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Discussion Starter #1
I am endlessly grabbing a gun, scope, laser, knife, computer, etc. And not having the right size tool. Most kits I see don't have all nor even many of the smaller sizes.

There has to be a kit out there that has nearly all the smaller sizes up to mediumish large (I don't work on my cars for instance, bicycles would be largest) bits. Hex Allen, torx, metric, etc that is of good quality and nice ratchet would be nice. Any suggestions????

Or even a kit for the torx, for regular screws, etc.
 

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Google will give you lots of sites with combo packages.

What you DON'T want to work on your guns and scope mounting with are plain, straight-blade screwdrivers.n They can, and usually do, deform gun screws.

You want hollow-ground screwdrivers specifically made for gun screws. A good, inexpensive set is the Lyman set:

Lyman Products Your Primary Source for Reloading Equipment

A better set is:

Lyman Products Your Primary Source for Reloading Equipment

Other good sets:

Cabela's -- Grace USA Gun Care Screwdriver Set

Cabela's -- Wheeler Deluxe Gunsmithing Screwdriver Set
 

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Try Chapman Tools....they (used to, anyway...) offer a Gun Screwdriver set; some high-quality flat-blades, Phillips, Torx and hex....
Bought mine many moons ago for about $20....probably double that now.....
 

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Well, I'm a maintenance mechanic/electrician and pretty much have every tool imaginable at my disposal. Two of the most handy tools I have though are the Klein 10-in-1 screwdriver and a Pachmayer gunsmithing screwdriver set. If you have a 1/4" nut driver, then you can pick up a universal drill driver bit set at Lowes or most hardware stores that will have everything you need. The magnetic tools help a lot. Every tip you'll ever need shouldn't cost you more than $40 including some oddballs like Robertson heads and tamper-proof torx.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all. For flats and guns I am likely to go with Brownel's magnatips but unsure, Chapman and Pachmayer are options as well.

For hex and torx I think I have found what I was looking for at Wiha tools, between set 71997 (39 Pc Security Inert bit Set from Wiha) and 75990 (Micro Precision Screwdriver Bit Sets) I am good to go for awhile, it isn't everything, but good enough for now.
 

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As for the hex, I prefer a set of allen wrenches. Hex key - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia They come in metric (more common) or SAE (in 1/16's of an inch) Get both sets. The pocket knife style holders that fold out are convenient. If you have tight spaces, sometimes you need the old fashioned angled style. $10

For torx, a security bit set like the one you have works just fine. They even have them at Home Depot or Lowes. Look for replaceable tips for a cordless screwdriver in torx sizes and use it in a magnetic hex tipped hand scredrivew that matches. That is probably the cheapest. The sizes are very standardized (T4, T5, T6, T7, T8) so they don't have the screw damage problems flat-heads do. Sears has various torx sets as well. $15

I work as a machinist and have over 100 screwdrivers and countless bit sets. I love torx. If something antique or valuable has flatheads, I often have to grind a screwdriver to match the particular screw to avoid damage. It takes time. I buy old tools at garage sales and sometimes modify them for specific tasks.

I know you didn't ask, but if you are working on nuts and bolts, always use 6 point sockets. They are far more secure than 12 point sockets and are less likely to damage things. Fixed box style wrenches are fine too. Adjustable Crescent wrenches have no place in precision work.

Match the correct Phillips screwdriver to the screw and replace the screwdriver often. They go bad and start causing damage to the screw heads.

It is a valuable skill to learn how to put firm downward pressure on a screw while turning it to avoid slipping up out of the slot, or out the side. Learn what torque is and how to approximate torquing things correctly with your hands. Always ensure the screw head is clean and rust free.

:)
 

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I went with a Smith and Wesson Power bit set (since I already have a number of screwdrivers that can hold bits well).(got mine at Amazon).

* Straight bits: 0.120-Inch, 0.138-Inch, 0.154-Inch, 0.185-Inch, 0.216-Inch, 0.248-Inch, 0.278-Inch, 0.312-Inch and 0.360-Inch
* Torx bits: T10, T15, T20, T25 and T27
* Phillips bits: no.0, no.1 and no.2
* Metric hex bits: 2mm, 2.5mm, 3mm, 4mm, 5mm
* Hex bits: 1/16-Inch, 5/64-Inch, 3/32-Inch, 7/64-Inch, 1/8-Inch, 9/64-Inch, 5/32-Inch, 3/16-Inch, 7/32-Inch and 1/4-Inch

It worked well for some screws that had bent some cheaper bits (such as on the sideplate of a brand new 442).
 
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