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Plus you can get AP rounds for it that will go though anything short of level 4 armor ..

The issue I see is the cost of ammo and needed to do mods to it to run commerical non mil spec 30-06 ammoo
That ported gas plug is $40 and you don't even need that to shoot the cheapest ammo, from the CMP. But it is nice, I put one in both of mine.

Back in the day when I LOOKED at store bought ammo, Remington 30-06 was $19.95 /box of 20. Remington .223/ $19 something for a box of 20. I know with shopping a little both those could be beat but it illustrates there wasn't a WORLD of difference and in a DEFENSIVE rifle you are betting your life on I imagine that is about the last thing you will be thinking about in a defensive situation. I'd be looking at something a little more like "I hope this will get through that jacket/ door jam / car door".
 

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I have chosen the AK as my go to rifle. It is very reliable, more accurate than I am, and packs a punch.

It also can continue to fire even if you have not been able to clean it.
 

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If I could only have one rifle, it would be a bolt action .30-06.
A .30-06 Rem 700 is my only "big-bore" rifle. The only reason I might consider something bigger would be if I were hunting Kodiak Griz.
 
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Regarding the M1 rifle.

In the spirit of Forum debate and in an attempt to refute what amounts to nothing more significant than rumor arising from internet firearms forum repetition, I gotta say that the M1 rifle is not the shrinking violet of the .30-06 rifle world that the internet rumor mill would have us believe, but rather a dependable robust rifle. It helped win a world war, was used during its years of service with types of ammunition outside of the limitations of sporting ammunition. The M1 is not delicate.

I'd never heard of special M1 gas plugs or special ammunition for the M1 until well after the advent of the internet firearms forums. At this point it seems that when the M1 is discussed, this rumor is reflexively trotted out and repeated endlessly. A small market has grown around the perceived need for all this special stuff.

The M1 rifle does not require any especially designed aftermarket gas plug (gas cylinder lock) nor does it require special expensive ammunition tailored specifically for it and any attempt to assert that it does is a marketing ploy. The M1 rifle, equipped with standard gas system and a fresh operating rod spring, will give perfect satisfaction with any common factory .30-06 ammunition and particularly loves well crafted handloads using .30 bullets in the 125 grain to 180 grain weight. Appropriate powders in the medium range of burning rates when used in handloads give excellent function if used with published data for the correct bullet weights. That would be the powders falling between number 79 (Hodgdon H322) and number 114 (Hodgdon H380) as found on the chart below. Some experimentation with powders slightly faster or slightly slower could yield useful loads, but care must be taken when dealing with slower burning powders.



One needn't concern himself with burning rates of propellants uses in common factory .30-06 ammunition with M1 appropriate bullet weights unless he intends to use some sort of boutique "+P" labeled ammunition. It has been years since 200 grain to 220 grain .30-06 ammunition could commonly be found at retail and there is not good reason to choose those bullet weights for use in the M1.

Just last year I burned off two boxes of this stuff that I found lurking in my rifle ammo locker. From where it came I do not know. The M1 ate it like candy and produced decent groups too.
Not special factory "M1 ammunition."



The heavy bullets tend to produce higher port pressure out at the gas port. The slow burning powders tend to produce higher pressure at the gas port, even if the load itself doesn't produce maximum pressures. This is unnecessarily hard on the gas system and action parts. It can also contribute to feeding issues. Some match competitors have used bullet weights up to 190 grains supposedly with success, but I've not experimented with .30 caliber bullets of that weight.

If the rifle is fed overloads, ammunition prepared with powders having a burning rate too slow, or with heavy bullets then the rifle will grumble and let you know about it. Ejection tends to be more violent and cases are thrown far and wide, frequently to the rear of the shooter.

I have a relative who when he was young believed in 220 grain Sierra round nose bullets and max loads of H4831. He used it for hunting and all .30-06 shooting purposes. In the early 1980s he obtained an M1 from the DCM (the CMP's predecessor) so shot the rifle with his favorite load.

The rifle's ejection function was almost startling to witness. Cases became deadly projectiles themselves, with rims sheared and case mouths damaged. Nonetheless this individual continued to shoot them for a time. Now, 40 years later he reports the rifle has given good service over years of service rifle competition and and yet remains serviceable. He did stop using that heavy .30-06 load after a year or two.

I've owned three M1s. I obtained an NRA publication on the M1 in 1977 when I got my first M1 so I was warned off the use of heavy bullets from the start. My ol' favorite M1 spent fully 20 years on the firing line in high power competition firing 700 rounds or more each season. It still goes to the occasional match and sees regular range and plinking fun. Proper attention to cleaning and lubrication and routine replacement of the operation rod spring (when I get around to thinking about it) has stood the rifle in good stead. No special ammunition or gas systems need apply.

Anyway, that's an anecdotal pontification of one person's experience and point of view on the subject. The gas system can be viewed as a comparatively primitive design, being located so near the muzzle and so having the required long operating rod with supporting design which all adds weight, but it's a sound design that is very dependable. I don't recall my rifle ever once failing to properly feed and fire, not once since I acquired it from the DCM in March of 1987. The only failure I ever experienced had to do with a gunsmith who tricked out trigger group which wore some years after the work was accomplished, causing the rifle to go full auto near the end of a prone stage. There were three shots remaining in the clip. As far as I know the stamped steel marker for firing point 12 at the Central Texas Rifle and Pistol Association range yet bears a .30 hole through it, my last shot from the burst. I rebuilt the trigger group myself the second time through trial and error, plugging in parts, and gained a trigger pull feel equal to the gunsmith's work. It's held up ever since too.



Some father and son range time with M1s.
 

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Oh no! too late!
For your posts, it’s never too late. I can read them all day long. I think you and I were just doing the same thing, just differently.

Wish we could go shoot together tomorrow. That’d be wonderful. Our darn Governor has dictated we wear those fool masks outside even if not in a group, but “potentially” in a group. 😂
 

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Well, perhaps the masks are the latest thing in noise protection, or acts as a recoil reducer, or something.

Oh man, how I'd love to go shooting with you tomorrow!
 
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Discussion Starter #118
Given those parameters, have you considered the Mini-14 or Mini-30?
They're both on my list for consideration. I just don't know how good those are compared to the others. What is better and worse about the Minis compared to the other options? AR, ACR, Tavor, M14, etc?
Since it appears that you are looking for a good all around rifle that could serve you well for everything from hunting to two-legged threats. One rifle that comes to mind pretty quickly is the Ruger Mini-30. In it's basic form, it is a very competent rifle with a cartridge (7.62x39) that can take deer, can defend against more dangerous game, and is a proven man stopper in combat situations. Lot to say for this little .30 caliber rifle.
I don't plan to use this for hunting. The role this rifle will fill is, it's the end of the world, my house is on fire, and I'm joining a militia to save my country from an invasion. No more internet, no more buying ammo or spare parts, nothing. I have what I have until I'm dead or the war is over.

How well does a Mini 30 compare to rifles like the Tavor 7, Scar 16, and AR10?
 

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They're both on my list for consideration. I just don't know how good those are compared to the others. What is better and worse about the Minis compared to the other options? AR, ACR, Tavor, M14, etc?

I don't plan to use this for hunting. The role this rifle will fill is, it's the end of the world, my house is on fire, and I'm joining a militia to save my country from an invasion. No more internet, no more buying ammo or spare parts, nothing. I have what I have until I'm dead or the war is over.

How well does a Mini 30 compare to rifles like the Tavor 7, Scar 16, and AR10?
No more ammo or spare parts? Get an AR15. Parts and ammo are everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #120
Really I would never want one semi auto to fill all roles ..Just ask the Brits how that work with using the SA80 for a smg a carbine and a LMG .. ...

I would say at min for me it would be

1. A 223 rifle either a AR or a Tavor or Aug or persoanl choice a Galil
2. something with reach like a 308 or 7.62x54r etc

Frankly looking at where everthing is at now I would pick

A galil or a AK ..Why you ask ..Well they are not as cheep as a AR but will run till the end with very little care or cleaning or spare parts ..Mags and ammo can still be found ..And they are made for steel cased ammo which is right now about the only cheep ammo left

I dont know about you but having 4 50 round Galil mags ready to go is a handy thing .....
I am considering an M1A along with several different .223/.556 rifles, but whichever rifle I get will only ever see use if I'm in a militia, so I doubt I'll be carrying 2 rifles at the same time.

You're the first to talk about the Galil. I believe they run about $1800, and they're Israeli made, so I assume they're good. You mentioned reliability already. I What else does it do better than some of these other rifles? How do they compare to a Tavor?
 
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