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Nice! A buddy of mine has one; very smooth action and fairly accurate. What fun!
 

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Yea Chuck!

Lot's of history and a really neato design right there on your table. .303's a good cartridge, good as anyone could want.

Still relevant in this household. Several live here.
 

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Good for you. I remember when a collector passed away. He would buy those things by the pile and when I saw them for sale in a shop for $100 each in the early 80's, there were many piles of sought after bolt action battle rifles. Enjoy.
 

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I've always wanted one, but decent ones that haven't been mucked up by crude "sporterizing" are pretty scarce. Not to mention .303 ammo - as a kid I remember that stuff was about the cheapest milsurp ammo around, now it's priced right up with the premium stuff. Looking forward to the range report!
 

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Congrats on the Enfield. Looking forward to your range report.
 

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Congrats! They shoot great, very accurate. I have a No. 5 Mk 1, Jungle Carbine and absolutely love it. About the same condition as yours except I had to clean the cosmoline off. Not so fun. First shot was standing unsupported and hit a two inch disk at 100 yards. I was just casually taking a shot to see where the sights were. Whomever was issued that rifle decades ago left it nice and sighted in for me.

You should be able to find the correct bayonet for it at a pretty good price. I am a little screwed on the bayonet as the jungle carbine takes a specific bayonet and only 251,000 carbines were made and the last bayonet I saw was $1200!!!!

Enjoy that old rifle!
 

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Nice score!

My first owned gun when I was sixteen in 1962 was a select-grade Lee-Enfield .303 purchased from the Sears Christmas catalog. The gun, some boxes of ammo, a cleaning kit, plus shipping came to around $39. The mailman dropped it off on our porch.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So it took a while but h finally got it to the range. Lots of fun to shoot, definitely gives you a nice whack in the shoulder. Been a long time since I’ve fired a gun like this, forgot how quickly it becomes uncomfortable with a brass butt plate giving you a thud every time you pull the trigger.

It was just a quick range trip to the indoor range, was there to shoot other stuff. Myself and a friend took a few shots each. I mainly just wanted to see if 1) it would explode the first round fired 2) what the recoil felt like and 3) if the sights were even remotely close.

The answers are 1) fires great 2) Plenty of recoil and 3) close enough to play around with at close range.

We only shot maybe 30 rounds of 174gr PPU ammo, a few shots rested on a bag at 50 yards and a few off hand at 25 yards. With just some casual shooting, it seemed to put all the shots pretty much right next to each other at 50 yards. If I were a better shooter, had better ammo, and most importantly were more stable (the range we were at has really shallow benches, like 14” deep, so you have zero support for the rear of the gun), I feel like I’d be pretty surprised at the accuracy.

I have about 30 pieces of brass, probably going to buy some other factory new brass, some dies, and try loading some really nice ammo. Would be lots of fun to take out to 100-200 yards at an outdoor range with some steel. Before I take it out and shoot 100 rounds in a single day, I might see if I can find a shirt with a bit extra padding or a limb saver that I could slip over the stock when I’m at the range... but shhh, that’s our secret.
 

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A fine rifle. Nice bit of history there too.
 

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That's a bit of history there, Chuck808, nice score. Congratulations!
 

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A weapons historian once thoughtfully said that the American military issued its troops a target rifle, the Germans issued a hunting rifle, and the British issued their troops a real battle rifle.

The technique that the British taught their riflemen involved using the thumb and forefinger of the right hand to manipulate the bolt, while the middle, "social" finger pressed the trigger at the end of each stroke.
The result was very quick, very accurate shooting.

During the 1914 "Christmas Truce," a German officer was walking the trench line with his British counterpart.
"Where are your machine guns?" the German asked.
"We haven't any," the Brit replied.
"But your troops lay down a field of fire, just as our machine gunners do," the German continued.
So the British officer explained the rifle technique that his men had been using.
The German officer expressed dismay.

In order to pass out of infantry training, a British soldier had to fire his iron-sighted, bolt-action rifle, freestyle, at the life-size silhouette of the head and shoulders of an "enemy soldier" that was 300 yards away.
In one minute, he was expected to make a minimum of 12 hits on the target. As you can see, a reload was necessary, during that "mad minute."
You might want to try it. It's called the "Lord Roberts Match."
 

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My dad had a Mk3 that had been sporterized. It was a good shooting rifle and I gave away the a partial box of Remington .303 about 2 months ago.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 
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