Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have 2 1911's, a Gander Mtn exclusive Kimber Ultra Carry with Crimson Trace grips (purchased 6/25/09, 850 rounds through it) and an old LLama IX-D double stack that I purchased years ago. As you know .45 ammo is expensive, and I do not know of a .22 conversion kit for either of these. Thinking of getting a Kimber Pro tle/rl and a conversion kit.

Anyway, does anyone have a recommended practice schedule/round count that they would recommend?

Should I practice more with the Kimber or IX-D? Does it matter?

What should my specific realistic goal be as far as accuracy? (other than the obvious bullseye)

I am a newb so forgive me if this sounds elementary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,177 Posts
You can practice by dry firing your guns,make sure they are unloaded and put the ammo in another room#2make sure they are unloaded and chamber is empty,now pick a spot on the wall and after cocking the hammer and flicking safety on practice taking safety off and squeezing the trigger keeping your sights on target,you can also put a coin behind the front sight to check for flinching,you can also do holster work in your home in front of a mirror practice drawing and engaging a target,work on smooth draws and then work on getting faster,remember smooth is quick.Since you have a laser grip you can also check Point of aim when you draw to see if even without a laser you are aiming COM after drawing.Good luck
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,765 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,765 Posts
I wish I could afford to practice everyday... I'm doing good if I can shoot once a month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,469 Posts
Sadly most of my 1911 work is done without ammo.

Actually only live fire about 2 times a month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
I have 2 1911's, a Gander Mtn exclusive Kimber Ultra Carry with Crimson Trace grips (purchased 6/25/09, 850 rounds through it) and an old LLama IX-D double stack that I purchased years ago. As you know .45 ammo is expensive, and I do not know of a .22 conversion kit for either of these. Thinking of getting a Kimber Pro tle/rl and a conversion kit.

Anyway, does anyone have a recommended practice schedule/round count that they would recommend?

Should I practice more with the Kimber or IX-D? Does it matter?

What should my specific realistic goal be as far as accuracy? (other than the obvious bullseye)

I am a newb so forgive me if this sounds elementary.
Purchase a .22 that is set up like the gun you intend to carry. Then you can practice all you want. .22 ammo is still cheap. Remember this though, most SD shootings will occur at less that 10 feet. Don't worry about bulls eyes. Keep your eye on the front sight, and shoot. Bulls eyes are for target shooting, you won't be target shooting in a SD situation. Practice your draw, start slow. Muscle memory is important! Get the basics down first, speed will come. I would suggest that you purchase the NRA series of DVD's on SD, they are very good, and will teach you more than you will ever use. If you are not a member of NRA, then go ahead and sign up! Practice does not make perfect! Only Perfect Practice makes perfect! Learn, get it right the first time!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
+ 1 to what the others are saying. As far as round count and a standard of proficiency, I say practice as much as time and finances allow until YOU feel confident in your abilities with wichever gun.

I do think a .22 conversion is one of the best training tools you can have, but it is not all there is. When $ per rnd is important (when isn't it?), concentrate less on how many rnds fired and more on the quality of each shot.

Practice slow, but with perfection of form as your ultimate goal. As with any physical skill speed will come with enough repetition.

Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,046 Posts
+1 on dry fire practice. It should be an essential part of your overall practice. It is cheap and easy.

Once you have gone through all the required safety issues regarding dry fire practice, you can improve and perfect your draw stroke, reaction time, trigger control and obtaining that critical "muscle memory" skills without spending a dime.

Live fire is another essential component of shooting skills.

Here you are limited by how much ammo you can afford and the other ancillary items such as, targets, cleaning gear and other stuff. And you are limited by availability of having appropriate place to shoot and practice.

As you may already know, marksmanship is a skill which deteriorates over time if you do not practice. In this case, I have learned that it isn't the quantity of rounds you shoot. It's the quality of effort devoted with the shots fired and how often you get to send rounds down range. So, if you can afford to shoot only one box of ammo every payday or even once a month, devoted to quality shooting techniques, you'll probably be ahead of the game for most individuals.

Yes, it's always fun to shoot a couple hundred rounds in a session, and if you can afford to do so, by all means do so. However, each shot fired should be directed at a well thought out method of improving your skill or mastering a technique or a drill for a specific scenario.

But if you save up to shoot several hundred rounds at a time but can only afford to do it once or twice a year, chances are, you won't be nearly as good as someone who shoots 25 or 50 rounds each month, or every two weeks.

Good luck and get on that dry fire practice. It's cheap and you don't even have to leave the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,198 Posts
One thing you might consider is reloading. I don't know if you save your brass, but it's one of the most expensive components of the cartridge. A beginners set up could probably had for $100. If you can, but in bulk, it's cheaper.
As for which gun to practice with, I would practice with the one I carry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Should I be concerned about how many rounds go through the gun? I see a lot of people in the classifieds section, making statements like "low round count" and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
reply

One thing you might consider is reloading. I don't know if you save your brass, but it's one of the most expensive components of the cartridge. A beginners set up could probably had for $100. If you can, but in bulk, it's cheaper.
As for which gun to practice with, I would practice with the one I carry.
I have started saving my brass. I have about 400 cases. 1300 rounds of FMJ, and 200 rounds of JHP. I would buy in bulk, but I can buy 100 ct boxes at WM for same price/round
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
One thing you might consider is reloading. I don't know if you save your brass, but it's one of the most expensive components of the cartridge. A beginners set up could probably had for $100. If you can, but in bulk, it's cheaper.
As for which gun to practice with, I would practice with the one I carry.
What reloading set up can I get for $100?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
Should I be concerned about how many rounds go through the gun? I see a lot of people in the classifieds section, making statements like "low round count" and such.
1. Well every 1800 rounds (quite certain, without going to check the handbook for the Ultra Carry) you will need to change the springs in your Kimber, so do count your rounds :yup:

2. Practice most often with the pistol you intend to carry for self defense (the Kimber i assume) thats the one you need to be proficient with :bier:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
^+1
and when I get to the range I try not to put any more than 50 or so rounds into the paper per gun. Saves on ammo, and reduces the chance to develope bad habits caused by fatigue. I'll focus on my least proficient.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
143,816 Posts
The Ruger 22/45 would be a great inexpensive gun to buy.
Same grip angle as a 1911.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
So, I'm really not getting the "practice with a specific gun or caliber" thing. I have an HK P2000sk 9mm that I should 100 rounds once a week with. Sometimes I'll rent a Kimber .45 or a USP in .40. I also just bought a Walther P22. At 7-10 yards I can shoot a 3" group just as well as with my own gun and I was shooting good groups with a light weight .22 in no time also.

I've only been shooting pistols a few years, but I did take some lessons and have good grasp on grip, sight alignment, sight picture, trigger control, etc...

I'm not sure why other people at the range that own tons of guns and seem to have been shooting for a long time pepper a target like they're shooting a shot gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
So, I'm really not getting the "practice with a specific gun or caliber" thing. I have an HK P2000sk 9mm that I should 100 rounds once a week with. Sometimes I'll rent a Kimber .45 or a USP in .40. I also just bought a Walther P22. At 7-10 yards I can shoot a 3" group just as well as with my own gun and I was shooting good groups with a light weight .22 in no time also.

I've only been shooting pistols a few years, but I did take some lessons and have good grasp on grip, sight alignment, sight picture, trigger control, etc...

I'm not sure why other people at the range that own tons of guns and seem to have been shooting for a long time pepper a target like they're shooting a shot gun.
LOL!:rofl:
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top