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First squirrels this year.

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Been busy moving the last few months to a new house on three acres. This weekend I decided to bring my spring piston air rifle to join me on my deck for my morning coffee. Got 2 Saturday and one Sunday. All three were busy working the tree tops.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Old friend has a home in an area overrun by wild quail, sets live traps around the yard and regularly enjoys the results. Tells me that the more quail he harvests the more quail show up on his property.

Are squirrels the same?
It seems as long as they have a plentiful source of food, its hard to hunt them off a property. I'm not really trying to thin them out here. I just think its fun to shoot and eat them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nice work! Lotsa questions... what's the gun, about what range to the squirrels, and what pellets did you use?
It's a Hatsan model 95 .22 cal spring piston air rifle. These three were all somewhere between 15 and 20 yards. I'm using Gamo "Red Fire" 15.4 grain pellets. They're basically a hollow point pellet with a pointed polymer tip.
 

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Nice, thanks for sharing. A lot of folks do not know how truly enjoyable Air Rifles are. Wish I had your deck to shoot mine from.Some further info for those interested. The Hatsan 95 is a Turkish Clone of the Weilrauch HW95 a notoriously fine German Air Rifle. Both have a lot power and recoil and can be loud. Might not be neighbor friendly for some. The Turks always seem to get some nice wood stocks.
That looks like a Stock scope that comes with the Hatsan. Obviously the rifle gets the job done. Congrats.
 

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I need to start killing these pests. They like to chew on my back deck and front porch. Both are wood. They have done some pretty significant damage this year. Problem is I live in a neighborhood, shooting out back wouldn't be a problem as I have 1.5 acres but out front I'd be concerned about hitting the neighbors houses.
 

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I think the old squirrels on my street have passed the word to the young squirrels on my street to avoid my property. I used to be overrun with them, but no more. They rarely venture into my yard anymore. I've got a .22 caliber air rifle that is quite accurate. I started popping them at every opportunity after they'd chewed through much of the wiring in my attic. The electricians who repaired their damage said that I was very lucky in avoiding a fire. See squirrel = Shoot squirrel.
 

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My former home in NW CT was heavily wooded with maples, ash, and some enormous old oaks. The oaks were smorgasbords for the squirrels! When the acorns were just short of ready to drop, the greedy squirrels would gnaw off the tip of a branch with a couple of leaves and a cluster of acorns on it just to get one acorn! The remainder of course succumbed to gravity, and at times it looked like my yard was "snowing" oak leaves. Suffice to say we had an abundance of squirrels.
The elderly lady next door liked to feed birds, and I think her birdseed budget was close to what I spent on heating oil each winter. Of course the birds were equally sloppy eaters, knocking half a dozen seeds to the ground for each one they ate - dessert for the squirrels. So the squirrels benefited from both yards. The neighbor husband was annoyed at the mess they made, so with his permission his back yard adjoining mine became a free-fire zone. Sniping the tree rats from a flat-roofed part of my house became an enjoyable pastime, and kept my Lab amused with fresh chew toys. The RWS 34 in .177 was adequate out to a max of 40 yards with good pellets.
 

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I need to start killing these pests. They like to chew on my back deck and front porch. Both are wood. They have done some pretty significant damage this year. Problem is I live in a neighborhood, shooting out back wouldn't be a problem as I have 1.5 acres but out front I'd be concerned about hitting the neighbors houses.
If you are just trying to get rid of them because of damage they are causing, you can use rat traps baited with peanut butter. Anchor/tie the traps to something. I was in the Navy with a guy that ran a squirrel trap line using that technique. Always had plenty of squirrels to eat.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Nice, thanks for sharing. A lot of folks do not know how truly enjoyable Air Rifles are. Wish I had your deck to shoot mine from.Some further info for those interested. The Hatsan 95 is a Turkish Clone of the Weilrauch HW95 a notoriously fine German Air Rifle. Both have a lot power and recoil and can be loud. Might not be neighbor friendly for some. The Turks always seem to get some nice wood stocks.
That looks like a Stock scope that comes with the Hatsan. Obviously the rifle gets the job done. Congrats.
Actually I did replace the stock scope. It's a "Hammers" 3x9x32 with adjustable paralax. Never heard of it before but it had pretty good reviews on Amazon, so I took a chance. It's by no means a high end scope but it's alot clearer under full magnification than the stock scope, and seems to hold zero well. Overall I'm pleased with the setup.
 
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If you are just trying to get rid of them because of damage they are causing, you can use rat traps baited with peanut butter. Anchor/tie the traps to something. I was in the Navy with a guy that ran a squirrel trap line using that technique. Always had plenty of squirrels to eat.
That's a fantastic idea however I doubt I'd get my wife to agree to it. She's barely OK with me shooting them and that's only because of the damage they are causing.
 

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Watched one of the neighborhood outdoor orange Tabby Cats chase a Squirrel right up the side of a stucco building and at about 15 feet up snatched the squirrel right off the wall. I was in awe of this ninja cat and he totally eradicated our squirrel population for about five years. They would break into the roofs of our buildings and destroy the insulation and wiring. Good riddance. Never had to fire a shot.
 

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Got this from Duck Commander. I usually make squirrel gravy over biscuits.

Squirrel dumplings

BROTH & SQUIRREL
  • 1 large squirrel, skinned and cut in half (if you can't get squirrel, use a large rabbit or large chicken)
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 1 can (12 ounces) evaporated milk
  • 1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) butter
DUMPLINGS
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling
  • 5 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 tablespoons butter-flavored vegetable shortening (I use Crisco)
  • 2 cups buttermilk
DIRECTIONS
Make the broth and squirrel: In the soup pot, bring 10 cups of water to a boil. Add the squirrel and season generously with salt and pepper. Cover and simmer until tender enough to be pierced with a fork, about 1 hour. Remove the squirrel from the broth and set aside. Add the milk and butter to the broth. Leave the broth to simmer while you make the dumplings. Make the dumplings: In a large mixing bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda. With a pastry blender or 2 knives scissor-fashion, cut in the shortening until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add the buttermilk a little at a time, stirring until a soft dough forms, about like the consistency of biscuit dough. Divide the dough into 4 balls. Sprinkle the counter with flour. Roll each ball of dough to 1/8-to-1/4-inch thick, adding more flour as needed to prevent it from sticking. Cut into large squares. Return the broth to a boil. Make sure there is enough in the pot to fill at least half the pot. If not, add more water. Drop the dumplings into the boiling broth a handful at a time. When they are all in, turn the heat to low, cover the pot, and simmer for 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Put the meat back in the pot and let it sit until hot again.
 
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