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Discussion Starter #1
I was just reading a discussion on another site and wanting to get the opinions of people here. The discussion was on the use of a single front night site as opposed to front and rear. Most felt that just the front was all that was necessary for close personal defense purposes. Give me your thoughts on and ideas on this subject. :confused:
Mike
 

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I'm with Bud - tho I admit that ''in extremis'' I sure as heck wanna see at least a front sight.

If we have the luxury of that odd millisecond to get a full sight picture then I want ''something'' as a rear sight, even if just a groove down topstrap!!! Better still - per my 226 - two rear sight dots and the one front sight dot - makes sense IMO.

If required to point shoot then sights don't matter but I sure want them there! I have the rudimentary sights on my R9 - but arguably they won't be used all that much in a CQC situation but - I sure prefer to have 'em. Both front and rear!
 

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It's not that bad of an idea at all.

For years patrol cops have been painting the back of their front sight with White Out. It's bright white color and reflective quality are great in low light conditions.

I know a lot of people who black out their 3 dot sights in various combinations including me.
 

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A single front night site isn't a bad idea, but I prefer the three dot with the front and rear of different colors.
 

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My most recent Sig 226 came that way as a CPO from whatever federal agency spec'd it that way. I don't like it for one simple reason: the cutouts on my preferred Trijicons act to focus light during day shooting as well as focus the eyes on the inserts when shooting in less optimal conditions.

If I don't have time to focus on the sight picture, I'll be honest: I'm not focusing on *any* sights. I'm going to point shoot.

And at civilian defense ranges, it's perfectly doable with a modicum of practice and guarantee COM hits.
 

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Maybe practice breaking tunnel vision works, and I hope I'll see at least the front sight in the vision cone, but when facing a Brown or Grizzly, I'd like the biggest brightest glow in the dark front sight I can get. Maybe the reflection of it in my eyeballs will look like the headlights of a Mack truck going at him.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Many of the people that were for the use of a single front night site thought there was always enough light to illuminate an outline of the rear sites and making acquisition of the front that much easier. There was also the discussion that in stress situations people could confuse the rear site for the front. All seem like valid arguments to me. Any one with night sites game to try covering the rear dots with some electrical tape and giving us a report no how you think it would work for you?
Mike
 

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the use of a single front night site thought there was always enough light to illuminate an outline of the rear sites and making acquisition of the front that much easier.
That makes sence, and saves me money.

I alwayes used bright nail polish on hard to see sights.
 

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The Military uses front nite sights only , cause the show up great with NV. (in the holster others would see the rear sights glowing.) As for application for CC , I can see where it might help to focus on the front sight.
 

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Any one with night sites game to try covering the rear dots with some electrical tape and giving us a report no how you think it would work for you?
I've done it Mike, that's what I based my opinion on.
 

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I've also done the same as OD has. The 3 dot sight system is a much better picture, than just the front sight only.
 

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I have XS Sights Big Dots on my USPc - the front sight is a giant white dot with tritium, and the rear is a single vertical bar of tritium. So you just line up the two. They're meant to be fast acquisition sights, and they work well for me. They're also great for someone like me who can't see squat without glasses or contacts. :cool:
 

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The XS sights are really nice. Someone posted a while back witha pic. of em. If I were to upgrade, I might go with that type over 3 dot.
 

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My Nighthawk Enforcer has a blank, unmarked rear sight and a tritium front sight. I didn't think I was going to like it when I bought it, but after taking it to the range I found I actually found it helped in quickly picking up a target and putting it where I wanted it. Below is the only picture I have of the rear sight. Trying to improve on the idea, and since the tritium front sight was a little small, I added a XS Big Dot front sight. While you can get on target very quickly and, no doubt would be good in a defensive situation, the size of the front sight definitely has an effect on the preciseness of your targeting. My plans are to replace the front sight now with a brighter, but smaller, tritium and surround. The blank rear sight, in itself, seems to work pretty well, for me, for point shooting or controlled fire on the range.
 

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My Springfield 1911 came with green night sights front and back - the brightness between the two is about the same, and it works OK for me. I prefer tritium in front and rear sights.

I am interested in having a different color in back to help me focus on the front sight - I believe the sights are Ameriglo Operators. The rear sights are also a little dimmer than the front.
 

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Tactical Course

In a tactical shooting course I took, we were taught to focus on the front sight only for rapid defensive shooting. We were shooting two to four shot strings at multiple targets from 7 to 21 feet. Some scenarios required lateral movement, kneeling behind barriers, rapid reload, etc. This method worked well for me. It's not target shooting, but you can score COM hits this way. Sometimes not all will hit. I remember one string involved four targets with fast as you can lateral movement and two shots each. On the second target I only hit once, but it was a good hit. With this kind of activity and pressure to get it done quickly, front sight aquisition works well.
 

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mike_1 said:
Any one with night sites game to try covering the rear dots with some electrical tape and giving us a report no how you think it would work for you?
Mike
Don't have to - the front sight on my newest 226 is still warm and the rear was never tapped and the dots are painted on.

If I could get a sight picture, it'd be ambient light,not the front sight illuminating things.

If they were that bright, you'd illuminate the entire top of the slide *and* your face.
 

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When you practice point shooting, the sights don't matter, especially from retention (gun at hip,) thrust (gun outstretched at belt level, centered, while slightly crouched,) and shilouette (gun at neck level, low light, using the whole gun as an aiming device.) If you have the luxury of time and the confidence that you'll control your focus, you'll need the front dot and rear dots or bar to get the fastest flash sight alignment. All the better if they glow in the dark. But Seattle PD noticed a disturbing corona effect at night coming from tritiums in humidity or fog. Still, I carry them. Logically, a night encounter will be at extremely close range where point shooting, without sight acquisition, will be used. Positive identification of a more distant target and what's behind it at night won't be easy. In the daytime, painted white dots suffice.
 

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Isn't this kinda like asking if we need a rear sight on our gun? If we believe the rear sight is important in good light, why do we think it is less important in poor lighting conditions?

I can do anything with front and rear night sights that I can do with a front night sight only. But, the reverse is not true. The front-night-sight-only presumes a tight range and a large COM target. What if niether is true? Then we need to see our sights.

I believe both front and rear night sights will solve far more scenarios than the front sight only. If you normally shoot with the front and rear sights, what happens when it's dark, not up tight and big, and suddenly you can't see your rear sight?
 
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