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Been wanting to get it polish/coated, but I can figure out what I actually want to do with it. This is my daily carry so I want something durable, but still looks great.

Just seeing if anyone has some suggestion on which route to go.
 

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My understand is the Tennifer treatment is in the metal, not the coating on the surface, so it should remain durable. Beyond that, Ceracoat is supposed to be pretty good.
 

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+1 on the Cerakote. I've been investigating that process for my G20 and as soon as I decide on a color that's the route I'm taking.
 

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The Tennifer finish is VERY durable. When I attended the Glock Armorers class the instructors rubbed the finish of a Glock with a penny which initially looked liked scratches. He then buffed off the marks with steel wool. I worked and carried Glocks in humid coastal FL prior to my retirement. They never rusted or pitted. I would save your $$$ and put it towards ammo to feed your Glock!
 

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If I were going to re-finish any Glock, it would be with the Nickel Boron that these guys do. I've seen a few Glocks with Nickel Boron Slides and barrels, and they are well done. Nickel boron is a very, very durable process. I'm done with anythng Duracoated or Ceracoated.....they all eventually chip and look like crap.

WMD Guns: Gun Coating and Firearm Coating
 

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Actually looking at the KG Gunkote in brushed stainless . Any ideas on that stuff ?
a shiny slide could produce glare between the sights, a fighting gun is better off left in black IMO.

like a few members have already pointed out the factory finish is not a coating but rather a treatment that goes a few microns deep into the metal and is very durable, perhaps more so then any coating. while it may get some scratches and holster wear around the edges it will not chip like the coatings do.

Ferritic nitrocarburizing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

if it ain`t broke, don't fix it. unless the factory finish is already beat to hell i would leave it alone and spend the money on ammo and training, or a nice holster.
 

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The Tenifer is an excellent, durable finish:

To understand this method, we must first understand a few basic properties of iron and steel. Some materials, such as iron and steel, can exist with different crystalline structures. These different crystalline structures cause the same material to have different physical properties (e.g. different hardness, elasticity etc.). These different crystal structures are called "phases". Examples of such phases are: ferritic phase, austenitic phase, martensitic phase, ledeburite phase, pearlite phase etc. Both iron and steel can be switched from one phase to another by heating to different temperatures and adding other elements and cooling at different rates to change the crystalline structure of the product.

The basic concept behind the Ferritic Nitrocarburizing method is to introduce nitrogen and carbon to the steel when its crystal structure is still in the Ferritic phase. The temperature when this is done ranges from between 525-650 degrees centigrade. The first Ferritic Nitrocarburizing treatment process was invented by UK chemical giant, Imperial Chemical Laboratories (ICL), who came up with a process of dropping the workpiece in a sulfur salt bath at 550 degrees centigrade. This process was called Sulfinuz treatment because of the sulfur salt content. It was mainly used for cutting tools and high speed spindle parts, but it had problems with cleaning the solution off.
TENIFER (Trademark): Unique GLOCK hi-tech surface refinement for barrel and slide. Apart from optimum corrosion protection and anti-reflective finish, a degree of hardness of 64 HRC - close to that of a diamond - is achieved.
Why would you do that?

Save your money?
 
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