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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If going for woods carry and looking for penetration what is the advantage of hardcast over a fmj?

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Depends on caliber and design. A lead bullet of any type gives you penetration with the added advantage of some deformation.
FMJ is usually ball or round nose ammo used for reliable feeding in auto loaders, but round nose lead would be my preference for the deforming or flattening characteristics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was just cureous, no certain caliber in mind, thanks for the info.

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For woods carry I'd prefer a hardcast flat nose, if what I was carrying allowed it.
 
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I too would prefer hardcast over FMJ in the woods hunting.
 

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The only time I would prefer FMJ for hunting is on Cape Buffalo or other large, dangerous big game, or if the hunt was under The Hague Convention rules.
 
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Cast bullets in semi-wadcutter form can also be counted on to cut, rather than displace, various tissues and blood vessels. That can be an aid to incapacitating the critter that's hit.
 

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Hard cast is harder then fmj...
That is false. Lead alloy is softer than FMJ. Copper has a Brinell hardness of about 50. Hardcast lead bullets have a Brinell hardness from 10-30.
 

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This is a little like comparing apples and oranges, but without any information on which species or degree of ripeness.

FMJ ammo is typically a solid copper-alloy cone into which a slug of soft lead has been swaged to final form. The jacket metal may be relatively soft or relatively hard, depending on the composition of the alloy used. The jacket material may be thinner or thicker, depending on the maker's designs and production methods. The lead core may be simply swaged into place or it may be bonded to the jacket material (typically done with a lead-tin solder mixture.

Cast bullets may be made from any of a wide range of suitable alloys, most commonly comprised of lead, tin, and antimony (usually some traces of arsenic or other heavy metals). Hardness will vary with the alloy selected. A very soft alloy may deform or tear apart with relative ease on impact. A very hard alloy may be so brittle that it will shatter on impact.

Then there are the true "solids", bullets made entirely of copper alloy or even mild steel. Probably the strongest type of bullet and capable of deep penetration without deformation or deflection. But the metal used will be lighter than lead alloys so overall size of the bullet will have to be greater than a lead alloy bullet to achieve the same weight. This means longer bearing surfaces, greater friction in the bore, higher pressures, and frequently limited velocities to stay within safe limits.

No simple answer to the question, only more questions that require answers to arrive at a conclusion.
 

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In on my 2nd resurrected thread today, this one only 7 years old.
 
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A very soft alloy may deform or tear apart with relative ease on impact. A very hard alloy may be so brittle that it will shatter on impact.
I recall reading many moons ago that copper jacket alloys are selected to minimize deformation on firing, while still remaining fairly soft so as to minimize damage to the barrel. That optimize/compromise appears to be geared towards a relatively narrow range of hardness, or more specifically, with respect to stopping deformation, a narrow range of modulus of elasticity for the alloy.
 
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