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I had to make a trip to my general practitioner today for some lingering problems I've finally go fed up with. I have not been there in two years so they had me fill out the obligatory forms. On one of the forms it asked me if I had a gun in the house. I answered yes. I suspect my physician is as liberal as they come. It will be interesting to see if anything is said going forward. I may be going back quite frequently if they can't find the problem. Stay tuned.
 

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I had to make a trip to my general practitioner today for some lingering problems I've finally go fed up with. I have not been there in two years so they had me fill out the obligatory forms. On one of the forms it asked me if I had a gun in the house. I answered yes. I suspect my physician is as liberal as they come. It will be interesting to see if anything is said going forward. I may be going back quite frequently if they can't find the problem. Stay tuned.
I would have wrote none of their business. I have already instructed both of my children to give that answer if any doctor, dentist, etc asks that question.
 

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I'd leave any question I felt was not relevant to the medical exam blank. Doesn't matter if it is about guns or something else. If they don't like it too bad.
 

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Huh?
Why is it any other their business?
My standard answer for questions like that is "NOYFB" or "NA" if I'm in a good mood.
I am lucky though my doc is a gun nut and a hunting nut and a fishing nut. Some of the conversations we have are about more than just health:smile:
 

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Heh...I don't fill out any of them except the pertinent questions(symptoms, family history, etc...). Everything else gets left blank. Don't give them any room. If you answer some of them and only skip the obvious ones (firearms drugs etc...) then that leaves them room to think about it and form their own "opinion". By not answering ANY of them, they can't form any opinion :rolleyes:...

Sometimes the lack of knowledge is power.:bier:
 

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I have already instructed both of my children to give that answer if any doctor, dentist, etc asks that question.
:yup:

My standard answer for questions like that is "NOYFB" or "NA" if I'm in a good mood.
Good answers. And if I see that question on a form, I'm not going to be in a good mood, so I'll probably never make it to "NA". :aargh4:
 

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what in the world.....

i would state N/A because it is none of their business.
 

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Huh?
Why is it any other their business?
My standard answer for questions like that is "NOYFB" or "NA" if I'm in a good mood.
I am lucky though my doc is a gun nut and a hunting nut and a fishing nut. Some of the conversations we have are about more than just health:smile:
I hope you don't mind me borrowing your answer from now on Rugergirl.
 

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I prefer the NOYFB...:yup:
 

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I've yet to be asked that question by a doctor or anyone else that thinks they have any "authority", but in my neighborhood it would be a really stupid question to ask anyway.

If asked on a "form", it would be left blank... then if asked verbally, it may just be the NOYFB answer...and NOT the acronymn. But I look "old and chrotchity"....I could pull it off:image035:

Premature gray (o.k....white) has it's advantages.


surv
 

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I wouldn't have answered the question. That is none of your doctors business, period. If you felt obligated to answer the question, answer NO!
 

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I would not have answered that question either and would have just left it blank. :yup:
 

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I take a yearly hearing test at my company given by a contractor. Their questionnaire had a couple of questions I didn't much care for or answer about shooting guns. I let them know right off this was not pertinent information and frankly none of their business. The sign up sheets would also lay around on supervisors' desks the previous week with everyone's social security numbers in the open until the paperwork was given to the employee for the test. They don't do either of these things anymore. Now we just go and give our name when entering the testing van.
 

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Like others here, that particular question has no bearing on my medical conditions and if I ever see it on any medical questionaires, there will also be no answer.
 

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I take a yearly hearing test at my company given by a contractor. Their questionnaire had a couple of questions I didn't much care for or answer about shooting guns. I let them know right off this was not pertinent information and frankly none of their business. The sign up sheets would also lay around on supervisors' desks the previous week with everyone's social security numbers in the open until the paperwork was given to the employee for the test. They don't do either of these things anymore. Now we just go and give our name when entering the testing van.
I suspect that the question prior to a hearing test has more to do with any potential hearing issues that they might want to pay particular attention to if someone is routinely exposed to loud noises such as gunfire...... As such, it might very well have so medical importance.
 

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Although I love "NOYFB".......I tend to tell people who ask that I don't discuss, confirm, or deny any of the security measures that we take (or don't take) at home, with anyone outside of immediate family. On a form it gets left blank.
 

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The other perspective

Greetings all, I'm relatively new to this blog but have been reading daily for a while now. I appreciate the insight I've gained in reading various threads. I have found a lot of good information here.

I just wanted to try and provide some of the other perspective as to why you might get asked about access to firearms at your physician's office.

I'm a long time gun owner and have been trained by my father (a NRA instructor) on proper care and handling since childhood. I currently have a HCP for TN and carry. I am also board certified in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. All this being said, at every adult or pediatric physical I ask if there are firearms in the home.

I feel my job at physicals as your physician is to assess your overall health and try to prevent all the common causes of mortality and morbidity. That is, my job is to try and prevent premature death or disability while maintaining the healthiest lifestyle possible. To that end I ask about all sorts of lifestyle choices and risk factors including smoking, exercise, diet, seat belt use, prior screening tests, immunizations, depression symptoms and so forth. So what are the common causes of death and disability in America? Obviously heart disease and cancer are the two big ones for adults. What about teenagers? The number one cause of death in teenagers is accidents caused by either motor vehicles or firearms. This includes homicide and suicide by firearms. So I ask parents and their teens about seat belt usage and if there are firearms in the home. In doing so I have the opportunity to discuss proper safety measures they might want to think about if they haven't already.

Now pretty much everyone on this website will by definition already have thought about safety measures and how to secure their firearms when not in use. There are a lot of people out there that don't know that though. I have the obligation to help them in that area. My spiel goes something like this. "Are there any firearms in the home? The reason I ask is that one of the leading causes of death in teenagers is accidents, including homicide and suicide, involving firearms. Now, I'm as big of a supporter of the Second Amendment as anyone and own my own firearms but if you have trigger locks, gun safes, and proper training you can greatly reduce that risk of death. And remember even if our children are well trained and respect firearms their friends might not so lets make sure our firearms are secured properly." It is simple, straightforward, and polite. I use similar language to discuss why seal belts are a good idea, why smoking is a bad idea, why exercise and proper diet make sense, and a lot of other issues.

In adults I ask the same question for two reasons. First, by law they are responsible for their children's safety. Hence, they need to make sure to secure any weapons they have. Second, up to 7.5% of adult Americans are currently suffering from depression severe enough to effect their ability to function that means at least one adult patient in my average day at the office will be struggling with depression. The number one method of suicide in depressed people is by self inflicted gunshot wounds. If I ask about depression and firearms in adults it is to try and help avoid that outcome.

So, I really want people to consider that physician's are generally working toward the patient's good and trying to identify problems before they become dangerous. Just like a good range officer is looking out for those under his care and trying to make sure there isn't a bad outcome. We as physician's are not interested in your home security measures or secretly working for some conspiracy against 2a. It is about preserving your quality of life and your health. The physician patient relationship is built on trust anyway. No law and no court can break that. Everything is in the strictest confidence, but if you don't want to answer something that is fine. Just say so politely or better yet ask why they are asking the question so we can talk about it.

I've had great experiences with this approach. People are generally very receptive on how to doing things well. I've even had the opportunity to connect people with my Firearms Safety Course instructor so they could get their carry permit too.

Anyway, thanks again for all the advice in the many other threads I've read. I appreciate the years of experience from which I can learn. I'm sure it will continue.
 

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I'm guessing the question relates to possible depression or other mental illness. I'm not going to tell anyone that they are under any obligation to answer the question anyway, I'm just saying that it doesn't necessarily have sinister implications. I take anti-depressants, and every time I go to the doctor, regardless of the reason, they ask me if I am being threatened or feel threatened, etc. Weird stuff, but part of the routine. Interestingly, they don't ask me if I own a gun.
 

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No matter what their reason for asking, it does not change the fact that it is none of their business. If they were really concerned they would ask about how many cars you have, when the last time you had your furnace serviced, when the last time you had your ducts cleaned, etc. This is nothing but a phishing scam.
 
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