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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How possible would it be for me to get set up for reloading for under $500? I shoot mostly (in order) .357sig, .45, .38spcl, 9mm and would want to load these.

If you could list an average price for each piece of equipment I would need, that'd be much appreciated since I have no idea what is a good price and what piece of equipment is and isn't the best/worse.

Thanks!
 

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I think if you're patient, you can do it. Hard to give 'average' prices, but you need a press, a scale, a powder measure, and dies as a minimum. I'd look around for used equipment on line, in garage sales, and on gun store and range bulletin boards. Dies in pistol calibers and the popular rifle cals are backordered right now, but keep your eyes open.

You'll also need a few tools, like a decent dial caliper to measure loaded cartridge length, and an inertia-type bullet puller is handy for the rounds you will invariably need to deconstruct. Loading blocks and ammo boxes you can scrounge from factory ammo. That should be enough to get you started.
 

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Depending on what you are looking for keep an eye out on eBay, watch your prices and there are great deals to be found there.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses, guys. I have no idea what I need to keep a look out for though.

Could any of you be kind enough to tell me exactly what I'd need equipment wise to reload for .45?
 

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Here is a good start; in this manual you will find a great description of the tools needed and the steps in reloading ammunition. This book having been written by Richard Lee does lean heavily toward Lee branded reloading equipment the information can be applied to any manufacturer.

Lee Modern Reloading 2nd Edition Revised Reloading Manual
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Much appreciated! Will check it out now.
 

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"I" would procure bullets, powder and primers before I got to involved in buying equipment. The calibers you are looking to load can be covered with a few single powders that will save you some trouble. I would recommend Power Pistol to give decent full power loads in the chosen calibers.

Good luck.
 
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The problem is trying to buy reloading stuff now is that everybody started buying reloading stuff when ammo dried up.I just looked at Midway USA and every reloading press whether it's single stage or Progressive is OUT OF STOCK,but you can backorder one just no telling how long it takes to get one.The vendor at the Gun Show that sells reloading supplies hasn't been to one since January,I'm pretty sure it's because he doesn't need to travel to sell out of Powder Primers and Bullets.
What You Need to reload is
A press either single stage or progressive
Reloading dies for each caliber they come in a set resizing/powder charging case belling/seat and crimp,you can buy an optional factory crimp die
Powder,Unique/Bullseye/Power Pistol are pretty versatile powders
Primers small pistol and large pistol,the 45acp usually takes large pistol primers but I been finding a lot more 45 acp brass that started using small pistol primers
Bullets in each caliber
Under $500 your going to need to buy stuff locally unless you buy enough quantity online to offset shipping and hazmat fees on powder and primers.To be honest trying to find any reloading components is going to be hit and miss.
 

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Don't be in a hurry. With the scarcity of components (esp bullets, primers and powder), having the equipment is really not going to accomplish anything right now. As far as recommendations, I heartily recommend Dillon, but they may well be the most expensive. Some of the better brands of equipment are probably Dillon, RCBS, and Hornady, followed by Lee. I have a Dillon press (Square Deal B - which loads pistol caliber only) and dies, an RCBS scale, and various brands of accessories. For components, I use Berry's bullets, Winchester primers and usually Hodgdon HP-38, or Winchester 231 powder.

e-Bay is a good idea, as well as bulletin boards at LGS, and word of mouth, but you will probably find that when it comes to Dillon and RCBS, there are few savings buying used versus used. These two brands have very little depreciation over time. You might also want to watch estate sales.

As I said earlier, DON'T BE IN A HURRY, prices and availability will settle down in time. Just keep an eye out, and acquire what you need as you find it. No need to rush out and get the peripheral items like scales, calipers, bullet pullers, flip trays, etc., because they will undoubtedly be most readily available items.

Good luck, and BE SAFE!
 

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The problem is trying to buy reloading stuff now is that everybody started buying reloading stuff when ammo dried up.
Good opportunity to learn the joys of a Lee Hand Loader! K.I.S.S. can go a long way, and it's a great way to learn reloading. (Slower 'n' a caterpillar climbin' a sunflower plant, but it'll get you there.)

Cartridge cases can be previously-fired brass you've scavenged, of course. But you still gotta find powder and primers.
 

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I haven't seen any mention yet of case trimming tools ( Case length is critical for anything like 9mm or 45 ACP, which headspace on the case mouth. ) Such tools can be anything from an electrically powered device to hand operated ( they are usually not real expensive ). The best advice I've seen so far is the recommendation to obtain a reloading manual to learn the process. I learned that way many moons ago and consider it the most valuable learning tool in the entire process. Welcome to reloading. It is one of the most satisfying hobbies around.

P.S. There are less sophisticated manual tools available ( primarily from Lee ) with which you can load perfectly good ammo. They are slow and labor intensive but can be obtained within your budget. You will continue to want more upscale stuff but can get started with the low end tools if necessary. Just something to consider.
 

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I haven't seen any mention yet of case trimming tools ( Case length is critical for anything like 9mm or 45 ACP, which headspace on the case mouth. ) Such tools can be anything from an electrically powered device to hand operated ( they are usually not real expensive ). The best advice I've seen so far is the recommendation to obtain a reloading manual to learn the process. I learned that way many moons ago and consider it the most valuable learning tool in the entire process. Welcome to reloading. It is one of the most satisfying hobbies around.

P.S. There are less sophisticated manual tools available ( primarily from Lee ) with which you can load perfectly good ammo. They are slow and labor intensive but can be obtained within your budget. You will continue to want more upscale stuff but can get started with the low end tools if necessary. Just something to consider.
I've never trimmed a pistol case. Necked cases, absolutely, but not straight walled pistol cases.
 

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Thanks for the responses, guys. I have no idea what I need to keep a look out for though.

Could any of you be kind enough to tell me exactly what I'd need equipment wise to reload for .45?
The basic equipment needed will be this:

Press
Die set for each caliber
Lube method (carbide dies don't need lube, but I usually lube everything)
Powder Scale
Caliper

I think the best way to get into reloading is a "kit". They will usually have the press, scale, powder dispenser, reloading manual and primer tool, as well as a few odds and ends that you may or may not use. You need a caliper to measure your COAL (and yes, it's important to get things the correct length, so you can't just eyeball it).

You could definitely get into reloading for around $500, but that probably won't be enough to include much in the way of consumables (brass, bullets, powder and primers) in addition to the hardware. After you do it for a while, you'll find things other things to buy (bullet puller, brass tumbler, etc) but you don't need a bunch of stuff to get started. I think it's best to get started with the basic needs and add other stuff later. It'll help keep you from buying a bunch of stuff that you may not actually want/need.
 

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I am getting into it as well and what I have noticed is that one can not find components. I need a shellplate, and primers and I would be good to go. I am not however willing to spend $125 for a shellplate even if it is the only one I have seen. I will wait that one out. Can not find primers anywhere that I have looked.

That and paying $27.50 haz mat shipping fee for $5 worth of primers also seems ridiculous.
 

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Bad time to consider getting into reloading but I'm a believer in keeping it simple, for newbies at least. I doubt you'll be able to round up al the equipment and components anytime soon.

I wholeheartedly endorse learning on a singel-stage press. Would you buy a Harley to learn to ride a bicycle? Would you overhaul an engine without knowing how it at least works? You could, but it may not be wise. A progressive is great for pumping out large quantities of ammo, but hardly necessary.

Get a good reloading manual first. That should explain what all is needed. The list of accessories is endless, but much of it is not necessary.
 
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Its going to suck getting set only to be unable to find bullets and primers

Sent from my DROID4 using Tapatalk 2
 

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i have not gotten into reloading either i am kind of planning on starting soon or getting stuff together to be able to. I have took a hard look at the Hornady Lock N Load classic kit.... it comes with

Lock-N-Load Classic single-stage press
Lock-N-Load Powder Measure
Electronic Scale
The 8th Edition Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading
Three Lock-N-Load Die Bushings
Primer Catcher
Positive Priming System
Hand-Held Priming Tool
Universal Reloading Block
Chamfering and Deburring Tool
Primer Turning Plate
One Shot Case Lube

agian i am a newb to reloading but this kit looks like a very good deal. they can be had for 400 or so.... thoughts anybody?
 

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i have not gotten into reloading either i am kind of planning on starting soon or getting stuff together to be able to. I have took a hard look at the Hornady Lock N Load classic kit.... it comes with

Lock-N-Load Classic single-stage press
Lock-N-Load Powder Measure
Electronic Scale
The 8th Edition Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading
Three Lock-N-Load Die Bushings
Primer Catcher
Positive Priming System
Hand-Held Priming Tool
Universal Reloading Block
Chamfering and Deburring Tool
Primer Turning Plate
One Shot Case Lube

agian i am a newb to reloading but this kit looks like a very good deal. they can be had for 400 or so.... thoughts anybody?
I don't know a thing about the Hornady stuff but I will offer this: If I were going to use an electronic scale, I'd be darn sure it was a good one. Good doesn't necessarily mean expensive, but I'd want to be certain it was accurate to the degree that reloading requires. I've read more than one horror story about electronic scales, so I personally opted to avoid them altogether.
 

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I don't know a thing about the Hornady stuff but I will offer this: If I were going to use an electronic scale, I'd be darn sure it was a good one. Good doesn't necessarily mean expensive, but I'd want to be certain it was accurate to the degree that reloading requires. I've read more than one horror story about electronic scales, so I personally opted to avoid them altogether.

your exactly right, i believe in quality stuff.. just didnt know if anyone on here has any experience with this setup i am sure there are better quality stuff to buy but i wouldnt imagine you could go wrong with Hornady equipment
 

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Watch garage sales and such for used equipment. Ive bought all mine used so far a few new items. But for $500 you should get setup nicely. Most of my stuff is lee and there prices are reasonable. Just remember stuff is hard to find right now.
 
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