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I currently have a Rhino Metals 39 gun safe bolted to the floor in my garage, but after reading a few things about rusting guns I’m getting scared! I have a golden rod in there now and I check it often to make sure it’s hot. My garage is attached to the house, but it still gets pretty cold in the winter time and hot in the summer. It’s a newer house, so the garage is sealed pretty well………anyone have problems with rust in a situation like mine? I’d like to move it into the house, but the lady doesn’t want it in the bedroom and I’m not too excited about moving 1000+lbs of metal….
 

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Moisture in the air is what is going to cause the majority of your rust problems, so if you keep it dry, and use a dehumidifier, it should keep most of the rust away.

However, especially if you have firearms with nice wood, I would keep them in a place more temperature controlled. JMO.
 

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Well, having it bolted to the foundation doesn't mean that the metal of the safe must ride right on the foundation itself, unprotected.

One method: climate control, of both the air and the floor. Some folks have floors with built-in heating. That would certainly cut almost all the temperature change from infecting the safe's structure.

You could also build your own heated "floor" out of a section of thick, high-grade marine plywood and the appropriate "heating" coils snaked through its guts.

Most folks, though, are going to simply have a cement slab, which will go through the full swings in temperature that the outdoors does.

You might consider using a barrier that can help block much of the temperature swing transmitting the result directly to the steel of the safe. For example, imagine sealing that 4x4' section of concrete, using a 1" sheet of high-quality, marine plywood that's been epoxied "shut," an then topped with a couple sheets of high-grade moisture barrier (plastic) that's used in construction. Placing the safe on this and then bolting it to the foundation can create a decent buffer between the harsh concrete and resulting temperature changes. Won't stop it, but it'll buffer the worst of it from the metal of the safe. If you've got a serious temperature problem, you could even make your own heated plywood "floor" for the safe, much like folks install in homes. Though, I couldn't vouch for the result, given usage in a room without other climate control.

You could acquire one or two of the "thinner" safes (front to back), for storage in closets. Of course, that'll cut your closet space by quite a bit. Still, that'll bring the units inside to a space that has better temp controls. If you've got a big room in the house, you could even build in a 3ft deep false wall, for that extra "closet" space.

What I do is predicated on the relatively small temperature swings I have to contend with. It gets cold, here, sure. But, it won't swing from 25*F at night to 80*F during the day, then back again. Very rarely. And, in my home, the concrete is not changing temps very quickly, given the nature of the build. Generally, it stays within a fairly tight temperature range, which cuts down on the moisture production pretty well. I've not noticed any condensation on the outside or inside. I've got a long goldenrod @ 200cuft capacity, a can of silicon gel pellets @ 50cuft capacity, and one of the EVA units @ 30cuft capacity. I recharge the can and the EVA monthly, and they needed it. So, yes, the temp swings are boosting the capture of moisture, but I also am aggressive to protect that ~18cuft interior space with (claimed) 250+ cu.ft. moisture-capturing capacity from the goldenrod + can + EVA. Still, it requires frequent recharging.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think I will put it on the marine plywood as you suggested for sure. I might even consider an insulated wooden enclosure all around it. I have sold most of my wooden stocked guns and pretty much all I have now is synthetic. My Goldenrod is good for 200 cubic feet, and I think I will get some silica packs and one of those rechargeable dehumidifiers as well. Thanks for the great ideas and keep them coming!
 

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The wooden enclosure will do double duty by also shielding it from prying eyes if the garage door happens to be open.
 

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Great suggestions ccw9mm, I too have my safe in a detached garage sitting on four 2X4s and have a heater and two canisters of Sta-Dri inside. Even with the humidity we have here I have had no problems with rust.
 

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I just ordered a can of silica from Cabelas today.

I don't have a humidity problem, but I figure it won't hurt.
 

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My safes are in an A/C controlled room...no problems.:22a:
 

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My safe is in the man cave shop. It is 30 x 70 and made of metal with a concrete floor. Not insulated and not heated. I have two dehumidifiers and a silica can. As long as I don't have rust problems I prefer it that way because I cut back on scope fogging problems. I did put plastice down before pouring the concrete which helps keep moisture from wicking through the concrete.
 

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My safe is in the basement, sitting on a sheet of 3/4" plywood and is bolted into the concrete floor and the wall behind the safe. I have a damp chaser plugged in and a room dehumidifier in the basement set for 45 percent.

There's enough leakage in the ductwork to keep the temp no lower than the mid 50s during the dead of winter.

No rust, no mildew, no problems.
 

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I use to have my safes out in the garage in our old house, but with the humidity in SC I put them in a closet on the second floor when we moved a few years back. I would to do like my brother did, he built a house and built a conditioned room at the back of his garage for his firearms.
 

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Based on these replies, I think the OP has little to worry about if he takes reasonable precautions. Especially given that he is in Idaho where the humidity is very low.

Also, be sure to wipe your firearms down every after each use and every few months with a good CLP such as Weaponshield.
 

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The extreme temperature swings would be of major concern to me no matter what form of de-humidifier I was using. Subtle changes are not so much of a worry, but maintenance does play an important role such as how much oil to leave in a bore and things like that. When you know the conditions, you can adapt to them and have little concern. Keeping your safe where it is just means a little more time in maintenance. If your safe is well insulated....treat it like a refrigerator! Don't open the door frequently, or take the toys out to play. That's when the difference in temperatures will take it's toll. Bring one of your firearms in the house after the cold storage pretty much demands wiping it down immediately when it sweats out, then apply preserves when it goes back. Rust, metals, and the environment are a science of their own. Use your common sense, and you'll never see rust on your firearms. With today's exterior finishes, the most important thing is the bores. That's where you have naked metal, and the chrome lined bores won't demand as much care.
 

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I think that most people don't know what a Golden Rod is. You really shouldn't have to worry, the way the goldenrod works is by warming the interior of the safe. I would get a thermometer that has 115 to 150 on it, if the one goldenrod won't keep your safe at about 125, just add a second one.
 

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I think that most people don't know what a Golden Rod is. You really shouldn't have to worry, the way the goldenrod works is by warming the interior of the safe. I would get a thermometer that has 115 to 150 on it, if the one goldenrod won't keep your safe at about 125, just add a second one.
Why 125 degrees?

I've had my safe 25 years and it's never been that hot in the safe. Of course, until now, it's always been in an air conditioned environment. No A/C in my basement in my retirement home, but a constant humidity of 45-50 percent and a basement temp of 50 (in winter) to 70 (in the summer). There's no rust or condensation on anything, inside the safe or out.
 

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Sorry Dude,
I didn't invent the Goldenrod, nor do I collect residuals for it's advertisment. I simply use them and I have currently 5 in operation. All are mounted in fire proof safes, because many times the materials used to fireproof a safe will give off excess moisture which causes rusty guns. Humidity of course causes the same rusty situation. The goldenrod simply uses a high enough temperature to "chase away" humidity. For the "cheap ********" goldenrod also makes an economy version.
 

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Sorry Dude,
I didn't invent the Goldenrod, nor do I collect residuals for it's advertisment. I simply use them and I have currently 5 in operation. All are mounted in fire proof safes, because many times the materials used to fireproof a safe will give off excess moisture which causes rusty guns. Humidity of course causes the same rusty situation. The goldenrod simply uses a high enough temperature to "chase away" humidity. For the "cheap ********" goldenrod also makes an economy version.
Was this directed to me? If so, I don't need an explanation of the GoldenRod, which is simply one brand name for what we called for years, a "damp chaser". They started out in pianos and organs way back in the 50s and then were "discovered" by gun owners. As they say, the rest is history. BTW, I never alluded to any relationship between you and the Goldenrod. I have no idea where you got the idea that I did.

My question was about the 125-degree internal safe temp you mentioned. I've never heard that recommended before and question the need for firearms to be kept in that hot an environment, especially if the safe is in a climate-controlled environment, such as the typical air conditioned house. FWIW, at one point, my guns were store outside the safe, in an attic that was neither heated in winter nor air conditioned in summer. They were there in their hard cases for over a year and there was not a spot of rust or anything else on any of them.

It's my experience that if the humidity is below 50 percent, and the guns are properly cared for in the first place, rust and corrosion are a minimal problem, if at all.
 

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My bad, it won't make the whole safe that warm, just the immediate area where it is mounted, as you say it merely "chases out moisture"
I also put a humidity detector card in at the top of the safe.It has several circles on the card that indicate by color the level of humidity.
 
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