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If one is prone to "thumb capping" the slide as one does with a hammer fired gun or SCD equipped Glock, the web of the hand comes off the grip safety of an XD.
Exactly. On any non-1911 pistol, I always hold the thumb forward when holstering because otherwise, the slide can ride backwards from the friction of the holster. And like you said, this automatically takes the web of the hand off the grip safety.

With a Glock or a non-safety model M&P (and a few others), all it would take to cause an ND is something catching the trigger.
 

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Take a more direct approach. Buy a striker fired gun with a manual safety.
My striker-fired edc has a manual safety. Along with 100 % trigger discipline, it gives me a second failure node.

(Full disclosure, I used to work in risk assessment and analysis.)

.
 

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No. You wrap your fingers around the front strap while your thumb holds the slide forward. It's very simple.
A proper grip technique is what is needed to disengage the XD grip safety so one can fire a round, and many well trained shooters don't alter their grip when reholstering, so what you're saying is, one DOES have to alter their grip a bit to re-engage that XD grip safety. I'm not addressing the ease or difficulty of doing that, just that it must be done in order to re-engage the grip safety. NOT altering my grip means the grip safety stays depressed, in which case any object accidentally pressing the trigger could cause a discharge.

The grip safety doesn't bother me, but I'd never buy anything from them because of the lobbying they did back in 2017 in favor of the bill that eventually passed, that caused a huge number of licensed dealers to go under this year. That was really self serving of them.

I'll stick with my Glocks.
 

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A proper grip technique is what is needed to disengage the XD grip safety so one can fire a round, and many well trained shooters don't alter their grip when reholstering, so what you're saying is, one DOES have to alter their grip a bit to re-engage that XD grip safety. I'm not addressing the ease or difficulty of doing that, just that it must be done in order to re-engage the grip safety. NOT altering my grip means the grip safety stays depressed, in which case any object accidentally pressing the trigger could cause a discharge.
I'm not arguing that point. Yes, if the grip safety is depressed when holstering and something snags the trigger, the gun fires. But..... at least it gives you the OPTION of holstering in a manner that doesn't depress the safety, thereby preventing an ND. A Glock doesn't give one that option.

The grip safety doesn't bother me, but I'd never buy anything from them because of the lobbying they did back in 2017 in favor of the bill that eventually passed, that caused a huge number of licensed dealers to go under this year. That was really self serving of them.
I've heard that story. But for my own selfish purposes, I like Springfield and plan to not only keep mine but possibly buy more someday.
 

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First off, nearly all striker fired pistols are DAO designs. While a few could best be called hybrids of a type, such as the Smith & Wesson M&P family, most are double action only pistols. And while it is also true that most of these do not have second strike capability, that does not mean the are something other than DAO pistols. Remember, a handgun's action designation relies solely upon the tasks performed by the trigger assembly.
 

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Interesting... I would think most people reholster without altering their grip, so wouldn't that result in the XD grip safety being depressed while reholstering?
My hand comes off the backstrap on every pistol I holster because my thumb is always on the hammer or between gun and hammer on a 1911 or just on the back of the slide on a striker. Just a lifetime habit I suppose but, I would never holster a gun with my firing grip on a handgun.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Wow guys, this is great disscussion with many informative comments; very glad I joined here. Though many questions have been answered, I still have many more. For three years I tried to get comfortable with the idea of carrying a PPQ, but, with its short take up and light trigger(which helped me be very accurate), I really did feel I had a rattler in my holster. With no plan for carry, I traded it for a P229; great gun, just doesn't feel and shoot as well as the Q for me.
 

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Wow guys, this is great disscussion with many informative comments; very glad I joined here. Though many questions have been answered, I still have many more. For three years I tried to get comfortable with the idea of carrying a PPQ, but, with its short take up and light trigger(which helped me be very accurate), I really did feel I had a rattler in my holster. With no plan for carry, I traded it for a P229; great gun, just doesn't feel and shoot as well as the Q for me.
If you like the added security of 229s and Hk LEM pistols, you just need more Gray Guns in your life.

https://grayguns.com/


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My hand comes off the backstrap on every pistol I holster because my thumb is always on the hammer or between gun and hammer on a 1911 or just on the back of the slide on a striker. Just a lifetime habit I suppose but, I would never holster a gun with my firing grip on a handgun.
My hand comes off the backstrap too when reholstering, thumb planted firmly on the back of the slide pushes the handgun back into the holster. It's something I do because some of my holsters are fairly snub and pushing the handgun by the backstrap can cause the gun to come out of battery. While it would probably go back into battery on the draw, I don't want to depend upon that.
 

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Hi All

Most strikers I can shoot more accurately than TDA, DAO, or LEM. However, in over 15 years of CC, I've never carried one. The reason is fear of A/N discharge. I practice, but tight groups come much easier with aforementioned guns I don't carry. Any one been there and have good advise?
I will NEVER CC a striker gun unless it a Walther P99AS with the decock feature or one with a non-afterthought positive manual safety. All it takes is one time for Murphy to strike and your life could be changed forever. Why make it easier for him?
 

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As evidenced by this thread, some never become comfortable with a striker fired CCW. I've gone from revolver (OWB), to 1911, to striker, to SAO hammer fired, and back to striker carried IWB. I've practiced, practiced, practiced with every firearm such that I was always safe and confident in my carry. Each person must assess their own comfort level and go with works for them. There is no one size fits all answer to the OP's question.
 

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Hi All

Most strikers I can shoot more accurately than TDA, DAO, or LEM. However, in over 15 years of CC, I've never carried one. The reason is fear of A/N discharge. I practice, but tight groups come much easier with aforementioned guns I don't carry. Any one been there and have good advise?

Well why not become better with the hammer fired pistols?? Good excuse to get more range time in.
How much of a difference in groups are you getting??
Sit down think it over. Are you going to be taking head shots at a hostage taker holding a loved one at 25 yards with only a small section of their heads showing from behind said loved one?? Chasing tight groups is fun and rewarding but sometimes way way over emphasized in my opinion. Improve your da/sa game and no need to worry over the striker fired platform. Might I suggest a nice CZ 9mm with a spring kit from Cajun Gun Works those pistols will make a mediocre shooter look good and they sexxy as heck.
 

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"How do you become comfortable with a striker for a CCW?"

When I learned how long striker mechanisms have been in existence, and when I learned about the Kahr "DAO" striker approach, I purchased my K9 and almost immediately began CC-ing it comfortably, with no increased fear of ND/AD.

rx7sig
 

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First off, nearly all striker fired pistols are DAO designs. While a few could best be called hybrids of a type, such as the Smith & Wesson M&P family, most are double action only pistols. And while it is also true that most of these do not have second strike capability, that does not mean the are something other than DAO pistols. Remember, a handgun's action designation relies solely upon the tasks performed by the trigger assembly.
While a portion of striker fired guns could be considerd DAO, in the context of the OPs concerns this is not a benefit, as the simplicity of a DAO design is present but the length of travel and typical weight of a true DAO pistol is absent.

If one were to take a 3rd Gen S&W or a Beretta D model and compare it to any current striker fired pistol , except for anything in a NYPD configuration, the difference in trigger characteristics is astounding.



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I generally require a DA trigger or a manual safety on a CCW. By DA trigger, I mean a DA/SA or a DAO, not a half-cocked striker "DA". My main daily carry is a FN Hi Power, and I have trained myself to sweep off the safety when I draw it.
 

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Wow guys, this is great disscussion with many informative comments; very glad I joined here. Though many questions have been answered, I still have many more. For three years I tried to get comfortable with the idea of carrying a PPQ, but, with its short take up and light trigger(which helped me be very accurate), I really did feel I had a rattler in my holster. With no plan for carry, I traded it for a P229; great gun, just doesn't feel and shoot as well as the Q for me.
The difference in triggers is the reason you're seeing such a change in your shooting, but training and dry fire practice will improve that. The PPQ has one of THE lightest, shortest triggers of any pistol- I even listened to a top trainer say he thinks PPQ triggers are too risky for the average concealed carrier. Grayguns (like JD mentioned), or Robert Burke/the Sig Armorer, would do an amazing job perfecting your 229 trigger, if you so desire.
 

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All my concealed carry has been with Glock and, for the past 5.5 years has been AIWB. I plan on, and expect, no NDs holstering or drawing. I don’t reholster AIWB but instead unsnap and pull the holster and insert the Glock into it in plain view and without muzzling myself or anyone else. Then I replace the holster into waistband. No problemas.
 
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