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I have been involved in the type of training he describes and have seen that particular brand of holsters do what he describes. It is actually pretty easy to do.
 

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Fobus paddle immediately came to mind. And this thing could be worse? Yikes.
 

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I wonder how many other holster-makers those same comments apply to? I have a Don Hume holster that rides too high, and thus the gun flops. Good thing I bought it used, cheap.
 

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I wonder how many other holster-makers those same comments apply to? I have a Don Hume holster that rides too high, and thus the gun flops. Good thing I bought it used, cheap.
Once one had experienced carrying a gun in a handmade custom holster, all the commercial offerings seem like junk in comparison. I haven't bought a commercial holster from anyone in decades.

ETA,
600-800 dollar gun or more worn with the wrong belt and holster in an attempt to keep costs down isn't making the smartest of choices IMO.
 

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I made a mistake of ordering "top of the line" paddle holster from High Noon. The grip of my P226 sticks out like crazy. So much so that printing could be made very easily. I emailed them and they told me kydex simply won't conceal like a leather holster. I have news for them, even a Fobus conceals better. That was an expensive mistake, and I will never buy anything from High Noon again, nor would I recommend them.
 

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Once one had experienced carrying a gun in a handmade custom holster, all the commercial offerings seem like junk in comparison.
Meaning this only as a constructive comment, virtually no one builds a 'custom' holster, nor a 'handmade' holster, in any sense that is different from, say, a Galco. That is, a company like Galco, and a company like Sparks, use exactly the same machines and hand operations to build a holster (on the photographic evidence). And the word 'custom' of course means 'built to fit you and only you'.

Of course there are very, very, very small holster makers who will make your holster to be cosmetically different from everyone else's; and will make it entirely by hand (using no machines including a sewing machine). But every maker hears the sirens' call of clicker dies sooner or later because hand-cutting is quite laborious. Imagine being faced with an order for 100 of the same holster you made 100 of last week? Out go the patterns to the die maker! Then moulding when a bud tells you about presses, drying when it's 0 degrees and raining outside, finishing when the maker has only two hands himself, etc. Nothing kills 'hand made' quite like success!!

I like to use Galco as an exemplar because the several holsters of theirs that I collected over the years are every bit as well made, and incorporate all the handwork, of the so-called 'custom' holster makers.
 

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Meaning this only as a constructive comment, virtually no one builds a 'custom' holster, nor a 'handmade' holster, in any sense that is different from, say, a Galco. That is, a company like Galco, and a company like Sparks, use exactly the same machines and hand operations to build a holster (on the photographic evidence). And the word 'custom' of course means 'built to fit you and only you'.

Of course there are very, very, very small holster makers who will make your holster to be cosmetically different from everyone else's; and will make it entirely by hand (using no machines including a sewing machine). But every maker hears the sirens' call of clicker dies sooner or later because hand-cutting is quite laborious. Imagine being faced with an order for 100 of the same holster you made 100 of last week? Out go the patterns to the die maker! Then moulding when a bud tells you about presses, drying when it's 0 degrees and raining outside, finishing when the maker has only two hands himself, etc. Nothing kills 'hand made' quite like success!!

I like to use Galco as an exemplar because the several holsters of theirs that I collected over the years are every bit as well made, and incorporate all the handwork, of the so-called 'custom' holster makers.
Wishing i could afford your holsters! Maybe some day soon. M1941 'THE MALTESE FALCON' pancake-style holster is what I'm looking at.
 

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I wonder how many other holster-makers those same comments apply to? I have a Don Hume holster that rides too high, and thus the gun flops. Good thing I bought it used, cheap.
Don Hume holsters are cheap, when NEW...so you must have really gotten it cheap.
 

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Here's something to think about:

Clint Smith says it but it's easy to gloss over. He says your holster should give you a FIRING GRIP. (emphasis mine). IOW if you have to re-adjust before you put the front sight on target, then you have the wrong holster, wrong belt, wrong wear location or something. It should, of course cover the trigger, b/c you could shoot yourself in the jewels or something being excited.

Look at what three-gun shooters use. They have that for a REASON. (partly it's to assure the safest possible re-holstering, but also speed of acquisition of the firing grip).

It's the best of all possible worlds, b/c it gives you a secure, 'straight on' full firing grip. If you COULD, you'd wear that (a little less glitzy of course). But we can't, we don't want to excite people, and it would be cumbersome to a degree. It's better than drop-leg, but in combat you'd snag it on stuff. See my point, though.



(I'm talking about the offset from the belt).

So holster makers should assure you can get a firing grip and in reality to optimize, they should sell the holster and (a) belt combo together. You want no give, or wobble or missing the holster when not looking. Concessions have to be made for your mode, which is CC, for example.

You could CC outside the pants but under a loose jacket. In MOST states or many, conceal is specifically defined...well, let me back up. IF your state defines 'conceal' as 'out of ordinary view' you should not endeavor to hide your defensive tool under three layers of shirts and sweaters and coats and jackets, if you don't have to.

But too often 'we' don't look at what's required and therefore make 'amateur' decisions. That's OK, because we 'are' amateurs. But we can try to think and understand the code and get better. We shouldn't have a lenient CC law and make things difficult because we are 'nervous' and have to have 'no trace' or have to wear tight shirts because it's 'fashion' I mean are you seriously carrying? Do you have serious threats.

Nuff said. Sorry to be long.
 

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I seems like there is enough good information online these days (including videos) that with due diligence anyone should be able to find one or two suitable holsters. Problems arise when eagerness to implement one's carry circumvents this process. Having said that, both I and Dutiful Wife own holsters that we can't/won't use.
 

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I seems like there is enough good information online these days (including videos) that with due diligence anyone should be able to find one or two suitable holsters. Problems arise when eagerness to implement one's carry circumvents this process. Having said that, both I and Dutiful Wife own holsters that we can't/won't use.
There are lots of false reviews/endorsements out there for even the worst holsters. Combine that with aggressive ad campaigns, and lots of crap holsters find futures in holster drawers.
 

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"A very low ride height makes for great concealment, but can be uncomfortable and makes for a fumbling draw."

Some of us need or strongly desire "great concealment". I don't carry a gun so I can whip it out and immediately shoot. I'm not going to try to outdraw someone who already has a gun pointed at me. In a spot like that, I'd probably choose to hand over my wallet or run to create an opening. Yes, that means I could die. But my understanding of concealed carry is that pulling a gun means I'm already IN a situation where I might die. In 40 years as an adult, I've pulled a gun once - and there were 8 of them and I had a six gun. But I had some room and the odds were bad enough that I felt justified - and as it turned out, I didn't need to shoot since no one volunteered to be the first person shot.

"Fumbling with your gun while someone is shooting at you won’t help your life expectancy."

I'm also pretty comfortable with the idea of pulling it slightly out and getting a better grip as I do so. I didn't get tunnel vision or lose my fine motor skills when shot at in combat, so I don't believe in the "sweaty hands" theory. And if someone is shooting at you, MOVE! Trading shots at close range means the bad guy may die with you, but it won't stop you from being shot. A gun is an OFFENSIVE weapon, not a shield.

"That makes the holster less rigid and interferes with reholstering."

Reholstering was and will be the LEAST of my concerns. Once my gun comes out, it is STAYING out until I think the threat is over. Once the threat is over, I'll take whatever time I wish to reholster - because I'll no longer be in danger. And I'll feel free to use two hands.

"They almost always point the muzzle directly at their side when doing so.. It’s a recipe for disaster."

I'm also fond of revolvers, or guns with hammers, and my thumb goes behind the hammer when putting it in a holster. I also don't holster a gun with my finger on the trigger. A well designed gun doesn't fire without the trigger pulled. But by the time I holster my gun, I plan to have the option of putting my gun on a table, pulling my holster off, and holstering - because my gun doesn't go back into the holster until the threat is over, it doesn't go into my holster with my finger on the trigger, and it has my thumb behind the hammer as I holster.

Me? I have a hard time finding a holster that allows me to CONCEAL well in hot weather. But I also like revolvers, shoot with one hand most of the time, and been known to carry pepper spray with me along with my gun. I don't do force on force training - only time I did was 30+ years ago and it was taught by the US Army at a course I was attending - and I spend more time in hardware stores or tack & feed stores than I do in downtown bars. And come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen someone at the feed store whose underwear was showing...
 

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I have found that (for me) the hybrid (Crossbreed-style) holsters are a poor choice. They seem to offer the worst of both worlds- the noisy 'click' of kydex and its tendency to wear the finish off all they high spots and the heat and lack of breathability of a huge sheet of leather. The leather gets sweaty and hot real fast and doesn't conform very well to the back side of the gun. This makes retention kind of dicey. At the same time the leather continues to warp/mold/change shape over time so you're always fiddling with the retention screws trying to fix something that can't be fixed by changing the distance between the kydex and the leather. In addition to being uncomfortably warm against the body the edges of the leather sheet also dig into your side every time you bend over. As if all that isn't bad enough, the back leather sheet either has to be cut low to allow for a firing but letting the grips rub your skin or cut high to protect your skin but make it difficult to grab the gun.

Now I only use two kinds of holsters- the artwork of Red Nichols and the pedestrian looking but high performance holsters of Garrett Industries.
 
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"A very low ride height makes for great concealment, but can be uncomfortable and makes for a fumbling draw."

Some of us need or strongly desire "great concealment". I don't carry a gun so I can whip it out and immediately shoot. I'm not going to try to outdraw someone who already has a gun pointed at me. In a spot like that, I'd probably choose to hand over my wallet or run to create an opening. Yes, that means I could die. But my understanding of concealed carry is that pulling a gun means I'm already IN a situation where I might die. In 40 years as an adult, I've pulled a gun once - and there were 8 of them and I had a six gun. But I had some room and the odds were bad enough that I felt justified - and as it turned out, I didn't need to shoot since no one volunteered to be the first person shot.

"Fumbling with your gun while someone is shooting at you won’t help your life expectancy."

I'm also pretty comfortable with the idea of pulling it slightly out and getting a better grip as I do so. I didn't get tunnel vision or lose my fine motor skills when shot at in combat, so I don't believe in the "sweaty hands" theory. And if someone is shooting at you, MOVE! Trading shots at close range means the bad guy may die with you, but it won't stop you from being shot. A gun is an OFFENSIVE weapon, not a shield.

"That makes the holster less rigid and interferes with reholstering."

Reholstering was and will be the LEAST of my concerns. Once my gun comes out, it is STAYING out until I think the threat is over. Once the threat is over, I'll take whatever time I wish to reholster - because I'll no longer be in danger. And I'll feel free to use two hands.

"They almost always point the muzzle directly at their side when doing so.. It’s a recipe for disaster."

I'm also fond of revolvers, or guns with hammers, and my thumb goes behind the hammer when putting it in a holster. I also don't holster a gun with my finger on the trigger. A well designed gun doesn't fire without the trigger pulled. But by the time I holster my gun, I plan to have the option of putting my gun on a table, pulling my holster off, and holstering - because my gun doesn't go back into the holster until the threat is over, it doesn't go into my holster with my finger on the trigger, and it has my thumb behind the hammer as I holster.

Me? I have a hard time finding a holster that allows me to CONCEAL well in hot weather. But I also like revolvers, shoot with one hand most of the time, and been known to carry pepper spray with me along with my gun. I don't do force on force training - only time I did was 30+ years ago and it was taught by the US Army at a course I was attending - and I spend more time in hardware stores or tack & feed stores than I do in downtown bars. And come to think of it, I don't think I've ever seen someone at the feed store whose underwear was showing...
It sounds like a Sneaky Pete or Versa-Carry would be right up your alley.
 
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