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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my favorite YouTube personalities, The Lock Picking Lawyer, posted a keynote speech he gave recently at a security conference. It is long, but I think interesting and even entertaining. The most important thing about it is his discussion about the lock making and locksmithing industries and why the locks we have on our houses and guns (he is a gun owner) can be defeated very easily, even the new high tech models. The industry has embraced mass production mediocrity our of pure greed and are still producing products whose flaws have been documented for decades. He even demonstrates. If you are familiar with his channel, he can go through just about any lock in less than a minute, sometimes not even using lockpicks. It is kind of scary when you think about it.

He also talks about the ethics of keeping this info hidden from the public versus letting people know about it.

 

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Picking a lock is helpful when one wishes to breach a secured space, perform their intended task, and then close the lock to deter detection that the space was breached.

With the advent of $150 battery operated cut-off tools, most padlocks have become anachronistic in preventing the breach of a space where stealth or intrigue is not a consideration. I live in the country not too far from a small town that had a recent rash of shed and barn thefts. Those that were secured with various locks were opened in seconds when the lock shackles were severed with a portable cut off tool.

Full disclosure, I have not watched the video due to its length but will probably check it out later when I have more time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Picking a lock is helpful when one wishes to breach a secured space, perform their intended task, and then close the lock to deter detection that the space was breached.

With the advent of $150 battery operated cut-off tools, most padlocks have become anachronistic in preventing the breach of a space where stealth or intrigue is not a consideration. I live in the country not too far from a small town that had a recent rash of shed and barn thefts. Those that were secured with various locks were opened in seconds when the lock shackles were severed with a portable cut off tool.

Full disclosure, I have not watched the video due to its length but will probably check it out later when I have more time.
FWIW, The Lock Picking Lawyer gets into what you are saying on his channel, although not in his speech. He has videos on destructive lock forcing like you are talking about. Another method is using a Ramset tool, normally used for setting nails in concrete. He shows how you can break the body of a padlock using the Ramset without a nail, just allowing the piston to hit the lock. It works really well.

He even tested a couple of padlocks against a Barrett .50 caliber rifle, probably more for fun than practicality.

But the problem with locks is not just padlocks. He shows home locks to be the worst and there are ways to defeat them that don't even involve picking. Also, he got into one of those bedside gun safes using just a table fork. Really fascinating stuff.
 

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Thanks for posting the video, I thought we would finally get a look at this mysterious voice. :)

I always look at these videos and they have helped educate me on locks in general. For example, in the video he talks about tubular locks and how easy they are compromised with an impressioning tool, although he didn't do so well with a common one in the video. I bookmarked it here:


Anyway, when I was looking for a keyed lock to be used for added security to work in conjunction with a Simplex lock, his and other's videos helped me to see what not to consider. The Camlock T8 is what I decided on and with it's security features and price point. If you have a cheap one on something and want a little better lock you might consider one of these.



Product features:

о 10-pin Radial Pin Tumbler
о Exclusive Octagon mechanism
о Designed to resist drilling, drive-through and physical attacks
о Deflective hardened steel anti-drill center post
о Key controlled, you cannot buy a blank
о Can cross suite within the T8 technology family


https://www.camlock.com/sites/defau...-datasheet-cylinders-Series-T8-Cam-Lock_2.pdf
 

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I have said before, what most people buy as gunsafes are not even registered as safes, they are registered as Security cabinets!
With that said, I have never seen a Gunsafe opened on site to get the contents. They are not generally worth the risk in time and the noise it takes to open one. So again They keep the honest honest, and make it easier to just break into the next house that does not have a safe!
Home locks are very much the same! They make it inconvenient for the burglar. But how much more difficult is it to take a step right or left and break out a window?

For most of us Security is about making my home less attractive to the BG than the house next door!

On another note, the price of safes has gotten to the point that anyone can own one. And that price point is also what brought about Home Invasions!
Asian gangs mostly preyed on other Asians. They knew that they did not trust banks and that Business owners Kept their money at home. All they had to do was watch till everyone was gone and break in.
Until some bright Business Owner bought a safe! Now he could leave home and the Gangs could not do anything about it!
That worked till some one got the idea that if they caught everyone at home They could threaten the family till dad opened the safe himself!
Better locks are also what brought about carjacking! It became easier to take the car while it was already running! DR
 

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Any security device man can devise can be defeated by man. Having said that, they still work to deter criminals in that anything that takes their time, requires noise, or attracts attention will usually divert their attention to an easier target.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Any security device man can devise can be defeated by man. Having said that, they still work to deter criminals in that anything that takes their time, requires noise, or attracts attention will usually divert their attention to an easier target.
All too true, but it is shameful the extent to which the lock industry has hyped improvements that are not real. They have made relatively little progress in decades, whereas other areas of security, like computer security, have worked hard to keep up with the threat, albeit not always succeeding. A lock picker of 50 years ago would have no trouble with the home locks of today. There are real improvements that have been invented, but big lock companies don't adopt them.
 

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People don’t pick locks to break into something for the most part. Improvements against force and structure reinforcements is where you will be better off spending money to upgrade your security. A hardened structure will deter most to move on to the next opportunity.

Having a safe/RSC of decent quality will probably mean they just take your tv and electronics and move along. At least that’s my hope.
 

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Good quality locks are a fine idea. Unfortunately some people buy good locks and install them on flimsy doors. Even good steel doors (residential) are usually mounted in wood casings, typically soft wood about 5/8" to 3/4" thickness, and a solid kick or two breaks the door frame out of the wall, usually right where the good deadbolt engages the strike plate. This can be overcome to some degree by installing heavy duty strike plates and using hardened steel screws to mount the strike plate, screws long enough to penetrate through the wall framing. A simple upgrade that costs very little and takes no more time than doing it on the cheap.

Nothing is absolute, but anything we can do to make our homes just a little more difficult than others will make us a little less likely to be the victim.
 

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Locks keep honest people honest.
My dad used to say that all the time. As others have said, with battery powered tools just about any job is possible. You just have to try and make your property as unattractive to thieves as you can.

I have cameras, quality locks, safes, nosey neighbors and pay for good insurance.

A friend of mine has a decent idea and one I may do. He has an old glass door gun cabinet that he has filled with the cheapest long guns he owns. The safe is hidden in the closet with the more expensive items. His hope is a desperate thief will smash and grab the guns sitting in the gun cabinet.
 

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I believe locks are just to make it harder for thieves. The more trouble a bad guy has to engage in the more likely they will go away. I value a good alarm system. Of course, someone with special skills could bypass an alarm but why would people with those skills target me? My way is layered protection, security doors, entrance door, dogs that bark, quality alarm system.
 

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Had locks/keys changed on our house the day we closed; locksmith warned me not to get locked out of the house as this particular lock (Kwikset) is not easy to pick. Also, being near the ocean, house has impact (laminated/hurricane) windows which would hinder access a bit.
Like @retired badge 1 said, making the house less attractive to potential intruders and @mr.stuart said, layers including dogs that bark might be sufficient to make potential burglars choose a different house.
If someone knocks on our door, the GSD will bark and someone outside the door can discern that it is not a small dog doing the barking, big dogs sound big. Bullmastiff rarely barks, if he does there is no doubt (without seeing him) it came from a big dog. Whether they would actually engage a burglar who broke into the home (doubtful) is less important than deterrence of the event. We have an electronic alarm with little stickers that let people know the house has an alarm. It would probably be just as effective to put their picture and write, "This is whats barking behind the door"
Plant Dog German shepherd dog Carnivore Dog breed


Lots of dogs will bark if someone knocks on the door, some breeds are better suited for home protection:
Font Rectangle Material property Parallel Screenshot
 

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Had locks/keys changed on our house the day we closed; locksmith warned me not to get locked out of the house as this particular lock (Kwikset) is not easy to pick. Also, being near the ocean, house has impact (laminated/hurricane) windows which would hinder access a bit.
Like @retired badge 1 said, making the house less attractive to potential intruders and @mr.stuart said, layers including dogs that bark might be sufficient to make potential burglars choose a different house.
If someone knocks on our door, the GSD will bark and someone outside the door can discern that it is not a small dog doing the barking, big dogs sound big. Bullmastiff rarely barks, if he does there is no doubt (without seeing him) it came from a big dog. Whether they would actually engage a burglar who broke into the home (doubtful) is less important than deterrence of the event. We have an electronic alarm with little stickers that let people know the house has an alarm. It would probably be just as effective to put their picture and write, "This is whats barking behind the door"
View attachment 368146

Lots of dogs will bark if someone knocks on the door, some breeds are better suited for home protection:
View attachment 368147
My Sheepdog Poodle mix will show you where the good China is.
 
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My Sheepdog Poodle mix will show you where the good China is.
If a burglar came prepared, the Bullmastiff would help carry my stuff for the right incentive.
Anybody with these is his new best friend:
 

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The LEOs on the forum can confirm or deny what I'm about to say, but lock picking is only a factor in a small minority of burglaries, and likely those of very high value that attract skilled professional burglars. Must burglars are smash and grab artists, who have no real skill. They look for a front door that can be opened with a kick, then try to be in and out in less than five minutes. If they can't do that, they move on. The trick it to improve your houses physical resistance to brute force attacks, making them slower and noisier. These skels are not going to hang around and keep trying to find alternate routes into your house. They'll just move on if it isn't easy to get into. A good side effect of this is that someone tries to break in when you're home, they'd likely have to make enough noise that you'd be alerted in time to react effectively.
 

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My house was broken into once. It took two days for my ferocious Corgi/sheltie mix watchdog to come out of the closet.
 
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If a burglar came prepared, the Bullmastiff would help carry my stuff for the right incentive.
Anybody with these is his new best friend:”
LOL our Golden too.
In the 70s my family had a wolf mix brought back from a hunting trip. I never heard it bark. We came home from dinner one night with the “dog” in the front yard. Dad sees a broken window, calls the police, they find the burglar down the road nearly passed out from blood loss. There was blood all around the window inside and out. No barks heard, apparently just waited for the burglar to enter the house and then went out the window with him. About the opposite of our Golden.
 
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