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As much as I love my Glocks, I only trust them (and me) when they're in an outside the waistband holster. I know that I"m in the minority here, particularly since I will only carry inside the waist band with an autoloader that has a safety, or a DA/SA model with a heavy double action pull, or a revolver. Having said all that, I'm considering modifying one of my Glocks with the New York trigger that will give it about an 11-12 pound pull so I can carry it IWB. Has anyone here done this? Did you like it? or did it pretty much suck? Thanks for any info or advice.
 

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You may be part of the minority that won’t carry a striker fired gun IWB, but IMHO making the trigger worse isn’t the answer.
My older brother is a retired LEO, was a Glock armorer, carried Glocks for 17 years on duty and another 15 since retirement and still won’t carry AIWB with a Glock.
Trigger finger discipline, and absolute vigilance are required. There is never a race to reholster, so you always have the time to reholster SAFELY!
With all that I’m a 100% believer in AIWB and all I u̷̶̷s̷̶̷e̷̶̷ carry are striker fired guns. Be careful!

my 2¢

Ed
 

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So, do you think the cops who shot themselves didn't have enough training? or so much that they became complacent?
Cops that don’t shoot themselves don’t have enough training either. We shouldn’t judge by that.
 

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So, do you think the cops who shot themselves didn't have enough training? or so much that they became complacent?
No amount of training or indoctrination will compensate for the individual brain that fails to adequately perceive or understand the seriousness of safe gun handling.

Leg shots seldom occur on the draw, most seem to occur on re-holstering. There's no gun fight or match that's ever been won based on the speed of re-holstering the sidearm.
 

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I think I remember are Yeager video, where somebody in the class had those drawstring things and he grabbed the scissors and cut them off.


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I don't even own any typical striker weapons, only a P99AS with the decocker. I refuse to carry them.
 
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No amount of training or indoctrination will compensate for the individual brain that fails to adequately perceive or understand the seriousness of safe gun handling.

Leg shots seldom occur on the draw, most seem to occur on re-holstering. There's no gun fight or match that's ever been won based on the speed of re-holstering the sidearm.
^^^^^^THIS^^^^^^

Ed
 

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I'm considering modifying one of my Glocks with the New York trigger that will give it about an 11-12 pound pull so I can carry it IWB.
The best guard against negligent discharge is a firing pin interlock. Without pulling the trigger... The best guard against the trigger being inadvertantly pulled is a Level II retention holster that fully covers the trigger.

All the firearms I ever owned had trigger pulls in the 6-lb range. Much more and unless your a linebacker for the Stellers, accuracy will suffer. Anything less and it's not safe on the draw, at least not if carried in Condition 2.
 

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Been carrying Glocks IWB and AIWB for 25+ years, aint neutered yet.
 

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There are plenty of people who consider the striker fired designs not safe enough for their own personal carry, so you're not alone in this.

From what I've gathered over the years, most of the unintentional self-inflicted gunshots were from either improper reholstering (snagging the trigger on loose fabric or strings) or from holsters that didn't adequately cover the trigger and keep it from being manipulated.

There are several possible solutions or combinations other than making the trigger worse, but if that's your choice have at it... just be sure to practice and become proficient with it.

The first solution is a quality holster to protect the trigger. I personally also choose light colored holsters that help me see into the holster so I can visually check for obstructions and watch the gun as I reholster. The typical black holster can be difficult to look into because minimal light is reflected inside.

Another set of solutions to consider is supplemental safeties on the gun. I'm a fan of the Springfield Armory backstrap safety on the grip, and have several. While reholstering I adjust my grip so the back strap isn't depressed, reducing risk of an oops. There are also thumb safeties on various striker guns; these can be activated before holstering and then disengaged in the holster if you choose, just be sure the holster covers the safety so it isn't clicked to a different position from daily life. Or, like the 1911 guys, learn to swipe the safety off during the draw and presentation.

Another option specifically for Glocks is "the Gadget". There's a company that makes a replacement back plate for Glocks that moves when the striker is pushed back, and by putting your thumb over the back plate you can keep the striker from moving while reholstering, similar to how guns with exposed hammer can be reholstered with the thumb behind the hammer to detect if it's moving. This helps reduce risk during what seems the most common self-inflicted gunshot (accidentally pulling trigger while reholstering).
 

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My solution between the lighter striker fired and heavier hammer fired is to have a striker with safety. I currently carry a shield with safety. I only engage the safety when holstering and then simply disengage it afterwards. Being a lefty makes it easy since most safety levers are on the left so it’s easy access for me.
 

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I carry a safety-less revolver. The same potential problems exist. The thing is you need to have awareness of what you are doing and practice trigger discipline.

There is no race to re-holster the gun.

It all comes down the person and their personal practices with the firearm. Basic safety practices used, means no danger. Part of that means knowing what kinds of clothes to NOT wear. I have no problems carrying a gun with the only safety being me.

A big part of this conversation is ones personal comfort level with the tools you are caring. Being more familiar with the hardware, and not becoming complacent are the two big things that are important when carrying firearms.
 

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...

As much as I love my Glocks, I only trust them (and me) when they're in an outside the waistband holster. I know that I"m in the minority here, particularly since I will only carry inside the waist band with an autoloader that has a safety, or a DA/SA model with a heavy double action pull, or a revolver. Having said all that, I'm considering modifying one of my Glocks with the New York trigger that will give it about an 11-12 pound pull so I can carry it IWB. Has anyone here done this? Did you like it? or did it pretty much suck? Thanks for any info or advice.
Glocks are how they are. I've personally experienced a negligent discharge with a Glock 19 for the same reason the chief in the video experienced his. It had little to do with the Glock's lack of external safety, but everything to do with poor handling/holstering practices and skills. Mine was into the ground about three feet to my front as I moved the muzzle back toward the holster from an extended shooting position. Startled and apparently dissatisfied with the first ND, I involuntarily squeezed off a second, a few feet in front of the first.

Aside from being a Glock, there was nothing wrong with the Glock. The errors were 100% shooter, results of my previous failures to establish safe, proven practices in the handling of my gun combined with inattention to what I was doing. That said, I developed very exact, very precise methods of trigger finger behavior before, during and after presentation to the target. I'll give you the short version. If my muzzle isn't pointed directly at the target, my finger is off the trigger. Moreover, my finger comes off my trigger before the muzzle comes off the trigger, every time. Precision shooting, speed shooting, combat shooting, whenever. Not on target, not on trigger. Practice that particular bit of muscle and mental memory until it becomes the only way you can do it.

Chief made a stack of errors holstering. Re-watch the video until they all become apparent to you. That said, I'll give you my own list of always and never while holstering.

Always clear your cover garment away from the mouth of the holster. Whether a t-shirt or winter park or anything in between, deliberately and carefully clear the cover garment. Unzip your coat, pull it up and away from the mouth of the holster with your weak side hand, and visually look the gun back into the holster. If you are too rotund or carry behind 3:00 and cannot look it all the way back in to the holster, at least be mindful enough and careful enough to slowly and deliberately holster the gun. Never, ever holster without carefully clearing all cover garments. The chief in the video did none of the things I described.

Here is a gun-induced accidental discharge I did not have as a result of following the above procedures. I had recently replaced a stock Glock trigger with a Zev whiz-bang, much-improved hi dollar after market trigger assembly. I had run it several times with the replacement trigger, and was much impressed. I mean, this was a wonderful trigger set-up. I did a glowing review of it here, singing its praises and simply marveling at how wonderful my new tacticool gear was. About five hundred rounds in, I was doing shot timer work out of the holster with it. Slowly and carefully holstering as I always do, I felt slight resistance as the gun was about halfway in the holster. I stopped, carefully removed the gun and examined it. What I had originally thought was a pin holding the trigger safety in place was actually a threaded screw which had unscrewed itself through use and was now far enough out that it had snagged on the holster. Had I been holstering like the chief had holstered, I would have experienced the same result.

Learn and practice to safely handle and holster your gun. Don't mess with the gear in an attempt to offset your carelessness and ineptitude. Develop those safe skills, and practice them relentlessly.
 
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