'm having fun, learning more about the guns each time and not spending a fortune.

Just throwing my experience so far out there.

Oh, yes, magazines. Have fun finding one for the 9mm Shield. Its neither a single stack nor a double stack. I found a single stack .45 mag holster is usable.
I'm a little bit confused at what you mean here. Are you saying it's hard to find magazines for the 9mm Shield? I bought extras at the gun mag warehouse for $20 each.

Or did you mean that it's hard to find a holster for the 9mm Shield? I'm using a Mr Softy and like it's fit, but it's leather which is probably more forgiving than a plastic holster.
 

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Yup, I messed up. Talking about the holster. Royal PITA finding a good mag holster. I have one leather dual mag holster I found at a gun show. I have a kydex one I made myself. I have a Bianchi I found in a gun shop. Neither one I bought was for a Shield, but some generic single-stack .45.
 

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Just my $0.02, I think you’re putting too much emphasis on magazine capacity. You should carry a spare loaded magazine, and as others point out the two most important characteristics are how comfortable the handgun is to carry and how well you shoot it. Think less how many rounds you send downrange. What matters is how many hits you make.

I comfortably carry a Glock27 AIWB and a mag on weak side. Sometimes I carry a Glock 19 on strong side out of waistband (OWB). I like equally shooting either of them. But the 9mm is somewhat less expensive to shoot than the .40. Currently 9mm is $8/50 rounds and .40 is $14/50 rounds at my local store (brass casing, full metal jacket target ammo).
 

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Very small pistols are experts' tools. They are not for beginners.
I agree with this and I must admit that I'm understanding it a little more every day. Could you and others maybe expound on this a little bit more?

I will add that most people can conceal more gun than they realize. Add an extended magazine to many of these new small wonder 9's and you are at the length of a compact gun (G19 etc).

The weight difference between a fully loaded 8+1 shield and a fully loaded M&P compact with 15+1 is about the weight of your iPhone X with a case. It's not that much difference, and the concealable length is virtually identical.

Don't forget that you will need to accessorize your new gun - gun belt, holster, extra mags, small addition to your house for holster storage...to name a few.
 

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Echoing the other posts about shooting what you consider carrying. In the long run, it won't make much difference as many of us have found what we started with isn't what we currently carry. Just in the last few years I've gone from a Dan Wesson ECO .45, to a Kahr CM9, to a Sig P938, and now a Sig P365. Once the SA Hellcat proves itself as reliable and prices come down to realistic street prices, I wouldn't be surprised if I jumped ship once again and mount an RDS to it. The only thing that would hold me back is the additional investment in a quality holster.

In my view, concealed carry is a journey, not a destination.
 
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Yeah, I'm fully aware of that it's just hard because I've seen some of the small weapons wit the bigger clips and some people saying they malfunction so I'd rather carry something heavier that is more reliable.
First lesson - it's a magazine, not a clip. :tongue:
Almost everyone in law enforcement that I've asked has said the Glock 19. Some of them said Glock 26 because you can't make a bigger gun smaller and since they take the same mags it didn't really matter to me other then people saying Glock 19. Which I think a 19 would be easier to shoot and since I can add an attachment on it too easier.
I wouldn't put lots of weight into choosing a carry gun based on LEO choices simply because many of them carry Glocks on duty and prefer to carry a similar manual of arms when off duty. This isn't to say they aren't knowledgeable and to disregard their opinions. I'm simply saying don't assume that their opinion on the matter is the end all be all. You did the right thing by asking this group. Lots of knowledge and varying experience here.


I really want to like the P365 XL but there's a good amount of reviews that says the gun needs a little bit of work. I understand that carrying a single stack makes the gun slimmer and probably an overall smaller gun which means less weight but I'd rather carry more ammo and have a bigger gun but that may just be me. Looking at the P365 NITRON MICRO-COMPACT is pretty enticing though.

The more and more I think about it my mind is going to the P365. Any thoughts on it?
The 365XL is not a single stack, but one would think it is based on how small it is. It holds 12 rounds with flush fit mags while the regular 365 holds 10 with flush fit or pinky extension mags, and accepts 12 round mags that give it the same grip length as the XL. The size differences between the 365 and 365 XL include the grip length, and barrel/slide length. I have a 365 as a backup/pocket gun, and I have been very pleased with it. It's a soft shooting gun given its size. I imagine the XL would be even softer.

As others have said, keep an open mind, shoot as many as you can, and fondle even more. Your carry weapon choices will most likely evolve like everyone else's. Enjoy your journey, and keep us posted on the progress.
 

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Explanation for ParsonBrown:

First of all, take as a "given" that quick and accurate, save-your-life pistol shooting is very hard to learn, and, even when practiced assiduously, remains difficult to accomplish. And that's when using a full-size, full-weight, full-hand-length-grip pistol.

Now, shrink that pistol down until it fits comfortably into an equally small holster that fits, for instance, into your pocket.
That leaves you with a pistol that's lightweight and short, so that it recoils sharply, and maybe even twists in your hand as its bullet twists in its rifling.
That light, short pistol has a grip which can be grasped with only two fingers.
It also has a pocket-safe trigger action which requires a five- to seven-pound press.
Further, its sights are too close together for easy accuracy.

The "shortie," and the pocket-size pistol, is impossible to control, unless one already is a really good, experienced pistol shooter.
But self-defense shooting depends upon quick and decisive accuracy.
Only a really good, experienced pistol shooter can wring quick and decisive accuracy out of a small-size pistol.
QED.

Does that help?
If not, ask some more questions.
 

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Start with the Glock 19. You will be adding more pistols soon enough. Not the prettiest gun, but the one you want with you when the SHTF.
 

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My very first gun was a sub nose j frame 5 shot. NO ONE told me I couldn't learn to shoot quickly and accurately with such a little gun........and therefore I learned to shoot quickly and accurately with it!

My first semi auto that I chose for myself was a Glock 19. For about the first 3 months I learned everything there was to know about clearing jams of all kinds - THEN I learned how to properly grip a Glock! Now as I teach new people I do explain to them that a revolver grip is different from a semi-auto grip - for most folks.

I've carried guns from the S&W 686 heavy L frame all steel revolver to my current carry of the SIG P238. No one ever told me that any of them were too big (or too little) for my medium size female body and medium size hands, so I carried them and shot them well.
 
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My very first gun was a sub nose j frame 5 shot. NO ONE told me I couldn't learn to shoot quickly and accurately with such a little gun........and therefore I learned to shoot quickly and accurately with it!...
I'm not certain that a J-frame Smith presents the same challenges as the AMT .45 Backup that I carried for more than 20 years.

I suspect that your learning curve was a longer one than necessary (not that you knew the difference at the time, of course).
Starting out with something easier to control and to master might've made your learning curve a good deal shorter.

For instance, my wife, Jean, learned to shoot with a full-size, full-weight M1911 in .45, and became extremely good at it. So she had the choice of any gun we owned, or could even buy something new.
One of our pistols was a J-frame Smith, and she gave it a really long, fair trial...and rejected it. Its twisty recoil was not for her small, thin hands. So she kept going, trying one gun after another.
Making this story short, her final choice was one of the tiniest pistols commercially available: a Kel-Tec P-3AT. And she is very competent with it. Very.

But by the time she chose it, she was indeed already quite an expert at self-defense shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Hey guys, it's a been a busy week but I wanted to thank everyone who commented and gave feedback! From talking to a lot of people and some of the people on here I'm pretty sure I'm going to go with the Glock 19. I'm actually going to a range tomorrow and shooting! Now they have the gen 4 and gen 5 is there one in particular I should be shooting I tend to lead towards the gen 5 because of the new barrel but would love to hear peoples thoughts! I'm pretty sure I want to stick with a 9MM gun but here are some of the guns that they have and was wondering if they are worth shooting?

Smith & Wesson M&P22 (.22 long rifle)
Ruger 1911 (45acp)
Glock 20 (10mm)
Springfield XD (.40 S&W)
Glock 23 Gen3 (40 S&W)
Canik TP9SF (9mm)
Glock 19X (9mm)
Glock 19 Gen4 (9mm)
Glock 19 Gen5 (9mm)
Glock 17 Gen3 (9mm)
Glock 43 Gen4 (9mm)
Sig Sauer P938 (9mm)
Sig Sauer 320 (9mm)
Smith & Wesson M&P Shield (9mm)
Smith & Wesson M&P9 2.0 (9mm)
Beretta APX (9mm)
Beretta 92FS (9mm)
Sig Sauer P238 (.380)
Ruger SP101 (357mag / .38 Special)
Taurus Tracker (357mag / .38 Special)

So it seems that not only would I be paying for a gun, but a good belt and a good gun holster and ammo to shoot. Is there anything I'm missing? Any other information I need to know? I know training is a good thing and I'll definitely get it but I'm going into law enforcement so whenever I go to the trooper school I'll obviously learned so this is to hold me up till then.
 

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Do not buy your first EDC unless you have made a proper analysis and tried the guns as range rentals, and, if that is not possible, at least spent some time with the options at the gun store. An EDC gun is something your life could depend upon. Most popular guns are dependable. Some guns are not. Here are some things to consider. I will comment on each item based upon my experience, and I do not mean to imply that you should think like I do.

Concealment: I selected a subcompact 9MM (3.2 inch barrel) because it easier to conceal with by body size than a compact
Capacity: I selected a pistol with 6, 7, 8 round magazines. I use 7 because the gun is easier to conceal than with 8.
Action: I wanted a crisp trigger pull with reasonable trigger take up and good reset, so striker fired was my choice.
Ergonomics: I have always been more accurate with a gun that felt like part of my hand so I chose a grip angle, texture, and size that felt great.
Use: I have no intention of being a warrior. I did that. I carry to defend myself not to engage in a running gun battle.

Options: I got down to 9mm Shield and Walther PPS M2. Similar size while Shield holds one more round, Walther felt better. Both were good at the range but the Walther felt better and I had slightly better accuracy with it. Probably was an ergonomics factor.

Reviews: I ignore magazine reviews at the magazines are selling ads to the companies that make the guns. I watched reviews on You Tube, and I quickly turned off those by people who were less than competent. There are You Tubers who do good gun reviews some do comparative reviews. I looked for the comparative reviews last. Found that most of those took the PPS M2 over the comparable Glock and Shield. Walther won more often.

Price: I am retired on a fixed income. I will not by a SIG at a price that is nearly double the price of a Walther because I am not going to war. I want to pay for a gun that will reliable go bang when I pull the trigger, has proven accuracy and reliability, and I can easily afford.
 
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Do you live in a hot or cold climate? If your usual dress is a tshirt and shorts, a smaller gun like a Shield might work best. Although it’s possible to conceal large guns with this type of dress, many people new to concealed carry are self conscious about printing. Also, it’s more comfortable to start with a lighter gun. At any rate, this has been true for me. Once I got used to carrying in general, I became more comfortable with carrying larger and heavier guns.
 

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Do not buy your first EDC unless you have made a proper analysis and tried the guns as range rentals, and, if that is not possible, at least spent some time with the options at the gun store. An EDC gun is something your life could depend upon. Most popular guns are dependable. Some guns are not. Here are some things to consider.

Options: I got down to 9mm Shield and Walther PPS M2.
Excellent advice!

I went down similar path and ended at the Kahr CW9 because of my small hands and the DA-only trigger plus no safety met my "same thing every time" criteria.

I had done a lot of range time with the CW9 and the S9 is just a better version of that.
 

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Excellent advice!

I went down similar path and ended at the Kahr CW9 because of my small hands and the DA-only trigger plus no safety met my "same thing every time" criteria.

I had done a lot of range time with the CW9 and the S9 is just a better version of that.
The 9mm Kahr pistols are great guns. I considered one bit at the time I was doing hand therapy to restore lost strength in my left hand. I had trouble racking the CW9 and I wanted a short stroke trigger. But there is no question whether you made a good choice. Kahr is among the top brands in pistols. And like Walthers they have a hefty feel in the hand.
 
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Do not buy your first EDC unless you have made a proper analysis and tried the guns as range rentals, and, if that is not possible, at least spent some time with the options at the gun store...[emphasis added]
Follow the extremely good advice given in the emphasized words!

"Proper analysis" = Fire several magazines-full, take very careful and extensive notes, and then go home and analyze the data you have collected before making your choice.

But before doing any of this, get some specific, pistol-related self-defense training using any pistol you can beg or borrow. That training will help guide you in making your final decision.

And, yes, be prepared to spend at least $250.00, and maybe even $350.00, on a proper belt, a high-quality holster, and at least one reload pouch.
 
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Hey guys, it's a been a busy week but I wanted to thank everyone who commented and gave feedback! From talking to a lot of people and some of the people on here I'm pretty sure I'm going to go with the Glock 19. I'm actually going to a range tomorrow and shooting! Now they have the gen 4 and gen 5 is there one in particular I should be shooting I tend to lead towards the gen 5 because of the new barrel but would love to hear peoples thoughts! I'm pretty sure I want to stick with a 9MM gun but here are some of the guns that they have and was wondering if they are worth shooting?

So it seems that not only would I be paying for a gun, but a good belt and a good gun holster and ammo to shoot. Is there anything I'm missing? Any other information I need to know? I know training is a good thing and I'll definitely get it but I'm going into law enforcement so whenever I go to the trooper school I'll obviously learned so this is to hold me up till then.
My opinion, Glock 19 is a VERY GOOD choice. Its a very shoot-able gun that can be carried year round (with some attention to clothing choices, belt and holster(s)).

Like most on this forum, you will go on to get more guns, you might get smaller guns or larger guns, like MOST of us on this or any gun forum, but again, the Glock 19 is a VERY GOOD choice.

Between the Gen 4 and 5 - both are good choices.

Good luck to you!
 
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