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I work at a fairly good size hospital that is also a trauma center. We have monthly Trauma Grand Rounds and CME (Continuing Medical Education) meetings in which someone presents on a topic to a large group of Physicians, Hospital Staff, and some general public. We have had several Trauma Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, and other physicians give presentations on various Trauma subjects and most recently on gunshot wounds.

The physician who is the Director of the Education programs has overheard me and some of the Trauma Doctors talking about firearms and going to the range. He never misses a chance to give me a hard time about guns. Several days ago he was sitting at our table during lunch and he started in on me again about my guns and being a gun owner, asking me very specific questions about guns, self defense, etc. So, as I calmly and factually answered his questions and shared my philosophy on responsible gun ownership and safety precautions I take, my approach, and my mentality of avoiding conflict, de-escalating, and how carrying a firearm has made me a much more cautious person he seemed genuinely interested.

At that time he made a comment on how Gun Safety would be a great CME presentation given our recent Trauma Grand Rounds subjects. Today, he and our Trauma Medical Director approached me and asked me to give a presentation on September 5th. I absolutely and graciously accepted their offer and have started putting together a presentation outline, powerpoint, and am gathering pictures and video.

Given the fact that there are many liberal anti-gun people in the population I will be addressing, my presentation will not necessarily be advocating for or against gun ownership. That is an individual decision and it is not the right decision for everyone. My purpose will be to provide objective information regarding various types of firearms, safe gun handling rules, proper storing of weapons, proper manners of carrying (proper holsters that cover the trigger guard), and resources for those interested in learning the laws of this or any other state regarding firearms.

The CEO has suggested that I have some firearms there and he would provide me with written authorization to have unloaded firearms present in the education facility for the purpose of safety training, but I'm somewhat hesitant to do that. I'm not sure what that could possibly add that some embedded pictures and videos couldn't bring to the event.

In any event, I'm very excited about the opportunity to provide education and information to what is typically a crowd of several hundred. Hopefully it will shed some new light on gun ownership. As I get my presentation pulled together, I may post it here to get feedback from you all. There's a wealth of knowledge, experience, and wisdom on this site!!!
 

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I think that having visual aids in the form of actual weapons that could be handled under very controlled circumstances would be some some benefit, at least to some of the target audience. Some familiarization with the subject weapons, especially any they might come into contact with in the course of their duties, could prevent an unfortunate incident. Pictures and videos are good, but are never a substitute for actual hand's on.

Good luck!
 

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One thing that you might want to cover is what to do if some patient comes in with a weapon present - not a shooter, but perhaps an unconscious victim. That's the kind of situation that they may see someday, and it will keep their attention.
You can start with the common-ness of people carrying weapons - from Gang bangers to Police officers to legal concealed carriers. They can't tell who may have a firearm on them.

I'm not the most qualified to answer this question, but it may include:
- Leave it in the holster if it is in one. A good holster keeps a firearm safe by covering the trigger area.
- You don't have to touch it if you don't want to - find someone like a police officer that might understand firearms that is more comfortable.
- If you have to touch it (ie: it's not in a holster), do NOT put your finder in the trigger guard, handle it by the handle with 2 fingers only.
- do not clear the firearm unless you know what you are doing.
- If you clear it, leave the action opened for all to see that it is empty.
- If handling it, even if in a holster, ALWAYS keep it pointed in a safe direction.

Also, I like the idea of having firearms present. You should carry them in in a case, and open the cases with everyone present. If you explain that you emptied all of them before you left home, and then proceed to double and triple check each one that it is unloaded (and have someone else double-double check), that will help tham understand the normal safety procedures that many of us do all of the time. Always keeping the firearm you are demonstrating with pointed in a safe direction (not at the audience) will re-emphasize the safety procedures even more. If you look a little awkward always trying to keep the firearms pointed in a safe direction, that's ok.

You may be able to borrow a blue training gun from a LGS or whereever you got your CC training. That would be good for some of the demonstrations where you don't want to use an actual firearm (like a "don't do this" section).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
One thing that you might want to cover is what to do if some patient comes in with a weapon present - not a shooter, but perhaps an unconscious victim. That's the kind of situation that they may see someday, and it will keep their attention.
You can start with the common-ness of people carrying weapons - from Gang bangers to Police officers to legal concealed carriers. They can't tell who may have a firearm on them.

I'm not the most qualified to answer this question, but it may include:
- Leave it in the holster if it is in one. A good holster keeps a firearm safe by covering the trigger area.
- You don't have to touch it if you don't want to - find someone like a police officer that might understand firearms that is more comfortable.
- If you have to touch it (ie: it's not in a holster), do NOT put your finder in the trigger guard, handle it by the handle with 2 fingers only.
- do not clear the firearm unless you know what you are doing.
- If you clear it, leave the action opened for all to see that it is empty.
- If handling it, even if in a holster, ALWAYS keep it pointed in a safe direction.

Also, I like the idea of having firearms present. You should carry them in in a case, and open the cases with everyone present. If you explain that you emptied all of them before you left home, and then proceed to double and triple check each one that it is unloaded (and have someone else double-double check), that will help tham understand the normal safety procedures that many of us do all of the time. Always keeping the firearm you are demonstrating with pointed in a safe direction (not at the audience) will re-emphasize the safety procedures even more. If you look a little awkward always trying to keep the firearms pointed in a safe direction, that's ok.

You may be able to borrow a blue training gun from a LGS or whereever you got your CC training. That would be good for some of the demonstrations where you don't want to use an actual firearm (like a "don't do this" section).
Outstanding suggestions!!! I'll be sure to do as you have suggested. Keeping it relevant to the audience's perspective (when or how they may encounter a firearm in the course of patient care) and what they may expect and how to proceed. Excellent advice, thanks.
 

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ElkSniper has a great approach in target audience (no pun intended).

Please consider in your power point an image illustrating each of the four gun safety rules of Col. Jeff Cooper.
All guns are always loaded.
Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on the target.
Be sure of your target and what is beyond it.
—Jeff Cooper
This would be good before the target audience part as that part will reinforce what you show them of the rules.
 

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The CEO has suggested that I have some firearms there and he would provide me with written authorization to have unloaded firearms present in the education facility for the purpose of safety training, but I'm somewhat hesitant to do that. I'm not sure what that could possibly add that some embedded pictures and videos couldn't bring to the event.
As others have suggested, photos are fine, but having hands-on visual aids can make or break a talk. There's nothing like getting something in your hand to help folks understand how it works. Might help dispel myths. Might even help dispel fears.

Might also want to include a "blue" gun (training gun), when covering aspects of safety, useful tools while training (ie, for disarm/retention skills).
 

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I think this is a fantastic opportunity , but be prepared for the anti-gun nazis. Explicitly state at the beginning that it will not be an open forum for the discussion of owning firearms. In a large group of people, you are bound to find a numbskull who's only gun knowledge is what biden taught him, and he will think himself a subject matter expert.
 

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Kudos on your decision to present the information in an unbiased manner... it may help some of the more liberal audience members actually absorb some good information. As far as bringing real firearms, I think any time the general public can be exposed to firearms in a positive manner it's a good thing. See if you can borow one of those non-functional "cut out" firearm models from a local gun shop. You also may want to consider training at least one ER staff member per shift to handle firearms, in case EMS misses it and security is un-available.
 

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As others have suggested, photos are fine, but having hands-on visual aids can make or break a talk. There's nothing like getting something in your hand to help folks understand how it works. Might help dispel myths. Might even help dispel fears.

Might also want to include a "blue" gun (training gun), when covering aspects of safety, useful tools while training (ie, for disarm/retention skills).
I second these suggestions, a lot of people like to "see with their hands", blue/orange guns are perfect for that. Ideally, try and get one of the training models that has a functioning trigger and slide instead of just being a hard rubber block.
 

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BD, what an opportunity! Kudos to you for taking the initiative to provide some positive, fact-based information.

Just a couple of random thoughts. I would leave any real firearms behind, although a blue training gun would be a good prop. Given your work environment, I think the potential for some strong objections about having guns on site is pretty high. But you can subtly suggest that you're open to private discussions about handling actual firearms. Your main mission here is to de-mystify firearms for the grossly uninitiated, and to remind the cowboys on staff about the 4 rules and handling "foreign" guns when they show up.

Keep us posted on your curriculum as it develops!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My hesitation to have real firearms stems from a few very outspoken anti-gun physicians on staff who had total meltdowns at one of our Quarterly Medical Staff Meetings at the discussion about having a Sheriff's substation on campus (i.e. "Guns in a hospital?" hysteria, even over Police having guns in a building on the campus). The last thing I need is someone (or more than one) derailing the whole thing by getting hysterical. Having some blue guns that fit some of my holsters so I could demonstrate how they may encounter a patient with a concealed firearm would serve the purpose without giving anyone any reasonable cause to freak (although they may anyway). I have no doubt there will be at least one (if not more) who will consider it a stage in which to put on an anti-gun show. The Physician who is the Director of Education (also on the Hospital Board) will nip it in the bud post haste and I'll be sure to discuss that with him in advance.
 

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...given his history with you on guns, I wouldn't trust him...and I wouldn't take my guns...and to put a gun in the hands of a stranger even in a classroom could be disastrous...what if they had a round...just wouldn't do it...I agree with you that the purpose could be served without any actual weapons being brought in...or on your person...seems he's had quite a turnaround and I just feel the hairs up on the back of my neck...
 

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My hesitation to have real firearms stems from a few very outspoken anti-gun physicians on staff who had total meltdowns at one of our Quarterly Medical Staff Meetings at the discussion about having a Sheriff's substation on campus ... I have no doubt there will be at least one (if not more) who will consider it a stage in which to put on an anti-gun show.
Your CEO could lay down the law prior to the discussion, making it clear this is not going to be a stage for politics or pro/anti-gun hysteria. It's a physical demonstration, little different than, say, introduction of how to deal with the potential threat an AIDS/SARS patient, or handling a patient who's brought in but found to have a syringe/needle in the pocket.
 

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As others have suggested, I would focus solely on the following:

1. Where and when staff might reasonably expect to encounter firearms in the hospital setting.
2. Who might have firearms and where on their person they might have them (i.e. police officers, private security guards/investigators, CCW holders, criminals).
3. How to safely and legally handle, make safe, secure, and record the firearm. I believe the ideal policy in most non-law enforcement cases (in which other officers would usually be there to secure the injured officer's firearm and duty equipment) would be to handle a gun as little as possible, inform the owner about what you are doing with it, secure it in a monitored and locked property cabinet, and record the make, model, description, and serial number for a property receipt.
 

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Congratulations that's a great gig, and good opportunity to educate some folks and dispel some gun myths.

I'm guessing it wouldn't be a good time for you to point out the number of people killed by physicians each year vs handgun deaths? :rolleyes:
 

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Bugdude, I have some NRA videos from my instructor manuals. If you would like to use them, let me know. Ill help with anything I can....
 
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Sounds like a fantastic opportunity for you. From my perspective as a professional instructor (not firearms), I believe actual objects teach better than props or photos. Consider the problem: some folks don't understand firearms, and therefore fear them. This may be an opportunity for you to help alleviate some of those fears by helping them understand that that is a real weapon on the table, and look, it's not shooting anybody.

For your outspoken anti crowd, well, maybe this could just be another chance for them to make an ass out of themselves and let everyone see their irrationality.

In any case, good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Bugdude, I have some NRA videos from my instructor manuals. If you would like to use them, let me know. Ill help with anything I can....
That would be great! Thanks!
 
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