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Discussion Starter #1
I was trying a G36 at the range last week. One thing that caught my attention was just how hot it got so quickly. I fired one box of ammo, loading six, shooting six, back and forth, and not shooting fast. The thing was pretty darn hot already. I have a 19 now (my first and only pistol) and have shot way more without it getting anywhere near so hot. My newbie question is, is this something to be concerned about? I'm more interested in the 30S , but the range doesn't have one to try, but I understand is virtually the same slide assembly. I tried the 30, shot two boxes and it was barely lukewarm. Loved it, but the slimmer size of the 30s appeals to me if you guys tell me that it's not an issue. Thanks.
 

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I have no idea why it got hot. I have both: 36 and 30S. One caveat though, I live in a place where EVERYTHING gets hot when it is outside. :icon_neutral:

All that aside, repeated firing can cause any gun to become hot. There are other factors, such as powder lot that can cause it too. I wouldn't worry about it, unless it doesn't cool down when you stop shooting. :gah:

Welcome to DC by the way.
 

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The things that I can think of that would govern the rate of temperature increase of the slide would be:

1. the energy input
a) number of rounds fired
b) how quickly they were fired
c) energy level of cartridges being fired (standard, +p, etc)

2. how effectively the heat is conducted into the slide at the barrel-to-slide surfaces and at the cartridge-to-slide face. This will depend on:
a) amount of contact area between slide/barrel and cartridge/slide
b) thermal resistance between slide/barrel and cartridge/slide

3. thermal mass (weight) of the slide
4. the specific heat (heat-holding capability) and thermal conductivity of the slide material
5. how effectively the heat convects from the slide to the air
6. lubrication

You say you've fired the same or more rounds through your G19, so you could probably eliminate #1a and #1b. And assuming the G19, G30 and G36 slides are made out of the same material and are about the same weight, you should be able to eliminate #3 and #4. If the ambient temperature and wind velocity was the same when you were shooting the G19 as it was when you were shooting the G36, you should be able to eliminate #5.
As far as #2 goes, the measurable contact area between barrel/slide should be identical between the G19 and G36, so #2a can be eliminated. But the thermal resistance (#2b) between the slide/barrel and/or cartridge/slide could be different. If you could look at the part surfaces under a powerful microscope, it would look like the Grand Canyon. Lots of peaks and valleys. When you put the parts together, you'll get a lot of microscopic voids that are filled with air and are therefore poor conductors of heat. But if the surfaces are made smoother, or if you increase contact pressure by pushing them together, they will become better conductors of heat. So if the G36 parts have smoother surface finishes, or the G36 has a stronger recoil spring that increases the contact pressure between the barrel/slide or the cartridge/slide, or the machining tolerances just cause a tighter slide-to-barrel lockup, I think you could conduct heat into the slide more quickly.

So, my money would be on #1c (higher cartridge energy), or #2b (lower thermal resistance between slide/barrel or cartridge/slide), or #6 (lubrication) or a combination of all three. If you could get the same gun and run a few tests, you could probably eliminate further.

Surface finishes typically get smoother with use, so if you were shooting a rental gun that had tens of thousands of rounds through it and hadn't been cleaned or lubricated in a while, I could see the slide heating up faster than a new gun out of the box.
 

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Never shove a hot slide into an IWB holster of any type, or in a molded kydex holster. Beyond that, smoke 'em if you've got 'em.
 

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I've burned the midriff sliding the g17 slide back into a holster. If you've got the gun that, it's a god thing. It means you're sending lead downrange in sufficient quantities.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Or you were shooting some smokers. Was this Underwood/Corbon/Buffalo Bore-type stuff?
No, just blazer brass 230gr FMJ. I guess I'm just trying to decide if the extra heating up is an acceptable trade off for the size and weight reduction you get over a G30.
 

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Block, if the caliber ends in mm it has a thicker barrel, if it ends in cal it has a thinner barrel.
 
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I don't know how it worked out, but if you take a look at Glocks you will see what I am talking about. Glock 19, 9mm, Glock 23,
40 cal built on the same platform as the 9mm, so you end up with a thicker barrel. Same thing when you compare the 10mm to the 45 cal. Metric has a thicker barrel.
 
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I don't know how it worked out, but if you take a look at Glocks you will see what I am talking about. Glock 19, 9mm, Glock 23,
40 cal built on the same platform as the 9mm, so you end up with a thicker barrel. Same thing when you compare the 10mm to the 45 cal. Metric has a thicker barrel.
I wasn't sure what you were talking about. Now I see.
 

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I don't know how it worked out, but if you take a look at Glocks you will see what I am talking about. Glock 19, 9mm, Glock 23,
40 cal built on the same platform as the 9mm, so you end up with a thicker barrel. Same thing when you compare the 10mm to the 45 cal. Metric has a thicker barrel.
Good point sir.
 

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Maybe Blazer Brass .45 ammo is loaded with Titegroup? Some of those fast powders really heat a gun up fast.
 
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