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How many of you have kids at home old enough to be curious? I know many of you have don't will have your gun close to you at all times while home, even while sleeping. What do those of you with kids do?

I have one 16yr old & one 6 yr old.

I am looking for a new gun for carry and have been reading a lot of the discussions about a manual safety vs. no manual safety. Do you think with kids around it is important to have a manual safety on top of other safety measures taken. I realize a kid (especially the older one) can easily turn the safety. But I am thinking that if for some reason he ever got hold of it without a lock on it and he was just holding it the way a kids may, that it is one more safety measure to prevent an accident.

Opinions please.

David
 

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Keep you're gun locked up when no on you.

I believe it is important to start talking gun safety as soon as a kid is old enough to understand. "Do NOT touch daddy's gun!"
 

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When my wife and I got married and started a family, all my guns ( that wheren't on me) got locked in the safe. SAFTY always comes first.
 

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Let them watch the Eddie Eagle video.

I can only tell you what I have done. My kids 10,8,2 all understand that I have firearms in the house. If they want to see Daddy guns all they have to ask. Will be happy to unload them and let them play with them AFTER I show them that the guns are unloaded. Just like any other new toy it gets old real fast. Then It just sits there unused. Still enforcing proper gun handling. Finger off the trigger. Knowing what is behind the wall, Understanding once you pull the trigger no turning back the bullet. I have left the guns unloaded easily with in their reach. So far they have not touched the gun. This is no means the end all solution but it works for me. I am not worried about my kids going to a friends house and them finding a gun at the friends house.
 

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I'd say the safest place for your firearm is on your person. If it isn't on your person, it should be in a safe.

-john
 

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I have a 2 year old and a 9 month old, but when ever a gun is not on my person then it is locked up in a safe.
 

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All the comments on keeping it locked up if not on your person are right on! :wink:
But I would also suggest on teaching your kids all about guns and taking the curiosity away. The kids who are "accidentally" injured or killed every year are from guns that aren't locked up and parents who've never taken the time to completely educate their kids about guns.

My daughter is now 10 years old and has had her own guns since she was 6 or 7. She now has 4 guns of her own and is more safe handling guns than many adults I know. She's also fully aware of other people's handling skills while she's around, and she'll let you know if you're being unsafe at any point!
She also knows that if she's ever at another person's house and a gun makes an appearance without a responsible adult present....It's time to leave!

The only safety you should ever trust is the one between your ears. ;) Not the mechanical ones on the guns themselves.
 

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My son is only 13 months old, so he's still too young. Obviously we don't keep our firearms ANYWHERE were he could get into in case he is strong enough to pull the trigger. My girlfriend has a 4 year old nephew who visits at least once or twice a week, so we have to keep it out of his reach as well.

I'd look into getting a gun safe, and if you're worried about having to access it in an emergency, look at fingerprint locks or ones that require buttons. Keys are good for back up, but fumbling with keys is a recipe for disaster in case of an emergency.
 

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Let them watch the Eddie Eagle video.

I can only tell you what I have done. My kids 10,8,2 all understand that I have firearms in the house. If they want to see Daddy guns all they have to ask. Will be happy to unload them and let them play with them AFTER I show them that the guns are unloaded. Just like any other new toy it gets old real fast. Then It just sits there unused. Still enforcing proper gun handling. Finger off the trigger. Knowing what is behind the wall, Understanding once you pull the trigger no turning back the bullet. I have left the guns unloaded easily with in their reach. So far they have not touched the gun. This is no means the end all solution but it works for me. I am not worried about my kids going to a friends house and them finding a gun at the friends house.
I agree with this. My instructor firmly believes in this principle and he has 2 grown children, both in the military now and also both qualified firearms instructors in their own right that prove this can be a legitimate way to raise children around guns. Especially your 16 year old. Don't make it tabboo. Be open and honest and if your kids are interested let them go to the range with you and learn proper saftey and techniques. Some of the best range days I've ever had have been with my dad and I know he feels the same.
 

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Teach your kids gun safety if they are old enough to understand. But I agree with the others. If it's not on you, it should be in a safe. I put mine in a GunVault. I have a 2 and 4 year old and no matter what you tell them, they're too young to understand. I can't see any reason why you would leave a loaded weapon laying around when you can access a small safe in seconds.
 

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While I agree with the other posters who have said get a safe/keep it locked up when not on your person, and above all teach kids gun safety, it is a shame that our society has come to this. I grew up in an age when most households had guns, fathers taught their children gun safety at a very early age, and not only were they taught not to touch a gun lying around, they were taught not to touch other peoples property--period! People did not have gun safes at home! And gun "accidents" were extremely rare! I think that our society really began to decline with the teachings of that great child expert Dr. Spock (heavy sarcasm).:hand1: His permissive ideas led to undiciplined generations of brats who were never taught how to act properly.:rant: Spare the rod and spoil the child. His "philosophy" of child rearing has had a profound impact on how we must live our lives today.:aargh4:
 

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Safe or no safe, a curious 16 year old will find a way to get in and take care of that curiosity that's building up inside him.

I have two boys at home, one of which is old enough to be curious, but he isn't, and here's why:

All of my guns are immediately accessible to him anytime I'm home, all he has to do is ask. Because of the importance of this topic, I do not hesitate on this matter. He is usually able to handle an unloaded weapon within 30 seconds of asking for it.

Now for the better part ... he is well versed in the concept of firearms safety. He's still too small and doesn't have enough strength to pull back a slide and do a visual chamber inspection (especially on my Fusion with its 24lb recoil spring), but he knows NEVER to point a gun at anyone, only the floor - and he knows never to touch the trigger. Next year he'll getting he'll be getting his first rifle.

I'm not in denial either. I know that at some point he'll be in high-school, his buddies will know he's got guns in the house, they'll want to see his and my cool toys, and my son will have some covert way of getting into my safe. But more importantly, I know that this gun handling skills at that point will be top-notch. I know that every weapon will be stripped of it's magazine, slides will be locked back, chambers inspected, and the gun presented muzzle down before any of the other kids gets their hands on them.
 

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When I lived at home with young kids, I locked up all but the one I was carrying. When I got home, I locked the one I carry in my briefcase.

When people visit us now with kids, I lock up all the guns except for the one on me. When I go to bed at night I lay it on the nightstand next to me, and I lock the bedroom door.

Each child comes to the age of responsibility differently. And only you as a parent are capable of judging how old that is.
 

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I'd look into getting a gun safe, and if you're worried about having to access it in an emergency, look at fingerprint locks or ones that require buttons. Keys are good for back up, but fumbling with keys is a recipe for disaster in case of an emergency.
Just remember that you can keep your firearm on your person until it is time to sleep, which reduces the time you have to worry about securing it, as well as speeds the accessibility in case of an emergency.

-john
 

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Also, don't forget local laws. http://www.lcav.org/content/child_access_prevention.pdf

Child Access Prevention

Under Texas Penal Code Annotated § 46.13, if a child under 17 years of age gains access to a readily dischargeable firearm (i.e., loaded with ammunition, whether or not a round is in the chamber), a person is criminally liable if he or she, “with criminal negligence:”

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Failed to secure the firearm (i.e., to take steps a reasonable person would take to prevent the access to a readily dischargeable firearm by a child, including but not limited to placing a firearm in a locked container or temporarily rendering the firearm inoperable by a trigger lock or other means); or
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Left the firearm in a place to which the person knew or should have known the child would gain access.

Section 46.13(c) provides an affirmative defense to prosecution for a violation of section 46.13 if the child's access to the firearm:

Was supervised by a person older than age 18 and was for hunting, sporting, or other lawful purposes;

Consisted of lawful defense by the child of people or property;

Was gained by entering property in violation of this code; or

Occurred during a time when the actor was engaged in an agricultural enterprise.

An offense under section 46.13 is a Class C misdemeanor (up to a $500 fine), unless the child discharges the firearm and causes death or serious bodily injury to himself or another person, in which case the offense rises to a Class A misdemeanor (up to 1 year imprisonment and/or a $4,000 fine). Section 46.13(d), (e).

If the negligent person is a member of the family of the child who discharged the firearm, and the child was killed or seriously injured, an arrest cannot be made until seven days after the offense was committed. Section 46.13(f).

Finally, under section 46.13(g), a firearms dealer must post in a “conspicuous position” on the premises where he or she conducts business a sign that contains the following warning in block letters not less than one inch in height:

IT IS UNLAWFUL TO STORE, TRANSPORT, OR ABANDON AN UNSECURED FIREARM IN A PLACE WHERE CHILDREN ARE LIKELY TO BE AND CAN OBTAIN ACCESS TO THE FIREARM.

State administrative regulations govern the storage of firearms in:

Texas youth camps (25 Tex. Admin. Code § 265.17(d));

Child-placing agencies (40 Tex. Admin. Code § 749.2961);

Child-care centers (40 Tex. Admin. Code § 746.3707(c), (d)); and

Child-care homes (40 Tex. Admin. Code § 747.3505).
 

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I have three boys; 11, 4 and 2 and I don't leave anything to chance when it comes to their curiosity or capacity. All my guns stay unloaded and are kept in a gun safe, with the exception of my CC pistol, which is a Springfield XD SC. When I started carrying again, I purchased one of these to keep my carry pistol in when it is not on my person.

Amazon.com: HOMAK HS10036684 10-by-5-1/2-by-7-1/2-Inch Electronic Access Pistol Boby: Home Improvement

My XD doesn't have any manual (active) safety mechanisms and a round is always in the chamber, but since it is either tucked inside my waistband or locked in the box, I don't worry about any of the kids getting to it and getting hurt.
 

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If the firearm is not on your person, then lock it up. There are MANY, inexpensive 'lock-boxes' on the market to 'house' your sidearm when not being worn and still allowing quick access.

Education is still the best 'weapon' WRT kids.....regardless of a gun's safety.

I've got three of 'em, 16, 15, and 6. The older two know my guns and know not to touch if I'm not the supervisor. The 6 YO will be eased inot and taught at his AND daddy's speed. I'll know when he's ready......You'll know when your's is ready as well. One step at a time.
 

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My kids are older now, but I started training them in gun safety at about 5 years of age each.
I would take em out back (where safe) and demonstrate the destructive power by shooting something like a milk jug full of water with a .22. (Makes a big impression.)
Then I'd explain how that is a relatively low power gun and load up something with a big kick and let 'em shoot it, ONCE.
With big eyes and rubbing shoulder, they never forget.
Once that is settled, the Edie Eagle video is loaded and watched till the tape breaks.

Now days, as they get to be about 16, I show them where the gun safe keys are, in case while I am out, they need to avail themselves of tools to use in self defense, if an intruder should make the fatal mistake of breaking in.

Otherwise, my gun, is on my hip (or at my side while I sleep) when in the house.

For those of you with little ones, keep it under your control, train 'em up in the best way you see fit till they are old enough to handle themselves.
 

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I agree with most of the answers so I won't repeat them. But one thing I haven't seen mentioned is a warning that kids change over time: you can think you have them trained (e.g. not to touch guns) at an early age but, particularly during adolescence, sometimes they will spontaneously start acting against their early learning.
 
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