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In my fooling around with guns and hunting with heavy caliber pistols I have run across many pistol cartridges that are fantastic hunting rounds. But forty years of shooting revolvers with heavy rounds has ruined my wrists and a lot of folks just don't like hunting with heavy handguns. However they all seem to like shooting my 1958 .44 cal. Cattlemans Carbine. So why not make a revolver type five or six shot camp carbine in the big pistol cartridges and even in the old venerable 45/70 BP load. easy to use works as simply as a revolver pistol and easy to manage hard hitting rounds. They really should sell if you don't price them out of reach.
 

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In black powder days the Colt Revolving Carbine was known to leak powder and when fired all chambers ignited simultaneously injuring the support hand. Fast forward to modern times I have heard of people injuring themselves with unconventional positioning of support hand on a revolver by blast from the chamber. That being said I have not heard of any such injuries with Rossi's revolving carbine in .45 Colt/410 gauge.
 

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In black powder days the Colt Revolving Carbine was known to leak powder and when fired all chambers ignited simultaneously injuring the support hand. Fast forward to modern times I have heard of people injuring themselves with unconventional positioning of support hand on a revolver by blast from the chamber. That being said I have not heard of any such injuries with Rossi's revolving carbine in .45 Colt/410 gauge.
Rossi made a modification to close off the cylinder gap, so the support hand can be forward of the cylinder.

There are a number of makers who have .357 or .44 production lever actions, which is probably why revolving carbines in those calibers aren't widespread. Most people would rather have a lever action, which can be topped off mid magazine, and doesn't have cylinder gap issues, and has more iconic aesthetics.
 
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Marlin makes a .45-70 lever action...and a darn good one, at that.
 
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I wonder why heavy pistol carbines are not around
I think "heavy" is the operative word, as to why. Have had a couple, and they are that. Loved the accuracy. Hated the overall weight. Really loved the accuracy. Mine were in pistol calibers. At 9-10rds, I'd likely have a hard time going to 6rds for a practical rifle. But then, if it could easily convert from my normally-carried revolver sidearm, that'd be a real plus.


So why not make a revolver type five or six shot camp carbine in the big pistol cartridges and even in the old venerable 45/70 BP load. easy to use works as simply as a revolver pistol and easy to manage hard hitting rounds. They really should sell if you don't price them out of reach.
There are a few made, in the basic revolver/carbine format, though in various calibers.

Uberti 1873 Revolver Carbine, 1873 Buntline Target; with a range report for the gun.

Revolving Carbine - Repeating Rifles

"Circuit Judge" 410/45Colt Revolving Shotgun/Rifle from Taurus/Rossi

Izhmash KR-22: Nagant Revolver Carbine in .22 LR

Beretta Firearms: Stampede Buntline Carbine

And, from the 1850's: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colt_revolving_rifle
 

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Why would I buy a revolving carbine in a pistol caliber when I can buy a lever action that holds more rounds, a cylinder gap problem doesn't even come into play and already coms in a proven platform such as an 1892 Winchester or 1894 Marlin and in calibers like .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum, .45 Colt and in the case of some of the Rossi 1892 clones, a .454 Casull chambering? The .45-70 really is not a pistol cartridge by any stretch of the imagination but again we already have the 1895 Marlin and 1886 Winchester clones in .45-70 filling that niche. I think what you're really after is a modern revolving carbine and there are a few out there like the Uberti SAA revolving rifles and the Rossi but that's really about it. For all practical purposes, the revolving rifle became obsolete with the introduction of the 1860 Henry rifle and for good reason.
 

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When I read the thread title, I thought pistol caliber semi-auto carbines. Revolver carbines were replaced by lever-action rifles back in the 1800s.

My .44magnums.

 
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