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Have been reading a book on Combat Shooting by Ayoob,he recommends joining IDPA any shooting in matches whenever possible.
He points out that it is a lot cheaper than formal lessons and that the various courses of fire translate very well to real life scenarios!
I think I may join and start looking for matches, any active IDPA shooters here? I plan to join local Gun Club ASAP but for those of you that shoot at clubs you must hear about these matches all the time.
 

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This is what made me start shooting IDPA:

 

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Joined IDPA last year. The local IDPA club (New Bedford, MA) is very creative at setting up the stages. Good fun and terrific practice.
 

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You can find some matches by going to IDPA - Welcome!, but you will have to be more specific than "Upstate NY" as far as location. You can also find matches by asking at your LGS or a local shooting range. Some clubs shoot only indoors, while other clubs have the luxury of being able to shoot outdoors.
 

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Have been reading a book on Combat Shooting by Ayoob,he recommends joining IDPA any shooting in matches whenever possible.
He points out that it is a lot cheaper than formal lessons and that the various courses of fire translate very well to real life scenarios!
I think I may join and start looking for matches, any active IDPA shooters here? I plan to join local Gun Club ASAP but for those of you that shoot at clubs you must hear about these matches all the time.
Keep in mind IDPA is NOT training...unless you are training to shoot IDPA matches.

IDPA is a PIECE of my overall training regimen. I shoot IDPA matches occasionally to get some practice on a course I did not set up , shooting against other good shooters (I shoot MA class) , with the "stress" of the timer and peer witness.

It is a test of your shooting and gunhandling (draw, reload, clear malfunctions) under stress. That is it. It does not teach you HOW to shoot. It does not teach you HOW to reload.It does not teach you how to clear malfunctions. It does not teach you how to recognize the cues of impending criminal assault and move to better position before the fight starts, or how to integrate hand, knife and gun techniques into a usable package...THAT is what TRAINING does.

In fact, BECAUSE it is a game and BECAUSE it is a shooting sport it has rules that would not apply on the street and it forces you to do some things that are tactically questionable at best.

HAVING said that, what it DOES do for you is give you an arena where you can use your real everyday carry gear and gun and test your gunhandling and shooting skills against others and meet a lot of like minded individuals.

It is fun....it is relatively inexpensive once you own the gun and ancillary equipment....and it is a good tool to use as a piece of your overall training regimen. But it is NOT a substitute for actual training.
 

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IDPA is not training. It IS a good way to practice marksmanship in situations other than known distance shooting at stationary targets, determine where you need to work on specific aspects of your gunhandling or shooting, and an it MAY be an opportunity to receive mentoring from more skilled and experienced shooters. For those who usually shoot on commercial "square" ranges, it is also a very good opportunity to do things that they might not otherwise get to do - shooting under stress (it's amazing how much stress we impose on ourselves once someone tells us that we're being timed and scored), drawing and firing from concealment with live ammunition, shooting while moving, transitioning rapidly between multiple targets, shooting at moving targets, shooting at targets that only appear for a second or two, and shooting while in less than ideal positions.

As long as you don't mistake it for actual training, I'd say that it's a very constructive venue in which to practice the skills learned in training - and it can be a lot of fun too!
 

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Keep in mind IDPA is NOT training...unless you are training to shoot IDPA matches.

IDPA is a PIECE of my overall training regimen. I shoot IDPA matches occasionally to get some practice on a course I did not set up , shooting against other good shooters (I shoot MA class) , with the "stress" of the timer and peer witness.

It is a test of your shooting and gunhandling (draw, reload, clear malfunctions) under stress. That is it. It does not teach you HOW to shoot. It does not teach you HOW to reload.It does not teach you how to clear malfunctions. It does not teach you how to recognize the cues of impending criminal assault and move to better position before the fight starts, or how to integrate hand, knife and gun techniques into a usable package...THAT is what TRAINING does.

In fact, BECAUSE it is a game and BECAUSE it is a shooting sport it has rules that would not apply on the street and it forces you to do some things that are tactically questionable at best.

HAVING said that, what it DOES do for you is give you an arena where you can use your real everyday carry gear and gun and test your gunhandling and shooting skills against others and meet a lot of like minded individuals.

It is fun....it is relatively inexpensive once you own the gun and ancillary equipment....and it is a good tool to use as a piece of your overall training regimen. But it is NOT a substitute for actual training.
Pretty much sums up my take on it.

I'm currently the match director for my local club. Started shooting IDPA near the end of '09. I really like it. I've shot a couple of state matches and I shoot matches when I can in other states or other local clubs.
 

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I just started a few months ago. I recommend it highly. I don't view it as training. It's just an opportunity to test my gear, and get some draw and fire time with it. After the first few matches, I learned a lot about what does and does not work with carrying, drawing, firing and reloading a revolver under pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the replies, I have been training & my instructor has said I am ready for some more advanced work/added stress.
It may be fun and beneficial.
 

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It's a good game. Fun. It'll sharpen you up some. You'll shoot for speed and accuracy, with a guy and his timer right behind you. You'll be under stress, since you won't want to screw up and look like a fool in front of a bunch of people. You won't, but you will darn sure have that on your mind. Shooting has a motherload of ego in it.

But it won't even begin to mimic the stress of a fight. It's a good way to help stay sharp, but it won't MAKE you sharp. A real fight (guns or fists) is a whole different animal.

There is no fear in a match.
 

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IDPA is the most affordable way to become a proficient defensive hand gunnner. It may not train you to shoot/reload/deal with malfunctions, but you will learn alot about shooting from cover, weak hand shooing and reloads, bullet placement, and many other things.

Its a great expierence for what it costs to participate in.
 

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I prefer IPSC but it's similar to IDPA. Disagree with the above - it IS training, of a sort.

You learn to perform under the pressure of time and adrenaline, you learn target acquisition, you learn a lot of things you won't experience at the range firing at static targets. For FoF training, you'll need a good partner and a blue or red gun and a floor you can hit without hurting yourself too much. Challenge yourself as much as you can - in all conceivable scenarios. Always best to train against the drop: The BG will almost always have the advantage so get lots of practice starting from the sucker punch.

It will be your lucky day when you can draw and aim like you do in your home in front of the mirror. In real life, that will probably not happen. Most likely, you'll be looking down the bore of a gun you've just been smashed in the face with. You have broken teeth, a mouthful of blood, your ears are ringing, you're going to puke. That's your starting position. Go.
 

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i have lived in the atlanta area for about 6 years now. between idpa and uspsa we literally have as many as 10 matches a week. never any less than 6. the only day of the week there is not a match is usually friday nights. i personally shoot 2-5 matches a week give or take my schedule and ammo on hand.

i say all that to say what others have said. if you are not going to and or can not afford formal training classes idpa will give you the opportunity to practice certain skills you will not get to practice any other way. but 1 thing you must never do is mistake it for training. both idpa and uspsa have rules that are not logical, practical and actually down right dangerous in a real world self defense situation.

my recommendation would be to shoot the match. but never play the game. never shoot to win a match. shoot it safely according to the rules of safety. but never shoot for points and time. if you carry a light then shoot with a light. shoot that match exactly how you carry your gun on a daily basis. the matches will help you gain some proficiency in doing things like shooting on the move, from cover, multiple targets and a host of other things. getting use to drawing from concealment is another big plus.
 
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