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Running bone-stock internals on my two 9mm's yielding 5.5 lb pulls. I'm looking for a crisper (lighter?) overall better trigger. Both pistols are carry guns. Thanks


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An incredibly simple, quick, and cheap trick is to put a bit of grease on all the contact points of the trigger mechanism. This smooths out the trigger quite a bit and makes it feel lighter. It doesn't make it crisper, though, which is ultimately why I sold almost all my Glocks.
 

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I had a trigger job done at a gun show on my 19 that made it just over 3lbs. Result scared me for an EDC gun so next gun show I found him and paid him again to reverse it. I am so used to the stock trigger I don't think about it anymore.
 
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I had a trigger job done at a gun show on my 19 that made it just over 3lbs. Result scared me for an EDC gun so next gun show I found him and paid him again to reverse it. I am so used to the stock trigger I don't think about it anymore.
I agree. I almost traded a G26 for a G19 with a ~3lb trigger, and I was going to swap the trigger groups to get the G19 back to a normal tension.
 

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I bought the Skimmer trigger by Travis Haley for my gen 4 G26 (although they also make it for the gen 3). It claims to give your glock trigger the feel of a 1911 trigger. While it doesn't quite do that it will reduce take up and give a crisper and lighter break. It costs less than $200 and requires no gunsmithing. It only took me a few minutes to install it.
 

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I've got a gen 2 and (3) gen 3's that have excellent trigger pulls.
Also my old Gen 3 G22.

But they have been shot a lot over the years.

Like drmordo suggested; a little dab of grease on the firing pin safety and disconnect make a lot of difference.
 

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100's of companys that make triggers for the Glock ..The Pyrmid and more come to mind

Me I dont tend to mod the triggers on carry guns unless I really need to ...One less thing to be brought up if it is a Gray shooting ( ie you know your in the right but boy things dont look that way)
 

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Running bone-stock internals on my two 9mm's yielding 5.5 lb pulls. I'm looking for a crisper (lighter?) overall better trigger. Both pistols are carry guns. Thanks


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5.5#is listed by Glock as a perfect EDC carry weight. I would not change that at all. I asked the expert Mas Ayoob about this the other day. As I like the flat trigger from Glockkraft. His response was it is fine to change the trigger and trigger bar as long as the weight doesn't go below 5.5#. That is the manufacturers stated carry pull weight
 

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For a carry gun, all I'd do is polish up the internals a bit, lube the contact points and shoot it a lot. I've had quite a few different high-end aftermarket triggers that make the Glock feel completely different, but you have to be careful with some of them since some designs reduce pretravel to the point of compromising the drop safety (easy to check though). A stock Glock trigger will be plenty smooth for self-defense distances/shooting if you shoot it a lot.
 

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As the others have suggested a little bit of grease and lots of shooting works well. I use Shooters Choice High Tech Grease currently but have also used TW-25B. Got a friend that uses Frog Lube. They all seem to work well.
 

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25 cent trigger job

Running bone-stock internals on my two 9mm's yielding 5.5 lb pulls. I'm looking for a crisper (lighter?) overall better trigger. Both pistols are carry guns. Thanks


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I did the 25 cent trigger job on all my Glocks. It didn't change the trigger pull weight, but definitely made it crisper.
 

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5.5#is listed by Glock as a perfect EDC carry weight. I would not change that at all. I asked the expert Mas Ayoob about this the other day. As I like the flat trigger from Glockkraft. His response was it is fine to change the trigger and trigger bar as long as the weight doesn't go below 5.5#. That is the manufacturers stated carry pull weight
Of all of the Glocks I have owned, and that would be quite a few over the years, not one came in at the stated trigger pull weight printed on their label. Not one. All came in over their printed weight. For my primary carry guns, I want the trigger to come in at an honest measurement of between 4 pounds 12 ounces and 5 pounds 6-8 ounces. Most come in within a few ounces of five pounds after I have done my own trigger work. Two of my Glocks have really beautiful triggers, right at five pounds with a crisp break and a short reset.

The Glock trigger is very simple to work on to get a very good trigger for a primary carry gun, and you needn't spend much money to get this. Basically it's a simple tune up and anyone can do this... just watch what you're doing and don't get too carried away. I can outline what I do for those who are interested.

BTW, Mr. Ayoob's comments about trigger tuning doesn't necessarily come from creating too light of a trigger but rather from the position that doing this could result in working against you in a court of law by an aggressive prosecutor out to get you for your actions. Fortunately for me, tuning my triggers is a non-issue in my state.
 

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BTW, Mr. Ayoob's comments about trigger tuning doesn't necessarily come from creating too light of a trigger but rather from the position that doing this could result in working against you in a court of law by an aggressive prosecutor out to get you for your actions. Fortunately for me, tuning my triggers is a non-issue in my state.
This is correct. And I live in NY,,,which is almost as bad as Cali
 

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I run a 3.5 lb connector with stock Springs. Gives me a nice crisp 5lb pull with minimal take up and short reset. Cost me 20 bucks and 5 minutes of my time

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Strip ALL (every bit of) the lube. Run 500 rounds, doing whatever it takes to continue. Disassemble & perform a $.25 trigger tune (re:GLOCKTALK.com). Lube lightly at only the manual-directed locations. Reassemble & (happily) carry on. :yup:
 
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I updated my Gen4 G26 with a Ghost trigger connector. Smoother trigger, and shorter reset. They aren't very expensive.

Running bone-stock internals on my two 9mm's yielding 5.5 lb pulls. I'm looking for a crisper (lighter?) overall better trigger. Both pistols are carry guns. Thanks


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For a carry gun, all I'd do is polish up the internals a bit, lube the contact points and shoot it a lot. I've had quite a few different high-end aftermarket triggers that make the Glock feel completely different, but you have to be careful with some of them since some designs reduce pretravel to the point of compromising the drop safety (easy to check though). A stock Glock trigger will be plenty smooth for self-defense distances/shooting if you shoot it a lot.
As the others have suggested a little bit of grease and lots of shooting works well. I use Shooters Choice High Tech Grease currently but have also used TW-25B. Got a friend that uses Frog Lube. They all seem to work well.
I would tend to be in this camp here^^^^^ I wouldn't worry about a Glock trigger on a pistol used solely for SD. Just get some adequate range time with them(the firearms) and call it a day. Light grease and be done.
 

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I'm liking some of these suggestions, but I don't think I willing to sacrifice and positive reset for the sake of a lighter trigger. I have heard some aftermarket connectors tend to do this. Thoughts?
 

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I think that one of the reasons that some folks are happy with their Glock triggers and others are not is simply due to variation in Glocks production stamping process. If you ever look under magnification at a Glock trigger transfer bar or connector, you'll see a horribly rough shear bread edge. No doubt some are a little less rough than others due to variation in the production process. About 10 years ago I decided to conduct a little experiment to see if I could take advantage of this manufacturing variation to come up with a better-feeling trigger in my Gen 3 G19 using all stock components. I purchased (3) trigger/transfer bar assemblies and (3) connectors- all original Glock parts - and numbered each one. I then spent a good part of my weekend doing component swaps. With each combination, I measured trigger pull with a Lyman digital gauge, as well as assigned a subjective 'touchy-feely' score, in an attempt to find a BOB (best-of-the-best) combination. I found there was very little variation in trigger pulls (maybe +/- 0.5 lb) between the various combinations, but some combos were much, much smoother than other combos. I was able to narrow down to a particular set of (unmodified) components that resulted in a very smooth pull but still broke at > 5#. Since then I have put probably more than 10,000 rounds and 2 recoil springs through this gun, and you can't believe how smooth the trigger has gotten. I measure the trigger on occasion and it will still break at > 5 #. I think I spent about $40-50 on the parts, which seemed pretty cheap after spending a few hundred $ on aftermarket trigger assemblies. I have since used this procedure on a couple of other Gen 3s. I have not felt the need to modify any of my Gen 4s.
 

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I'm liking some of these suggestions, but I don't think I willing to sacrifice and positive reset for the sake of a lighter trigger. I have heard some aftermarket connectors tend to do this. Thoughts?
When I install a different connector, it is always one of Glock's connectors... as in their formerly labeled "3.5 connector". One time I did install an after market connector and it failed once (a number of years ago and I don't recall how it failed). Since then I have always used Glock's own connectors.
 
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