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Discussion Starter #1
Well according to one of my classes, we were told that it's a good idea to get a blood test every year and request that your doctor check for LEAD LEVELS.

Especially if you:
*shoot often
*shoot in an indoor range
*handle more than a few hundred rounds a month
*are an instructor or RSO
*reload
*smoke, eat, drink, or chew gum on the range (yes, it violates most safety rules, but I see lots of folks chew gum or bring water bottles, especially in hot weather)
*forget to wash your hands after the range and then eat or drink

Many of us go for annual exams, and usually get the bloodwork run, but did you know that UNLESS YOU ASK, they will not run lead levels?

"Normal" levels should be under 10 ppm, as I understand it.

Now please, next time you go for your annual physical and bloodwork, ask your doctor to run the test for lead levels. Lead poisoning doesn't just happen when babies eat old paint chips.

This has been a Bunny PSA :)
 

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I do a written blood test every six months.

I've never failed yet for anything yet!
 

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Dang!! And all this time I been worried about STD's!!! :danceban: :rofl:
 

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Yes, I have to have blood work done at least once a year testing for, among other toxins, lead.

It's a work thing.
 

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Most definately! Especially if you shoot often in an indoor range. Yes, they run air filters, but that doesn't do anything as you are standing there in the "cloud" from your just-fired string.

Oh, and always, always, always wash your hands, face and any exposed skin in cool water after handling/shooting your guns/ammo.

Thanks for the reminder, Bunny!
 

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Annually or more frequent more all of the usual suspects (PSA's, cholesterol, etc.). Not for lead thou, since I do not reload, use jacketed rounds, and exercise "extreme" hygiene at the ranges. I'll put it on the list to ask Doc thou.

Good reminder.
 

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EXCELLENT idea.

I get one every year along with a physical. I hadn't thought about the lead thing. I don't handle hardly any lead, and I don't shoot in an indoor range. I'm probably not risky but I might add the lead check to my next blood test anyway.

You know that request might be a conversation opener and good way to see where your Doc stands on 2A stuff. :image035:
 

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I will admit I don't. I will also admit I am the guy who most Doctors don't want as a patient, other than my Orthopedic Surgeon of course. I wait until I have a laundry list of problems, and then I'll only do about half of what my Dr. tells me to.

I will only get blood tests done when it is used to rule out an illness.
 

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I didnt know there was supposed to be blood in my alcohol system? :blink: :bier:
 

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I would if the doc wouldnt get the results and try and put me in the hospital every time. My blood chemistry is toxic to most people. Heck my Iron levels are toxic but normal for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Here is another tip I learned:

When at the range, if you can not wash your hand immediately after, use ALCOHOL-BASED gel to "wash" and then immediately use wipes. The gel is cool and will loosen copper/lead residue and the wipes will wipe most of it away. It's not the best option, but it's better than nothing.

We usually go out for Slushies or lunch after shooting (or Hooters wings, if I'm with the guys) and so I always bring a big thing of skel gel and some lysol wipes in my range bag. We actually go over it in the "range safety" portion of the basic classes.
 

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Just out of curiosity, what if you do have heightened levels of lead, what can/would they do?:confused:
 

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It IS an STD.

Shooting Transmitted Disease :blink:
You got me on that one....... :35:

You know......by bringing this up, some liberal is gonna want ban bullets like they did chinese toys because of lead based paint!! :yup:

On the serious side..... no, guess I have never thought about lead in the blood needing tested for....guess we mostly think we do not handle enough lead to be worried about it..... might make for interested studies....... I DO however practice safe shooting..... :hand5:
 

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Had a Range Supervisor get pulled off the line for 2-3 months b/c of high levels not too long ago - he has spent many years running an an outdoor range, so it does take a while. Men process lead out of their bodies easier than women, kids (especially under 6), or pregnant women. We always cringe when we see little kids come to the range especially on busy days - not b/c we don't want them shooting, but parents don't think about size appropriate hearing/eye protection, hygiene, or just coming to the range on off days to minimize the airborne risk. People store lead not just in soft tissues, but also bones which leach the lead out over time. Kids are more susceptible to long term issues like palsy, learning probems, other permanent neurological problems - keep an eye on them.

I think it is just a waiting game for your body to rid itself of toxins. Wiki says chelation therapy also works and having appropriate levels of Ca, Zn, and Iron is preventative. The lead problem is more the airborne particles from primers firing, inhaled or ingested, than handling ammunition or components so not reloading isn't a pass on the tests, while shooting at indoor ranges is a red flag.

Good thing to bring up Bunny.
 

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Bunny- Great advice. The Doc only checks for xyz unless you ask for a thru w (but you gotta pay for it).

I shoot at the same range you do and you know.... it can get dang hot there and I always bring water and drink it right there where I'm shooting. And we do the same thing when we shoot at my wife's dad's farm. I'll start keeping it in a cooler and drink it at the car. The one thing we do sorta right is everybody cleans there hands with hand sanitizer before we leave.

Is the problem with lead that I'm drinking water where the gun was shot or that I have lead residue on my hands? or both? Maybe we need to shoot some, wash up, and then drink water???

Good post.
 
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