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I've already got my CHP class scheduled, and already have the funds to buy a gun come the gunshow Dec 5th. So I will be carrying concealed in a few weeks.

So would it be worthwhile to buy an extra mag with some snap caps, and use that for dry fire practicing? I realize this could be done with a normal mag and snap caps, but in the interest of keeping being safe I think having a designated practice mag (Bottom painted orange to differentiate it from my others) would be a good idea. I have experience with firearms but have none drawing from a holster of any kind and acquiring a target. The class will probably cover this to an extent but perfect practice makes perfect no?

I already read the procedures for safe dry firing exercises at home, and figure it would be worthwhile. I was just curious as to what the more experienced carriers here would have to say on it before I make the purchase.

I was also thinking on getting a 22 pistol so I could buy a ton of ammo and get some good trigger time running exercises the next time I go to my friends land to plink/run drills with. Good idea or no? 22 ammo is super cheap compared to practicing exclusively with 9mm or 40cal.
 

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I think the .22 to practice trigger control is a great idea! I'm not one to preach the advantages of snap caps, but I'm also not against them. I've simply never used them.
 

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I think the .22 to practice trigger control is a great idea! I'm not one to preach the advantages of snap caps, but I'm also not against them. I've simply never used them.
I only consider this because if I practice slingshot I heard a slingshot on an empty chamber causes damage to some guns.
 

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Yes on both accounts. Classes vary in what they teach for CPL, CHP, or whatever your area calls it.
First, dryfire exercises; Yes it is a good idea to practice drawing from your holster with your carry gun. PLEASE use snap caps and follow all the dryfire rules for this exercise. Holster 'drills' are an important part of muscle memory training. After enough repetitive actions, you won't have to think about that part anymore, it will just happen naturally; and if you have done it safely and correctly, it will happen that way.
Second, .22 practice; Yes it is a good idea. Mostly for sight picture, and just shooting drills/practice. It's value is slightly diminished unless your .22 is the same as your daily carry, (.22 conversion for a Glock or 1911, or similar) because the grip angle, sight picture, natural point of aim, and controls will be different. Another words, it will not help in 'some' of the muscle memory areas.
However, you sound like you are off to a good start. Ask questions. Practice. Ask more questions. Practice. Go to some good classes; and did I say practice?
Getting your permit to carry is only the first step in becoming a trained sheepdog.
 

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I only consider this because if I practice slingshot I heard a slingshot on an empty chamber causes damage to some guns.
Sure, I've heard it can too. I've had guns where the manufacture said to use them and some said that I didn't need to. Like I said, I'm not for or against them...I just have no experience.
 

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Snapping in does not hurt.

My first exposure to a 1911 was in the USMC.
We put an expended .22 case in the mag to keep it from hitting the slide stop.
Then we would snap in and another plt member would work the slide as if it fired. Then snap in again and so on.
It must have worked because I shot expert on qual day
So snap in unless you have much expierence with handguns.
 

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Practice, practice, practice; all aspects of the process. Taking the time to learn sight alignment, sight picture and trigger control are great; but only half the equation in a defensive situation. You have to be able to draw and acquire the target also. The .22 will help, especially if you can get a conversion for your carry gun. Holster drills will help. I also shoot IDPA and IPSC competitions at local clubs to get some practical drills. I use my carry gun with my carry holster, etc. Am I competitive against the guys with "game gear?" No, not really. But I'm not there for the game, I'm there for the practice (and a lot of fun). I'd suggest finding a local club that runs matches, especially IDPA.
 

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Living in the desert I have the chance to do it EACH time I go shooting. Roughly once every two weeks on average. I work on foot work, body position, grip, draw time, vocabulary, and multiple targets. Not doing so is irresponsible, since god forbid I am ever in a situation I WILL know what to do.
 

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I practice drawing mine all the time. Dry draw and hot draw when shooting.
 

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Stay armed...get training and practice...stay safe!:yup:
 

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These posts are definitly interesting. For me, I've been going to the range for the past few years approximately 2x per month. I set up multiple targets (normally 3) and stand no farther than 15' from the farthest target. I then draw and fire two rounds rapidly into each target then reholster. I will normally expend a 50 count box of ammo per practice.

This training has helped me develop two things. A high level of comfort in carrying chambered and making a rapid draw and fire second nature on multiple targets.
 

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Dry fire and practising your draw is always a good idea. Make sure when you are practising your draw you are doing it with your cover regular garment though.

Another posted mentioned IDPA. I'd second that.
 

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These posts are definitly interesting. For me, I've been going to the range for the past few years approximately 2x per month. I set up multiple targets (normally 3) and stand no farther than 15' from the farthest target. I then draw and fire two rounds rapidly into each target then reholster. I will normally expend a 50 count box of ammo per practice. This training has helped me develop two things. A high level of comfort in carrying chambered and making a rapid draw and fire second nature on multiple targets.
One suggestion I would add here, (not insinuating that you don't do this but it wasn't mentioned)
DO NOT do the same thing every time you go to the range. The same target setup, round count, or routine can cause real problems if you find yourself in a real situation. The training sets your mind up to do those things instinctively, and you might not want to do exactly what you have ingrained into your mind. Those two shots on a target to the left or right just might be an innocent bystander.

There have been cases where LEO's have trained to draw, put two shots on target, and reholster, then do it again; then did just that in a real situation and not survive, because two shots did not stop the threat. Also, back in the revolver days the drill was to shoot dry, empty the casings into your hand, stow them, and then reload; in a notable shootout there was at least one LEO that died with casings in his hand. Better to train by dumping them on the ground. (I say same with empty magazines)

All good suggestions here though.
 

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The guy that taught me to lay block before when I was a kid had a saying when ever he saw me trying to go fast he’d tell me “You worry about doing it right, speed will come.”

I practice drawing and acquiring a target but I don’t practice speed draws. I worked as a security guard during college and the post I was assigned to was a one man post. So, I would practice drawing every night, slowly, correct position, correct sight picture, always at a controlled speed, always proper motion. I also practiced completing the draw even if I fumbled it (no do overs in a gun fight).

Long story short one night I was walking the fence line and something very big slammed into the fence right next to me. The only thing that separated us was the fence. The muscle memory paid off and I drew W/ out giving it conscious thought and was on target before what ever hit the fence had time to get up and run away. I am almost positive it was a deer but I didn’t know that when it hit the fence.
 

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Practice, practice, practice; all aspects of the process. Taking the time to learn sight alignment, sight picture and trigger control are great; but only half the equation in a defensive situation. You have to be able to draw and acquire the target also. The .22 will help, especially if you can get a conversion for your carry gun. Holster drills will help. I also shoot IDPA and IPSC competitions at local clubs to get some practical drills. I use my carry gun with my carry holster, etc. Am I competitive against the guys with "game gear?" No, not really. But I'm not there for the game, I'm there for the practice (and a lot of fun). I'd suggest finding a local club that runs matches, especially IDPA.
+1 on the IDPA idea
International Defensive Pistol Association
 

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Airsoft

There are some Airsoft guns out there that are copies of existing pistols- I have one in 1911 and one in Taurus Millenium. If you have something like that, you can use your normal carry rig, be safe, and even practice firing into an indoor target.
 

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Just did it tonight in an IPSC match. I do it whenever I get a chance to shoot IPSC, IDPA and any other action pistol matches. My favorite event is a full day of IDPA where I can shoot the G26 at the stages in the morning from my IWB holster (kydex Inside Armor) and concealment, then shoot the same stages with my G34 and an OWB Blade Tech kydex holster. Some times the difference is hardly noticeable in my scores.

Some times prior to a match, I'll practice drawing and dry firing. In my book, any practice is better than simply standing there and punching holes in paper with a solid freestyle grip. If I can't draw and shoot, I'll test the limits with my strong hand only and my weak hand only for speed and accuracy.
 

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Dry fire/presentation practice is an essential part of keeping my skills sharp! :wink:

Weapon is unloaded and ammo left in another room prior to practice drills. :hand10:
 
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