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Discussion Starter #1
Some dont like nightsights, others cant afford to drop the $ on them, some firearms nightsights just isn't an option.
I saw Glow in the dark nail polish (no I am NOT turning into a poof :tongue: ), in bright colors, it even has little sparkles. Even though Im not turning "festive" I am thinking pink.

Glow in the dark nail polish
 

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Just Wondering

Just wondering how long it holds a charge of light?
That might work but, you would probably need to give them a charge with your flashlight right before use. If things go "Bump In The Night" you might have more important things on your mind.

In low light though....any bright (even pink :smile: ) paint would help a shooter pick up that front sight.

The big advantage of the Tritium Night Sights is that they just glow brightly for at least 12 years on their own and never need to be exposed to bright light....since the gas is radioactive.

Actually, the best way to justify the cost of Night Sights is to buy fresh Tritium sights and figure that they are costing you less than 10 bucks a year.
 

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Actually they make a paint just for gun sights, all the hot colors plus glow in the dark in a 7 bottle kit. Unfortunately that stuff is only good for and hour or so after exposure to bright light. Have you thought of the user mountable fiber optic sights, put some on my over/under really helps out in lowlight, and many sporting goods stores carry them.
 

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I resisted gettting night sights for a long time. Didn't see the need. Now , I have a pistol that came with em, and am considering putting a set on my HK. Yes, they are expensive, but how much is your life worth to ya?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Its not only the cost that is a concern. Like I said, with some firearms its not an option. Snub nosed revolvers for example.
The glow feature might need to be charged to be effective, but Im thinking the sprinkles might pick up some ambient light. If the paint is charged, its a bonus.
 

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Experiment Greg - probably only way.

I have put dots of ''Bright Sights'' on my R9 and these are well visible in normal light but no luminocity at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Experiment Greg - probably only way.
True, and I plan on it.
Im going to use it w/h my Rossi snub nose, and my 1911 G.I.. I like the little sights on that gun(strange, ain't I? :biggrin: ), but its worthless in very low light. If this doesn't work on those tinny sights, it wont work on anything.

I do plan on getting nightsights put on my G19. After my 1911 is fully tested, and ready for carry.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
holding the light behind the gun so as to illuminate both the sights and whatever's downrange of the sights.
I don't know if that's a good idea?
I never tried holding the light forward of the piece.
I always thought that you should hold the flashlight in front of the handgun? What happens when the recoil knocks your flashlight hand? Would the 100+lumen's of light screw up the sight picture? Pulse, That wouldn't work with a Harries technique.

It just doesn't seem stable.
 

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I always thought that you should hold the flashlight in front of the handgun?
Well - not too far forward Greg :hand25: :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Im in the same "strapped for the holidays" situation your in.

I might order some next week, depending how my Jacksonville trip pans out. I definitely would get that before I go to a cashier, with pink nail polish! Ill get the nail polish from my female friends. They all must have a footlocker full of makeup per person.
 

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No, you do not hold the flashlight FORWARD of the gun. If you do that you cannot illuminate the sights. You must hold it BEHIND the handgun. There is no danger of shooting your hand or "knocking the light from the incredibly powerful recoil" of the handgun.

Hold your gun in your strong-side hand. Point it downrange.

Now take your flashlight in your support hand. Bend that mysterious joint called your elbow. Hold it well behind your firearm, over your chest. Thumb the tailcap switch. You are now illuminating both the sights of your handgun and anything downrange of your handgun, though there will be a shadow in the shape of your pistol in the middle of everything.

Presto! You're now safely managing low-light firing.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Now take your flashlight in your support hand. Bend that mysterious joint called your elbow. Hold it well behind your firearm, over your chest. Thumb the tailcap switch. You are now illuminating both the sights of your handgun and anything downrange of your handgun, though there will be a shadow in the shape of your pistol in the middle of everything.
O.K. ... I see what your trying to explain.

It still seems kinda goofy.
Maybe saying having the light forward of the gun, was wrong of me (beer&keyboards don't mix!!), my mistake.
I should have said parallel with handgun. That is just more comfortable, and seems more stable. I shoot with my right hand, but I'm left eye dominate. I have to move my head to the right, to get a proper sight picture. Instead of having more freedom to move my shooting hand, and support hand to the right. If I did your funky Harries technique.

P.S. If you respond, please don't post a huge pic of yourself demonstrating this.
Thanks.
 

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The green paint lasts for about 8-10 hrs......you can usually find it on E Bay....in the gun accys sections
 

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It's certainly not the technique I prefer, but for a gun that has no night sights it's definitely a viable technique. It certainly is less stable than any technique that involves having the light parallel to the gun in some way. Depending on the light you're using, this may not illuminate the sights sufficiently -- especially if the gun with which you find yourself has less than ideal sights in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
P.S. If you respond, please don't post a huge pic of yourself demonstrating this.
OMG...... ya just cant resist can you?:rolleyes: Whats the deal?

Now Im going to have nightmares tonight.

Euc,
I have been using white-out on the front post. Its just that white-out doesn't show in low light w/h my 1911.

I never tried using a real Harris technique since I got my surefire. My range will let me get away with a lot, but shooting at night is crossing the line. Ill try it with dry fire in my apt. I bet it will work real well w/h my .38, duno bout the 1911? Ill give it a try after my GF goes to bed. She is new to guns.
 
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