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Discussion Starter #1
Today I took my P220 .45 ACP Stainless Steel Carry Elite to the range and fired 100 rounds. That now makes 500 rounds total having been shot thru this gun. The gun, up until today, has performed perfectly and is a great shooter with remarkable accuracy.

So, while shooting in at around the 60th round fired the slide locked back. Although that seemed sudden, I thought the mag was now empty. I looked down and saw that the round was canted slightly with nose down. I wanted to clear the gun. I was unable to release the mag. I then pulled back on the slide and that sent the round into the chamber. The gun began running perfectly after that. This is the one and only time I've ever had the slightest hiccup with this gun.

So could someone tell me what happened here?
 

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My guess is that you may have been inadvertently pushing up on the slide release and the slide 'caught' on it in the locked position when it cycled after the last round you had fired. If so, it was not so much a malfunction as operator error. It happens to me when shooting smaller pistols if I don't pay attention.
 

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That sounds logical to me.. It happens sometimes. Either that or you may have had a little bit of debris in the mag causing the round to hang slightly. If it happens again, then worry.
 

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Sounds as if the round was partially out of the magazine (could not release the mag) , this would more likely be a thumb or finger riding the slide or a gun/ magazine malfunction. It is possible the OP partially engaged the slide release causing the slide to no fully cycle as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for your input. I think you've correctly identified the problem. And its likely me. While I am a SIG guy, I have noticed that with the position of the slide release on the classic P series pistols with my thumbs forward grip my strong hand thumb tends to ride that slide release. I must pay more attention. Again, thanks.
 

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Glad I could help. I found a few pistols I have shot tend to have me riding the slide release and accidently engaging.
 
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Uh it's kinda like I knew it wasn't broke that's why didn't fix it. Sometimes we must except the fact that Doodoo happens. Sometimes without any obvious explanation
 

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It's defective send it to me. Probably is your thumb, like you said. One of the best pistols I have owned was a P228. I sure do miss it. Now that you are thinking it's your thumb, you should be able to correct it.
 

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I would pay attention to the possible slide release issue and shoot another couple of hundred rounds.
If you don't get a repeat malf then you'll have your answer for sure. :yup:
 

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This may require a warranty return back to SIG...for your thumb. Their Custom Shop can carve & refinish it! :biggrin2:
 
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Mark it down as a good learning experience! I find that when I'm at the range I have to find things to practice that I might need if and when I get into a jam. Today, for example, I took my new SIG P225-A1 to put a few rounds down the pipe. This is a sweet shooter, and I absolutely LOVE the short reset trigger!

However, it's a DA/SA with no safety. It's meant to be carried in Condition 2 (round chambered, hammer down). That means my regular load, rack, aim and fire until empty doesn't require the initial long DA pull. So, I practiced it today. And what a difference it makes!

Last week, the guy in the lane next to me was practicing mag changes. He'd put one round in a mag and two or three in another. He'd then fire the one round, drop the mag and switch to the next. He had his range bag on the floor so as to catch the falling mag and not damage it. He repeated this exercise for the full hour I was there.

We can't really practice malfunctions, but if and when they occur, I take them as part of my training exercise: ascertain the problem, determine the remediation needed, fix the problem, and get on with my shooting.
 
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