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Heres an oddball question: Why is it that when cleaning a pistol you should run the bore brush from the breach end but with a revolver you send it through the muzzle end?
 

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because on a revolver you don't have a choice. Given a choice, always run it through the breach to keep from damaging the crown.
 

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Also as with practicing good safety, I suggest wearing protective safety glasses. This really makes a great deal of difference. You don't want to inadvertantly catch chemical cleaning sprays on you or flying parts.

For example one day, I was reassembling a gun, when the spring came flying off the slide and flew at Mach .70. In case it does make contact with you towards the eyes, wearing safety glasses will protect you!
 

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Use a bore snake and you can clean a revolver's bore from the forcing cone to the muzzle. If you're using a rod, then obviously you can't.
 

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There is a debate.... I hear it alot.... that using a rod from the muzzle can damage the crown of the barrel and will affect the accuracy of the gun. It's applicable to any gun, but I've heard it more related to rifles. However, how much it affects accuracy is debatable.... varying opinions out there. Where I hear it most is between very serious target competition type shooters, vs normal non-competition shooters. Personally, I've done it both ways and I've never found any difference in accuracy between the two guns.

Then the other, as mentioned, is that going from the breach end.... is safety... you can't put it in there if there's a bullet in the way.
 

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Gun Cleaning??

I only clean my Glocks and then go to the range to insure that they will go BANG with extra ammo. Doing it in the reverse manner insures that you have cleaned it, but you don't know if it will go BANG!
 

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I only clean my Glocks and then go to the range to insure that they will go BANG with extra ammo. Doing it in the reverse manner insures that you have cleaned it, but you don't know if it will go BANG!
I love it! I often get asked why my carry gun has obviously not been cleaned since the last time I went to the range for just that reason. Clean, range, carry. No one seems to get what I am saying when I explain it though.
 

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A solid brass cleaning rod is less likely to damage the crown. It's softer than the gun's steel, just keep the grit off of it.
 

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Its not the brass or aluminum that wears out the crown, as both are softer than the steel.

Its the embedded carbon and grit in it that is very abrasive. After a period of time it does have an effect. Many old military rifles suffer from this. Back in the day, a common fix was to counter bore the muzzle about an inch deep to restore the rifling that was worn out from cleaning.
 

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I've also heard the argument by some 'experts', that people when they clean a gun do more damage to a good barrel and shouldn't clean a gun that much.... as they will do more damage than if they just left it alone. LOL.
 

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I only clean my Glocks and then go to the range to insure that they will go BANG with extra ammo. Doing it in the reverse manner insures that you have cleaned it, but you don't know if it will go BANG!
The way I test to see if it will go bang after cleaning is to stick a wood pencil with a fresh eraser down the barrel (after ensuring that it is unloaded of course) and pulling the trigger. The firing pin will hit the eraser causing the pencil to jump.

Taught this trick by my firearms instructor at my police academy.

I clean my firearms after every use.
 
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