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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is just going to be a friendly rant...

i feel like, correction i know, i got interested in reloading ammo a little to late. i started researching it in january with my mom who wants to go in halfsies with me on it. well come to find out after i research all that i would need and make a list to order everything. the only things i can find are the press and thats about it. everything else you will be overpaying on and when it comes down to it your better off just buying ammo from the store.

i could probably find the ingredients and parts that i need but i do not feel like overpaying for them right at this moment.

but for now i am patiently waiting until this craze has passed and once it has i will get back into the ordering/starting of my reloading adventures. hopefully its soon :) and from what i have heard patience is a virtue but i think its also torture!

any thoughts, questions, or concerns?
 

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Patience lad, patience.

Get your press, and scale and assorted tools. Dies and some shell plates are a bit scarce right now, but not as scarce as loaded ammo. Brass and bullets are generally back-orderable. While you wait for primers and powder to become available, make sure you get at least two reloading manuals (I recommend the Hornady, Lee and Lyman books, in no specific order) and read the "how to" text up front.
 

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When ever you shoot, pick up your brass. IMO if you have to buy brass your savings go out the door. If you shoot at a range, always come home with more brass than you took.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yes the dies are one of the hardest things to find right now! and if u find them they are going for alot more than what they are normally. i should do some back ordering...if i did that back then i would probably have some supplies! doh. i should have enough brass between my mom and i that are still loaded. i have the Lee Reloading manual but i will look into getting another one. thanks for that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When ever you shoot, pick up your brass. IMO if you have to buy brass your savings go out the door. If you shoot at a range, always come home with more brass than you took.
i agree! wasting money on brass will bring down the savings. im lucky to when i go to the police shoots i pick up extra brass :)
 

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Reloading is like anything else for me, not really done for cost as much as personal satisfaction. Nothing like the sound of something you made going off and seeing it work. I don't always reload what I shoot but when I do reload :there is a lot bigger fun and satisfaction factor. There are availability and accuracy factors that some reloaders consider important over cost. Buy what you need and just be sparring with the inventory, you should not put off something that you will really enjoy because of high prices, just buy the press and other materials for something you really enjoy shooting and have fun. Thats money well spent if it gives you pleasure. You might be surprised how much fun you can have for instance scrounging around for the lead to cast your own bullets or just the pleasure of letting some other person tell you about a pet load that they are really proud of ...you might even be the one doing the talking. Sometimes we forget that we work for something more than just survival.
If I was just looking at the cost factor: my time is worth more than I would save.
 

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If I was just looking at the cost factor: my time is worth more than I would save.
That's why I've held off from investing in reloading thus far. The only benefit to me would be if the components were not scarce when ammo is. However, since component availability tracks right along with manufactured ammo availability, I figure that I may as well continue to bulk-buy manufactured ammo when it's cheap, knowing that there's always going to be another panic-buy around the corner, and saving my spare time for things that I really like to do.
 

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If I was just looking at the cost factor: my time is worth more than I would save.
I buy components in quantity and as cheap as I can get them I also cast my own bullets,a 100 round bulf pack of 45acp is around $40-$45 I reload 100 rounds for about $6 so thats a savinggs of around $34 100 x 400 rounds an hour is $128 you must have one great paying job.
Your running into the same problem as 4 years ago,ammo started drying up so everybody decided it was a good time to reload and started a run on powder primers and bullets,About 10 years ago I had an epiphany and somehow saw this coming so I started investing in equipment that has paid for itself many times over and I never run out of ammo,any ammo I need I just reload including 223 which is almost impossible to find unless you wanta pay out the nose, I make my own bullets out of spent 22 brass and reload 223 for about .10 cents a round
 

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When ever you shoot, pick up your brass. IMO if you have to buy brass your savings go out the door. If you shoot at a range, always come home with more brass than you took.
One of the reasons why I got into revolvers. No chasing brass
 
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I buy components in quantity and as cheap as I can get them I also cast my own bullets,a 100 round bulf pack of 45acp is around $40-$45 I reload 100 rounds for about $6 so thats a savinggs of around $34 100 x 400 rounds an hour is $128 you must have one great paying job.
Your running into the same problem as 4 years ago,ammo started drying up so everybody decided it was a good time to reload and started a run on powder primers and bullets,About 10 years ago I had an epiphany and somehow saw this coming so I started investing in equipment that has paid for itself many times over and I never run out of ammo,any ammo I need I just reload including 223 which is almost impossible to find unless you wanta pay out the nose, I make my own bullets out of spent 22 brass and reload 223 for about .10 cents a round
You have a great deal more money invested in your equipment than the average person trying to decide if reloading 200 rounds a month is cost effective. Of course you can bring this down to numbers and make it sound unbelievably cheap to reload your own ammo but you are not comparing apples to apples here.
And I do have a very well paying job to the point that saving $128 for the "off time" time invested in casting 400 bullets, cleaning brass, and reloading 400 rounds is not IMO time well spent in regards to the money saved. I expect the above reference would include much more time than the one hour you are referencing.
You are the one to decide if your pleasure derived from spending that time is worth it to you as I am in regards to my time. I was simply offering reasons other than "saving money" that might make reloading worthwhile to the average hobbiest.
 

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Things are scarce, but as to equipment, if you are getting shaken down locally, do some on-line shopping. The most reputable suppliers do not appear to be trying to take advantage of the situation by jacking up prices. As already noted, your first step needs to be acquiring one or two quality reloading manuals. Get educated before you buy.
 

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I am reloading with components (other than powder) that I bought during the Clinton Scare in the 1990's. I also collected brass every evening at the Gun Range I worked at part time. In 2002 I bought almost 500 lbs of 9MM, 40, and 45 Bullets from Zero in upper Alabama. This and other purchases in the last 8 years have me and my brother flush in components to reload with. Yes, we come home with more brass than we shoot. This is a good time to get started in the reloading business as used components are on the ground. Get as many as you can. When the time is right other things will become available. It is a small steps before big steps program. My two presses were bought in the early 1990's and still run 100% with no issues. I can still get free parts for any thing that breaks on them. Reloading has more than paid for itself for me. It will take some time for the newcomers to realize this, but it will so keep the faith and keep a sharp eye out to get things when they present themselves.
 

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I just shot 100rds of my .40 reloads this afternoon. I couldn't shoot near as many rounds if I didn't make my own. I also enjoy the process.
 

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Things will settle down, I got for my son a Lee Kit. with the dies it was still under $200 to get him loading. With my own lead bullets I can load 45ACP for $12 per 50 and $9 per 50 of 9mm. so a considerable savings on the 45 but not so much on the 9mm. But I can still shoot my 9mm where friends are looking for ammo. I shoot a lot of 45 colt. The savings on a box of them is about 2/3. DR
 

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I was rearranging my ammo stores 3 or 4 days ago. I came across 20R of 12G reloads I made in 1985.

Get yourself a Lee Loader. They will last you forever.
 

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I agree with most of the previous posters. Get another reloading manual or two, esp. the Lyman manual. You need to keep a sharp eye out both on the Internet and at the LGS's for powders/primers/bullets, etc. but they are out there if you're diligent. Don't shy away from going the cast lead bullet route either, not that you have to cast your own (which you certain can), but they are much less expensive to shoot than jacketed bullets. You don't need all the bells and whistles as far as equipment when first starting out either. You can add the fancier stuff as you go, once you're sure you're in it for the long haul. Talk to some experienced reloaders, get some of questions answered from them if you can. The NRA actually offers a reloading class too. One thing, never take loads at face value off the Internet except from the manufacturers!!!
 

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Some people don't have the time to reload,and as far as getting cheaper components by buying larger quantities online it may be necessary to find 2 or 3 people to split the cost of a bulk order of primers and powder once things return to somewhat normal,acquire all the lead wheel weights you can get your hands on to melt down,a LEE Bullet mold will cost about $20-$35 dollars and a bottom pour pot is around $70.Instead of investing in a lubrisizer you can get the Tumble lube molds and lube with liquid alox.When ammo is abundant you may prefer to buy it,but when it disappears fire up the equipment and cast and reload what you need,no burning gas running to stores/standing in lines/passing out from sticker shock etc.

Due to the panic I had to wait several weeks for 223 rifle powder,watching several suppliers to wait til I saw some in stock and then after ordering it it took about a month to get notice it shipped,in the past it took about 10 days to my door

As far as swaging 223 bullets from spent 22LR brass it's gonna cost around $1000 - $1200 for the equipment,but they have been asking up to and over $1.00 a round,so in all reality at those prices you will recoup your investment and HAVE AMMO on hand after reloading about 1500 rounds
If your buying bullets,especially jacketed bullets then your savings are gonna be a lot less
 

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Anyone who shoots more than once a month should reload. Casting your own bullets is the least expensive way to go. I just thought of a source for wheel weights. Your local junk yard. All you need is a pair of pliers to remove the weights. Gonna call mine when they open.
Anyway, pistol rounds can be loaded for about 5 cents each. In todays market that's a huge saving. Actual time is relatively minimal compared to time spent driving & surfing searching for ammo. I have a basic setup. To run 250-300 rounds takes approximately 4 hours. That includes casting the bullets. Cost is 12.50 for 250 rounds.
Can't beat it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
thanks for all of the insight, sorry i cant comment/reply to everyone but all the information is much appreciated! i will def buy another manual, research more and hope for the best haha
 
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