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Went to the gun shop to pick up my new AR-15. :)banana: Ya, thread coming.) While I was there, I also wanted to check out a few things. One was an IWB holster for my LCP.

He showed me a holster and let me try it on. He then handed me an LCP so I could test it out. I am standing directly across the counter from him. He takes the gun, releases the magazine, pulls back the slide and shows me the chamber is empty. He then immediately hands me the firearm.

At this point, do you feel compelled to check the gun again to verify it is not loaded or was that sufficient?
 

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If you could clearly see the chamber was empty, probably. Me I'm just one to double check, even when I unload one of my own guns I always check twice.
 

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I'm new to firearms. I have my CPL, but I am still researching my short list. I'm planning to make a final decision in late October.

When I go to a store, they do the same thing and without fail, I will pull back the slide and drop the magazine to clear the firearm myself. I figure I'm just developing good habits. I even had a store employee compliment me on the fact that I cleared the firearm for myself.

Rule #1, a gun is always loaded, even if it was just checked. It can never hurt to error on the side of safety.
 

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At this point, do you feel compelled to check the gun again to verify it is not loaded or was that sufficient?
It's usually sufficient for me if I can clearly see the empty chamber and the magazine is not reinserted.
 

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If you could clearly see the chamber was empty, probably. Me I'm just one to double check, even when I unload one of my own guns I always check twice.
+1 i always check it, doesnt matter if someone else does or not..... for me i WILL always check.
 

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IMHO, I'm responsible for my actions. That means that I personally inspect every weapon that I handle. It costs nothing and shouldn't offend anyone. Somewhere along the line I started putting my finger in the breach to check for the round (in addition to visual inspection). That trick saved my bacon once when I was coming off a night patrol and my eyes just weren't working.

What I was expecting you to say was that the dealer pointed the gun right at you. I can't tell you how many times a licensed dealer has done that to me.

Cheers.
 

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Went to the gun shop to pick up my new AR-15. :)banana: Ya, thread coming.) While I was there, I also wanted to check out a few things. One was an IWB holster for my LCP.

He showed me a holster and let me try it on. He then handed me an LCP so I could test it out. I am standing directly across the counter from him. He takes the gun, releases the magazine, pulls back the slide and shows me the chamber is empty. He then immediately hands me the firearm.

At this point, do you feel compelled to check the gun again to verify it is not loaded or was that sufficient?
Yes, he would have if it was the other way around.
 

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When I worked at a gun store we always handed the weapon over with the slide stop engaged. Granted that the weapon had one, which the LCP does not.

It always a good idea to check, especially before dry firing. We had a guy come in looking for a holster for his Hi-power, talking to our manager gun in hand. With his arms crossed he had the weapon pointed at my coworkers chest. Now this is normally not cause for alarm since we get unloaded weapons pointed at us all hours of the day (another can of worms I'll get into later). Long story short, for whatever reason he decided to rack the slide and a live round hopped out. Needless to say, we weren't amused.
 

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What I was expecting you to say was that the dealer pointed the gun right at you. I can't tell you how many times a licensed dealer has done that to me.
This guy was one of the best I have seen. VERY conscientious and competent clerk.
 

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Always check it 3 times, just to make sure I didn't miss anything the first 2 times.
 

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+1 to checking it yourself.

Since my the Marine Corps issued me my first weapon, it has been ingrained (some would said beaten) into me that one ALWAYS checks a weapons when they pick it up, or it is handed to them.

I have had one dealer take issue with me clearing it myself after he did, saying it "was bad for the gun" to be handled that much when it was unnecessary. Needless to say I don't shop there now.

I have had many dealers give me knowing smile when I did it - I believe it lets someone know that you are serious about gun safety and how to handle a gun.

If it makes them feel otherwise, you might not want them to be handling guns near you.
 

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Always recheck, unless it's open when I get it. It's my money on the line if it's somehow loaded. It's a good paranoia to have.
 

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Answer your question with a question.

Which would make you feel more stupid, double checking a firearm just handed to your or having an ND with a gun you THOUGHT was empty?

Is it worth the extra 5 seconds?
 

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I would prefer them to hand it to me with the slide locked. But if I could visually see the chamber when he checked it, usually that's good for me.

More often than not, I'll give it rack and visual check again if handed to me with a closed action. It doesn't take but a moment to perform a check and it keeps your good habits ingrained.

Do it the same way every time and you don't have any surprise Booms!
 

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The one thing I am anally retentive about is checking the condition of a firearm being handed to me.

That extra time to check could be what prevents me from having an unexpected loud occurance.

Biker
 

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As infrequently as I do buy guns I make sure to check to ensure that the weapon is unloaded. I return it to the person who handed it to me in the same condition.

In the case of a revolver, the cylinder is open. If a semi-auto, the slide is locked back & open after checking for a round in the chamber. The one rule of thumb I always follow is that I ALWAYS assume the handgun is loaded until I verify it is unloaded.

You cannot be too safe when it comes to firearm safety.

Mod's, pardon the slight misdirection of this thread. My younger brother has agreed to accept my firearms in the event of my very untimely demise. I have to sit down with him in the next few weeks and explain how each of my handguns/rifles function. The most important issue I'll be covering with him is firearm safety. He has to know how to verify the status of my firearms prior to handling them under the circumstances.

He's a beginner/novice when it comes to firearms safety so I'll have to "spoon feed" him how to safely handle my guns. I don't want him to have a terrible accident.
 

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I always check when handed a firearm. They are all loaded until I have personally checked and verified they are unloaded.
 

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Years ago I was handed a used .45, by a young man behind the counter at a Pawn shop where I used to buy a lot of guns. It was pretty worn but was priced to sell and it was cheap.

He did a fair job of it, he turned away,racked the slide back and removed the empty magazine. He then handed it to me.

Without even thinking, I looked into the chamber and lo and behold, there was a live round in it. I held the gun down and re racked the slide to eject it and there it stayed.

Come to find out, that gun had been checked several times by various individuals and NONE of them noticed the live round. The extractor had been damaged to the point that it would not extract the round.

I brought it to his attention and he freaked out. The owner of the shop's face turned pale as he realized what could have happened. He took the gun and put it in the back of the shop where he fixed guns and extracted that live round and eventually replaced the extractor.

It was miraculous that someone didn't pull the trigger to see how it felt. Had that happened, there is no telling what could have happened.

I learned right then and there, I don't care if a gun has been checked a hundred times, I WILL check it myself.

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Another time, I was at a gun show in at the Little Rock Fairgrounds and a dealer shot off a Raven .22. The bullet went through a table, bounced off of the concrete and stuck somewhere up in the roof. After that you could have heard a pin drop. There was several thousand people in attendance, it was standing room only. That was another miracle.

The thing was, the gun had been checked by security and had the customary zip tie run through the open slide. The dealer bought the gun, cut the zip tie off, dropped the slide and the slide motion fired the .22 round. That round was in the chamber the whole time and no one noticed it, not even the dealer.

A gun is a machine and that machine ,like any other machine, is prone to mechanical failure. Sometimes it results in a discharge. More often, that machine performs exactly as it is supposed to and bad things happen because the person operating it lacked the skills to do so.

You have got to be smarter than the machine and check the thing every time someone hands one to you. Its the only way to be safe, there is no other way.You cant assume that it is safe and you cant trust anyone else to do it for you.

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Most of us remember the ATF agent that told the class that he was the only one "professional enough" to carry a gun and a minute later he shot himself in the leg with the Glock .40 in front of a class room full of kids.

What most people missed was the fact that he showed the gun to a teacher and asked him to confirm it was clear. The teacher said that it was.

The agent did not know if that teacher knew how to check for a live round, he just ASSUMED that he did and he took him at his word. That was his first mistake. His second mistake was believing it. His third mistake was a negligent discharge and he was lucky that he only shot himself and not some other.

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The bottom line is this...

It is YOUR responsibility to always check for a loaded gun, no one else's. If you bust a round off and bad things take place, YOU will be the one sued, not the person that handed it to you. If someone dies, YOU will be the one charged, and no one or nothing else will matter.
 

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I always check the chamber, no matter what! I guess I do this because as a kid starting out with firearms that was drilled in my head time after time.

I don't think a gun shop employee will be offended by this action, at least I have not notice any!
 

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As a matter of firearms safety discipline I always check. Even if I just watched him do it, I check it just because that is what I do. No one thinks worse of you for strictly following safety rules, and you'll live with the shame and consequences if something were to happen because you failed to check.
 
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